Florida Concealed Carry banner
1 - 20 of 76 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
14,972 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
As a follow up on trigger control. Getting second and subsequent rapid accurate shots requires a trigger manipulation that sets up those shots. Trigger travel matters in this manipulation.
There are three schools of thought. Some believe in letting completely off the the trigger and letting it reset. Others will ride the trigger completely removing the finger from the trigger at the end of its release, then reconnecting. And then, there are those like me, that ride the trigger to the reset and start the take up instantly at the reset.
I have found by not disengaging the trigger finger from the trigger or letting the trigger move completely forward I can manipulate the proper rearward motion faster and more accurately. And yes, I know a run on sentence.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,458 Posts
As a follow up on trigger control. Getting second and subsequent rapid accurate shots requires a trigger manipulation that sets up those shots. Trigger travel matters in this manipulation.
There are three schools of thought. Some believe in letting completely off the the trigger and letting it reset. Others will ride the trigger completely removing the finger from the trigger at the end of its release, then reconnecting. And then, there are those like me, that ride the trigger to the reset and start the take up instantly at the reset.
I have found by not disengaging the trigger finger from the trigger or letting the trigger move completely forward I can manipulate the proper rearward motion faster and more accurately. And yes, I know a run on sentence.
That's the one I would strongly recommend against.

The other two both have their places for me.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
10,279 Posts
I don’t shoot from the reset, primarily because I use several different handguns for carry; depending on where I’m going, what I’m wearing, and so on.
That way, I know that whatever I’m carrying will reset properly.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
14,972 Posts
Discussion Starter · #4 ·

·
Registered
Joined
·
15,947 Posts
And then, there are those like me, that ride the trigger to the reset and start the take up instantly at the reset.
Exactly what I do. Funny... I showed that technique to @Anduril today.

"Ride the reset." Works great with Glocks, especially.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,845 Posts
As a follow up on trigger control. Getting second and subsequent rapid accurate shots requires a trigger manipulation that sets up those shots. Trigger travel matters in this manipulation.
There are three schools of thought. Some believe in letting completely off the the trigger and letting it reset. Others will ride the trigger completely removing the finger from the trigger at the end of its release, then reconnecting. And then, there are those like me, that ride the trigger to the reset and start the take up instantly at the reset.
I have found by not disengaging the trigger finger from the trigger or letting the trigger move completely forward I can manipulate the proper rearward motion faster and more accurately. And yes, I know a run on sentence.
Racer88, who shoots better than I do (that thing at 500 yards notwithstanding), gave me some pointers about trigger reset at the range today.

I can pretty much tell you this:
In an actual gunfight, I'm likely to be scared shitless, and I probably won't be thinking much about trigger manipulation.

Also, on the 10-yard pistol range today, I have a new-found respect for Mr. Dicken and those 40 yard shots he managed, preventing that mall shooting from getting any worse!!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,253 Posts
I got used to the trigger reset on the Glocks early on and use it every time to this day.

When I made the Glock/MechTech carbine, I still use the trigger reset.

It's automatic now and I don't even think about it.

It's all in what you're comfortable with and how much actually use it.

In my case it's 100% of the time by default.

AD
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
15,947 Posts
In an actual gunfight, I'm likely to be scared shitless, and I probably won't be thinking much about trigger manipulation.
It's automatic now and I don't even think about it.

It's all in what you're comfortable with and how much actually use it.

In my case it's 100% of the time by default.
Granted, I've not ever been in a gunfight, and hope I never am. I cannot realistically say what I would do.

But, like @ADulay, I've been riding the reset for so long, it's automatic. At @brownie's course, when the drill called for multiple shots (like the "zipper" drill), riding the reset makes for much quicker and more accurate follow-up shots.

When I do rapid-fire strings at the range, I'm riding the reset subconsciously at this point.

So, @Anduril ... keep practicing. It will become natural.

From my track days: "To go fast, first you must go slow."
Also: "Slow is smooth, and smooth is fast."
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
32,233 Posts
As a follow up on trigger control. Getting second and subsequent rapid accurate shots requires a trigger manipulation that sets up those shots. Trigger travel matters in this manipulation.
There are three schools of thought. Some believe in letting completely off the the trigger and letting it reset. Others will ride the trigger completely removing the finger from the trigger at the end of its release, then reconnecting. And then, there are those like me, that ride the trigger to the reset and start the take up instantly at the reset.
I have found by not disengaging the trigger finger from the trigger or letting the trigger move completely forward I can manipulate the proper rearward motion faster and more accurately. And yes, I know a run on sentence.
I'm definitely in the third group! (y) (y)
 
  • Like
Reactions: bttbbob

·
Registered
Joined
·
14,972 Posts
Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Exactly what I do. Funny... I showed that technique to @Anduril today.

