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The location data is drawn from apps that users have granted location tracking of that app. I happen to let google maps track me as it's a way of keeping track of my motor adventures, places visited etc. This isn't really newsworthy as echelon has been doing the same thing without anyone's permissions for several decades.
And if you don't want location data being tracked, turn apps off that ask for location permissions.

:dunno
 

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Just turn off location access for all your apps except for those that truly need it.

If you don't want them tracking you via cell phone tower access, turn the phone off or leave it home.
 

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What brownie and AFJuvat said.
 

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Just turn off location access for all your apps except for those that truly need it.

If you don't want them tracking you via cell phone tower access, turn the phone off or leave it home.
Negative. That won't work.
The cell network knows where you're at (if you have coverage) because it needs that information in order to ring your phone for incoming calls and texts.
Now, you say... Well, that's just the cell site sector, and it's a pretty big area.

Nope.

In reality, your cell phone is in synchronization with several cell sites at once.
It's a fairly easy matter to determine your location, pretty accurately, EVEN WITHOUT GPS.
In fact, that's how "911" works when you turn off your GPS.
I think the latest accuracy requirement (per FCC) is 300 feet (horiz only, not vertical).
I could be wrong... as it's been at least two years since I looked into that.
Hell, you could get 300-feet with TDOA (Time Distance of Arrival) and that was 5-6 years ago. Maybe longer. (And 3G).

All that stuff you see on those TV shows is BS.
Network capabilities vary by locale, but everywhere in Florida is pretty much up-to-date.

You would be amazed at how much data (private and otherwise) that the cell phone network collects about you -- even without intending to -- just by the nature of how the technology works.
It really does require significant oversight, in my opinion -- but that doesn't seem to be in the cards, vis-a-vis "Net Neutrality" (which is load of horse****, BTW).
That said, thankfully we haven't had the full-on abuses yet, but just wait... it'll happen.
 

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Negative. That won't work.
The cell network knows where you're at (if you have coverage) because it needs that information in order to ring your phone for incoming calls and texts.
Now, you say... Well, that's just the cell site sector, and it's a pretty big area.

Nope.

In reality, your cell phone is in synchronization with several cell sites at once.
It's a fairly easy matter to determine your location, pretty accurately, EVEN WITHOUT GPS.
In fact, that's how "911" works when you turn off your GPS.
I think the latest accuracy requirement (per FCC) is 300 feet (horiz only, not vertical).
I could be wrong... as it's been at least two years since I looked into that.
Hell, you could get 300-feet with TDOA (Time Distance of Arrival) and that was 5-6 years ago. Maybe longer. (And 3G).

All that stuff you see on those TV shows is BS.
Network capabilities vary by locale, but everywhere in Florida is pretty much up-to-date.

You would be amazed at how much data (private and otherwise) that the cell phone network collects about you -- even without intending to -- just by the nature of how the technology works.
It really does require significant oversight, in my opinion -- but that doesn't seem to be in the cards, vis-a-vis "Net Neutrality" (which is load of horse****, BTW).
That said, thankfully we haven't had the full-on abuses yet, but just wait... it'll happen.
Interesting.....

My response to that is "faraday cage"
 

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Are you guys aware of GPS blockers? They do work.....
Are you aware that in the United States, use, or even possession of a GPS blocker is a violation of federal law and punishable by a fine of up to $112,500 for the first offense?
And depending upon circumstances, could also result in felony arrest with laws that vary by State.

I wouldn't recommend it.
 

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Now a days it really don't matter if they want to track my cell phone, Smart TV, Computer or any other way.
What I don't like is the way China, India & other countries can call your phone about 15 or 20 times a day (Robo Calls) and they just say "Do not answer the phone" Talking about the phone you are paying for.
I really do not care if they want to track where I'm at and it is fine as long as they do not keep calling me 20 times a day.

Ronnie
 

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Please explain this for an old guy...6 weeks ago the VA sent me a Blood Pressure monitor to use for 90 days. When I use it and am finished it says sending your data. The data is then sent over some unknown network that sends it 175 miles { I guess really don't know where it goes } to the VA in Phoenix AZ, where a nurse views the results, I accidentally pushed a wrong button and the nurse called me in about 15 minutes to check my answer???Medtronic is the device :dunno
 

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Are you aware that in the United States, use, or even possession of a GPS blocker is a violation of federal law and punishable by a fine of up to $112,500 for the first offense?
And depending upon circumstances, could also result in felony arrest with laws that vary by State.

