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Hell yes you shot fast!
And if anything couldn’t keep up; oh well!

View attachment 77624

Brownie had you wrapped tighter than Dick’s hatband that day…. 👍👍👍
BH accomplished the objective in the face of adversity, speed and on threat. Didn't let a little piece of cloth stop him from living ;)
 

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🤠 He said that guy was gonna kill me RFN. . . FIRE!!! I wasn't letting an old cover shirt stop me from gettin' that somebeach first! 🤣
It was one of the many highlights through the years training with you guys (y)
 

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It was one of the many highlights through the years training with you guys (y)
Yeah, we all got a good laugh over that one. I think Live2wheel laughed louder than me! I kept that shirt as a momento to a great training day and a great lesson in persevering when things aren't going as you thought. . . NEVER. EVER. GIVE. UP or you'll have the rest of your life to think about it! 🤠
 

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One of the best instructors anywhere is Rob Leatham. He's running .15/.16 splits or 6 rds a second. He's a trigger slapper along with Enos. I've seen others getting those split times on occasion, but even the best trigger fingers will be hard pressed to match or beat that trigger speed.

On my best day, splits have been .19/.20. It would take another 300K rds to get to .15/.16 splits no matter how I run the trigger. Having no interest in getting to .15/.16 splits, I didn't train my educated trigger finger further than .19/.20's and averaging around .24/.25 splits with the occasional .20 splits [ rare indeed for my finger ].

Thankfully, I was able to educated my trigger finger to 4-5 a second without even thinking about trigger rest. All I had to do was shoot beyond my present capabilities [ at any given time ] to develop the proprioception in that finger along with it's twitch muscle/s ].
I'm not a wordsmith.

I have no idea if Bob and I 'ride the reset' in the same way.

I learned my handgun skills in the service.

The corps isn't about artistry. It's about cookie cutter consistency. It take men and women from every walk of life and teaches them how to bring the rifle to shoulder, aim, 'squeeze' the trigger and hit the target.

Handgun 'training' is for e5s and officers, and let me tell you, you could be drunk and pass the course.

I did significant amounts of additional training. I do not remember ever being told to 'ride the reset', but when Bob talked about it, I realized that that was what I was doing, and I realized why.

Consistency and ease of cyclic trigger motion.

From my perspective, taking the finger off the trigger and finding it again increases the number of things that can go wrong.

Is it the only way to get that kind of consistency?

Nope, but darned if an objective review doesn't tell me that any other way requires more training to get the same result. It has to, there is more movement involved.

I saw you shoot. Are you telling me that you were taking the finger off the trigger and finding it again?

Say it and I'll believe you.
 

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I saw you shoot. Are you telling me that you were taking the finger off the trigger and finding it again?

Say it and I'll believe you.
There is a difference between allowing the trigger to freely move freely and taking one's finger off it completely. Sorta like letting up on the brake without taking your foot off the pedal. Or, if you prefer, letting up on the gas without taking the foot off the pedal.
 

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Yeah, we all got a good laugh over that one. I think Live2wheel laughed louder than me! I kept that shirt as a momento to a great training day and a great lesson in persevering when things aren't going as you thought. . . NEVER. EVER. GIVE. UP or you'll have the rest of your life to think about it! 🤠
Speaking of….where what and how’s Live2wheel doing these days?
Anyone hear from him recently?
 

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I'm not a wordsmith.

I have no idea if Bob and I 'ride the reset' in the same way.

I learned my handgun skills in the service.

The corps isn't about artistry. It's about cookie cutter consistency. It take men and women from every walk of life and teaches them how to bring the rifle to shoulder, aim, 'squeeze' the trigger and hit the target.

Handgun 'training' is for e5s and officers, and let me tell you, you could be drunk and pass the course.

I did significant amounts of additional training. I do not remember ever being told to 'ride the reset', but when Bob talked about it, I realized that that was what I was doing, and I realized why.

Consistency and ease of cyclic trigger motion.

From my perspective, taking the finger off the trigger and finding it again increases the number of things that can go wrong.

Is it the only way to get that kind of consistency?

Nope, but darned if an objective review doesn't tell me that any other way requires more training to get the same result. It has to, there is more movement involved.

I saw you shoot. Are you telling me that you were taking the finger off the trigger and finding it again?

Say it and I'll believe you.
No sir, I mentioned earlier I don't "slap" the trigger like Leatham and Enos. I think I also mentioned they have shot 50K a month for decades [ sponsored so ammo and guns are free ] and came to slapping the trigger because both riding the trigger to reset had lost big prize money when they short stroked the trigger in their haste.

There's few who will shoot 6 rds a second, Leatham and Enos have split times run of .15/.16 [ 6 rds a second ] slapping the trigger. Not the way I run a trigger, but there's evidence in those two and others that it's possible to slap a trigger and be fast on the split times.

When I was shooting Tuesday night steel at the local range out here against grand masters like Leatham, and a host of master class shooters, I'd be about 40% slower than Leathams fastest times. I understood, to get to that level, I'd need to practice another 500K rds in a few years to get "there". Nah, I'm good with being 40% slower than the fastest competitor internationally ;)
 

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Speaking of….where what and how’s Live2wheel doing these days?
Anyone hear from him recently?
I think Artemis talks to him occasionally, but unfortunately, I haven't talked to him in probably 3-4 years. :(
 
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No sir, I mentioned earlier I don't "slap" the trigger like Leatham and Enos. I think I also mentioned they have shot 50K a month for decades [ sponsored so ammo and guns are free ] and came to slapping the trigger because both riding the trigger to reset had lost big prize money when they short stroked the trigger in their haste.

There's few who will shoot 6 rds a second, Leatham and Enos have split times run of .15/.16 [ 6 rds a second ] slapping the trigger. Not the way I run a trigger, but there's evidence in those two and others that it's possible to slap a trigger and be fast on the split times.

When I was shooting Tuesday night steel at the local range out here against grand masters like Leatham, and a host of master class shooters, I'd be about 40% slower than Leathams fastest times. I understood, to get to that level, I'd need to practice another 500K rds in a few years to get "there". Nah, I'm good with being 40% slower than the fastest competitor internationally ;)
Sir, don't call me sir. I work for a living :)
 

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Apologies, ma'am.
It's a military thing. I was an NCO. It's a not so subtle dig at each and every officer who automatically rates 'Sir', regardless if they actually deserve that level of respect or not.

and while I know that the whole 'identity' thing is part of woke culture, it isn't part of mine.

But if that is your culture, my pronouns are he/him.
 

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It's a military thing. I was an NCO. It's a not so subtle dig at each and every officer who automatically rates 'Sir', regardless if they actually deserve that level of respect or not.

and while I know that the whole 'identity' thing is part of woke culture, it isn't part of mine.

But if that is your culture, my pronouns are he/him.
Thanks for the heads-up. I was a paratrooper, where we must not have drawn such distinctions.
 

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It's a military thing. I was an NCO. It's a not so subtle dig at each and every officer who automatically rates 'Sir', regardless if they actually deserve that level of respect or not.

and while I know that the whole 'identity' thing is part of woke culture, it isn't part of mine.

But if that is your culture, my pronouns are he/him.
Been using that reply "I work for a living" when called sir nearly forever (y)
 

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The first time someone called me a "sir" in the Navy, I turned around to see who he was talking to! LOL!

I found it really weird to be called "sir" by an enlisted man who could have been my father.
 
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