"Ride the reset." Works great with Glocks, especially.
As anyone that gets very fast follow up shots does.
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
6,326 Posts
With the M&P FS and C I’m in the third group of riding the reset.

With the Shield 45, I can’t discern the reset point. I’ve only shot a few thousand rounds through it so maybe I’ll find it. Or the reset point is all the way out.
 
  • Like
Reactions: bttbbob

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,458 Posts
With the M&P FS and C I’m in the third group of riding the reset.

With the Shield 45, I can’t discern the reset point. I’ve only shot a few thousand rounds through it so maybe I’ll find it. Or the reset point is all the way out.
That's surprising. I own three of them, and the resets are distinctive on all three. It does vary a bit from one to the other, tho.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
57,033 Posts

"
Intentional Trigger Slap

World champs like Rob Leatham, and reportedly Todd Jarrett also, have picked up on this. They experimented with a controlled trigger slap, guaranteed to re-set the trigger. They found if the finger came straight back when it smacked the trigger for the next shot, it didn't significantly pull the muzzle off target. This rapid movement of the trigger finger is more of a simple gross motor skill compared to the fine motor skill of Riding the Link, and for them, Intentional Trigger Slap allowed faster shooting without appreciable degradation of hits on the 6"x9" A-zone of an IPSC target, or the 8" center circle of the IDPA silhouette. "


"
I wsa just watching a promo video for the Wilson EDC X9. Bill Wilson, no slouch at shooting, is slapping the hell out of the trigger. Finger coming out of the trigger guard with every shot, then coming back down on the trigger, instead of riding it to reset and pressing again.

I remember Rob Leatham saying something about "just slap the hell out of the trigger,"


I'm likely in the second group 99% of the time.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
15,947 Posts

"
Intentional Trigger Slap

World champs like Rob Leatham, and reportedly Todd Jarrett also, have picked up on this. They experimented with a controlled trigger slap, guaranteed to re-set the trigger. They found if the finger came straight back when it smacked the trigger for the next shot, it didn't significantly pull the muzzle off target. This rapid movement of the trigger finger is more of a simple gross motor skill compared to the fine motor skill of Riding the Link, and for them, Intentional Trigger Slap allowed faster shooting without appreciable degradation of hits on the 6"x9" A-zone of an IPSC target, or the 8" center circle of the IDPA silhouette. "


"
I wsa just watching a promo video for the Wilson EDC X9. Bill Wilson, no slouch at shooting, is slapping the hell out of the trigger. Finger coming out of the trigger guard with every shot, then coming back down on the trigger, instead of riding it to reset and pressing again.

I remember Rob Leatham saying something about "just slap the hell out of the trigger,"


I'm likely in the second group 99% of the time.
Welp... as my dad always said, "Don't argue with success." :)

I also like: If it's been done before, it is possible.
 
  • Like
Reactions: brownie

·
Registered
Joined
·
21,621 Posts
train as you fight...fight as you train...however you do it...make it a habit and automatic and you wont have to worry about it when you need it most...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
14,972 Posts
Discussion Starter · #17 ·
I will take a bet with anyone. I don’t care who it is. Let me instruct you in the technique of riding the reset vs slapping the trigger. I will put the gun in your hand and show you the technique. We will fire 20 rounds with my technique with me squeezing the trigger and riding the reset.
Then I will let you slap the trigger. I will bet anything, your times and scores will be higher riding the reset than slapping the trigger. Higher scores and faster times.
And I will bet whatever you want.
 
  • Like
Reactions: Old Farmer

·
Registered
Joined
·
14,972 Posts
Discussion Starter · #18 ·
These are facts and you cannot contest it.


1. Eliminates unnecessary motion. All motion equals time, and time is not on your side in a gunfight.
2. Minimizes movement of the sights thereby reducing time wasted realigning sights.
3. Helps reduce jerking of the trigger, which reduces the likelihood of missing.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
10,279 Posts
With the M&P FS and C I’m in the third group of riding the reset.

With the Shield 45, I can’t discern the reset point. I’ve only shot a few thousand rounds through it so maybe I’ll find it. Or the reset point is all the way out.
Andy:
You can find the reset on an UNLOADED pistol by holding the trigger to the rear (pulled) while you rack the slide. Then, slowly let the trigger move forward. You should be able to tell/hear when it resets. The trigger pull will probably feel lighter when you shoot from the reset, too.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
14,972 Posts
Discussion Starter · #20 ·
Andy:
You can find the reset on an UNLOADED pistol by holding the trigger to the rear (pulled) while you rack the slide. Then, slowly let the trigger move forward. You should be able to tell/hear when it resets. The trigger pull will probably feel lighter when you shoot from the reset, too.
And the travel will be half of its normal full travel.
 
1 - 20 of 76 Posts
Top