I wouldn't recommend it.
You left out that they will whack your pee pee too.....
 

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Are you aware that in the United States, use, or even possession of a GPS blocker is a violation of federal law and punishable by a fine of up to $112,500 for the first offense?
And depending upon circumstances, could also result in felony arrest with laws that vary by State.

I wouldn't recommend it.
And this is enforced by the same agency that prosecutes Robo-callers who spoof numbers, right?

I agree with you, but I'm just sayin!
 

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Please explain this for an old guy...6 weeks ago the VA sent me a Blood Pressure monitor to use for 90 days. When I use it and am finished it says sending your data. The data is then sent over some unknown network that sends it 175 miles { I guess really don't know where it goes } to the VA in Phoenix AZ, where a nurse views the results, I accidentally pushed a wrong button and the nurse called me in about 15 minutes to check my answer???Medtronic is the device :dunno
My CPAP does the same thing. It has a built in cellular modem that uses the cellular network to send the data. I don't know who the heck is paying for the service because I'm not. I assume that my insurance company's DME (durable medical equipment) provider is billing the insurance for it.
 

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And this is enforced by the same agency that prosecutes Robo-callers who spoof numbers, right?

I agree with you, but I'm just sayin!
The FCC has actually had some high-profile busts of robo-callers, including one poor fella I actually felt a little (very little) sorry for.
He was an insurance salesman and thought he could generate a few juicy leads via robo-calling.
In the end, he didn't really make much money -- but got whopped for some enormous federal fine (in the millions) that he'll never get out from under.
I remember it because he filed his tax returns with the FCC clearly indicating he had no way to pay it -- and the FCC said they did not care.
Ability to pay was only one factor they consider when motions to reduce fines are made.
I recall thinking: That guy may as well leave the country. He's screwed.

But your point is well-taken.
The amount of fines the FCC collects is pitifully low. Single digit percentages.
And collecting from overseas bad actors (i.e., robo-callers), probably zero.

But it's also not fair to label this an FCC problem (at least not entirely).
The phone industry wanted VOIP badly, and unfortunately, opening up networks like that just invites robo-calling.
At one point last year - we were on track to have nearly 40 PERCENT of all network traffic being robocalls. That's an alarming high number!!
Shaken-n-Stirred seems to have put a major brake on the practice, though some calls still get through.
 

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This is what I use so that I can not be triangulated but have my phone readily available for use.

I think it works because I can not call my cell from my home phone when the cell is in the pouch.

https://www.amazon.com/dp/B00PPWARWE/ref=twister_B0836M5L6J?_encoding=UTF8&psc=1
If you're real close to a cell tower (or similar) it may not work.
But - I would advise just turning the phone off.
Under conditions of a highly attenuated downlink signal (i.e., by placing the handset in one of these RF shielded bags), all you're going to do is wear that battery out faster.
The phone will transmit at full power trying to synchronize with the network(s), if it even gets a whif of signal through that bag.
Save the life of your battery and just turn it off.
 

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If you're real close to a cell tower (or similar) it may not work.
But - I would advise just turning the phone off.
Under conditions of a highly attenuated downlink signal (i.e., by placing the handset in one of these RF shielded bags), all you're going to do is wear that battery out faster.
The phone will transmit at full power trying to synchronize with the network(s), if it even gets a whif of signal through that bag.
Save the life of your battery and just turn it off.
I don't know anything about the technical side of this, but I was under the impression that simply turning you phone "off" did not solve the problem of tracking??
 

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I don't know anything about the technical side of this, but I was under the impression that simply turning you phone "off" did not solve the problem of tracking??
Nor agencies being able to listen to everything being said within range of the mic. Only way to keep some from listening in is to take the batt out of the phone. I have an "acquaintance" whose agency can hear everything you say even with the phone turned off. He regularly takes his batt out of the phone when we're speaking face to face and HIS "acquaintance" works within the part of that agency that can and does listen in to anyone they find of interest for any reason, or no reason at all.

Me, I don't give a crap about what they hear or where they can track my movements. I'm not discussing anything that would threaten gov or it's agents.
 

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I don't know anything about the technical side of this, but I was under the impression that simply turning you phone "off" did not solve the problem of tracking??
Turning the handset "OFF" completely hides it from the cellular networks.

You can do the same with almost all handsets (in fact all that I know of), by placing the phone in airplane mode.
If your phone's airplane mode still allows Wi-Fi (and I don't think many do), you could still be tracked that way -- technically, though not practically in most cases.
 
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