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Andy:
You can find the reset on an UNLOADED pistol by holding the trigger to the rear (pulled) while you rack the slide. Then, slowly let the trigger move forward. You should be able to tell/hear when it resets. The trigger pull will probably feel lighter when you shoot from the reset, too.
I’ll try that. Doesn’t seem to effect my shooting times. But I don’t feel it the way I do the other guns.
 
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Discussion Starter · #23 ·
If the reset is at the mid-point of the trigger travel; so that’s a maybe yes, maybe no. 🤷🏻‍♂️
Doesn’t matter. Still a lot shorter than relaxing the finger to the trigger guard.
 

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Here is a decent demo of why I do not generally ride the trigger to reset between shots:

Thanks for the video. No one talked about pinning the trigger though.

riding the reset allows cyclic trigger movement. It is certainly not the only way to get it, but darned if its the wrong way ... unless you do it wrong :)

It's like many thing when it comes to shooting.
 

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Thanks for the video. No one talked about pinning the trigger though.

riding the reset allows cyclic trigger movement. It is certainly not the only way to get it, but darned if its the wrong way ... unless you do it wrong :)

It's like many thing when it comes to shooting.
I simply find it to be a bit slower than releasing the trigger between shots.
 

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I can pretty much tell you this:
In an actual gunfight, I'm likely to be scared shitless, and I probably won't be thinking much about trigger manipulation.
Follow your training.

It was the advice I was given.

Brownie's 'The mind is the limiting factor' has a whole ton of wisdom associated within just a few words.
 

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TBH I don’t really know what I do? But I also carry a 1911 which in and of itself is quicker than most other guns. I just shoot fast….?
In some of my guns the amount of movement to reset is so slight it’s almost imperceptible. The platform lends itself to quick follow ups. My finger however does stay on trigger the whole time.
 

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TBH I don’t really know what I do? But I also carry a 1911 which in and of itself is quicker than most other guns. I just shoot fast….?
In some of my guns the amount of movement to reset is so slight it’s almost imperceptible. The platform lends itself to quick follow ups. My finger however does stay on trigger the whole time.
I'm thinking it's a non-issue with 1911 triggers.
 

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The reason Rob Leatham and Brian Enos slap the trigger instead of keeping their finger on the trigger is

THEY'VE LOST MATCHES when their trigger wasn't released enough to rest. Two of the worlds fastest shooters get off the trigger completely between shots.

You CAN train yourself to be as fast slapping the trigger as keeping the finger on the trigger, history confirms it. It's not for everyone, but them most aren't shooting 50K rds a month and sponsored either.

All this back and forth on trigger reset, seems people end up shooting the way they shoot anyway. Hell, I didn't even know about trigger reset when shooting 5K a month between matches and practice for 5 years [ that's 300K in 5 years down range ]. Didn't even think about trigger reset on a 1911 that had a 2.5# trigger release, but whatever I was doing seemed good enough to take the money most of the time.

I was fortunate in that I didn't have to read through every ones idea of how to work a trigger, thus less clutter of the mind trying to follow someone's idea of how the trigger should be pulled. :rolleyes:
 

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The reason Rob Leatham and Brian Enos slap the trigger instead of keeping their finger on the trigger is

THEY'VE LOST MATCHES when their trigger wasn't released enough to rest. Two of the worlds fastest shooters get off the trigger completely between shots.

You CAN train yourself to be as fast slapping the trigger as keeping the finger on the trigger, history confirms it. It's not for everyone, but them most aren't shooting 50K rds a month and sponsored either.

All this back and forth on trigger reset, seems people end up shooting the way they shoot anyway. Hell, I didn't even know about trigger reset when shooting 5K a month between matches and practice for 5 years [ that's 300K in 5 years down range ]. Didn't even think about trigger reset on a 1911 that had a 2.5# trigger release, but whatever I was doing seemed good enough to take the money most of the time.

I was fortunate in that I didn't have to read through every ones idea of how to work a trigger, thus less clutter of the mind trying to follow someone's idea of how the trigger should be pulled. :rolleyes:
Nicely explained. Thanks.
 

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The reason Rob Leatham and Brian Enos slap the trigger instead of keeping their finger on the trigger is

THEY'VE LOST MATCHES when their trigger wasn't released enough to rest. Two of the worlds fastest shooters get off the trigger completely between shots.

You CAN train yourself to be as fast slapping the trigger as keeping the finger on the trigger, history confirms it. It's not for everyone, but them most aren't shooting 50K rds a month and sponsored either.

All this back and forth on trigger reset, seems people end up shooting the way they shoot anyway. Hell, I didn't even know about trigger reset when shooting 5K a month between matches and practice for 5 years [ that's 300K in 5 years down range ]. Didn't even think about trigger reset on a 1911 that had a 2.5# trigger release, but whatever I was doing seemed good enough to take the money most of the time.

I was fortunate in that I didn't have to read through every ones idea of how to work a trigger, thus less clutter of the mind trying to follow someone's idea of how the trigger should be pulled. :rolleyes:
and that's the 'trick', isn't it? Training so that you are as flawless as humanly possible and doing it without conscious thought?

It's isn't about 'thinking' your target dead.
 

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and that's the 'trick', isn't it? Training so that you are as flawless as humanly possible and doing it without conscious thought?

It's isn't about 'thinking' your target dead.
I've seen too many people with little to no training, who haven't fired all that many rounds downrange, be mentally frozen after reading/being told several opinions on how to pull a trigger, how to reset the trigger etc.

They spend more time fussing about if they are pulling a trigger correctly, resetting a trigger correctly than actually trying to get to just one more round per second [ say from 3 rds per second to 4 rds per second etc ].

Think back to the skills training in my pistol course. Did we discuss/spend anytime on trigger reset, how someone believes it should be mastered or all the ways discussed in this thread? Then think back about how many had problems unloading a mag one handed into a target at 3-4 rds per second. They couldn't all have been expertly trained on trigger reset, and if they were there was still one there who hadn't been, ME.
 

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Did we discuss/spend anytime on trigger reset, how someone believes it should be mastered or all the ways discussed in this thread?
As I recall... nothing at all was said about trigger manipulation. If you did, I imagine it would go something like this:

"Pull the ***king trigger! FAST!" :LOL: :ROFLMAO:

I don't think any of us had any problems with "split times." ;)
 

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As I recall... nothing at all was said about trigger manipulation. If you did, I imagine it would go something like this:

"Pull the ***king trigger! FAST!" :LOL: :ROFLMAO:

I don't think any of us had any problems with "split times." ;)
Any idea how many had problems with resetting their triggers at 3-4 rds per second in the course you attended?

None is the correct answer.

At 4 rds a second, I don't believe anyone can discern when the trigger reset happens, nor "feel" that trigger resetting. One would have to be capable of feeling the reset ever .25 seconds.

A typical hand gun slide moves approximately 4″ in about 55–65 milliseconds. .055-.065 seconds. If consciously waiting to feel the trigger reset at 4 rds a second, you're not making 4 rds a second.
 

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Any idea how many had problems with resetting their triggers at 3-4 rds per second in the course you attended?

None is the correct answer.

At 4 rds a second, I don't believe anyone can discern when the trigger reset happens, nor "feel" that trigger resetting.
Yep! I remember! I remember you saying, "I need SPEED. He wants to kill you. Get ON him NOW!"

LOL! I've got it on video!

But, you didn't discuss the intricacies of how you repetitively pull the trigger. There was no need.

I've been shooting Glock triggers so long (and riding the reset for so long), that it was instinctive to me (at your course). I had no issues with getting consecutive rounds off VERY quickly at your (most excellent) course.
 
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