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Here is a post from another forum that I think every CCW permit holder should absolutely read and if possible follow. Link to original post

1- Always be armed
Always, without exception. Trouble doesn’t schedule an appointment before stopping by, and you should always be prepared for it. We don’t expect our house to burn down, but we keep fire extinguishers anyway. We don’t expect to wreck our car, but we click our seatbelts anyway. On that quick trip to the store we don’t expect to be assaulted, but we had better prepare for it anyway else we place ourselves at the mercy of others.

Example #1- While living in North Carolina I was walking to my kitchen at 1 am. As I rounded the corner wearing only a towel I found myself 5 feet away from a crack-head who was trying to force his way into my glass back door. I had to then make a mad dash back to my bedroom to retrieve a firearm, temporary leaving my kids’ bedrooms between myself and the crack-head. Had I been properly armed I would not have subjected myself and my children to this vulnerability. Having learned this lesson, I now take a Fobus paddle holster and a Glock to the bathroom with me. A Fobus paddle works great in a tightly wrapped towel for that walk from the shower to your bedroom.

Example #2- In another incident I was loading my 2 year old daughter into her car seat in the back of my Jeep Wrangler when I noticed a look of fear on her face. She was terrified and pointing behind me. Instinctually I drew my handgun as I turned to find 4 men who had formed a semi-circle around me. Had I not been armed I’m quite certain that I would have lost my money, my vehicle, possibly my life, and worst of all most likely my daughter who was buckled into the back seat.

With a firearm you at least have a chance. If you don’t have a firearm you’re at the will of those who do. Choose the largest caliber that you can shoot effectively and dress around it. Always, without exception.


2- Remain alert and aware
No matter the situation, your first and best option is always to avoid trouble. This is possible only if you are aware of your surroundings. No weapon can protect you if you didn’t see the first strike coming. Continually scan your surroundings and observe anything that appears threatening or out of place. Whenever possible, identify and assess a potential threat before it becomes a full blown threat. In the event that you cannot avoid trouble, at least you can prepare for it.

Remain aware while focused on other tasks. When you must pay attention to some other task (such as entering/exiting your vehicle) continue to scan and observe your surroundings. It’s easy to get distracted while loading bags of groceries or buckling your child into your car seat. In all reality these are the times when you should be paying special attention to your surroundings, as predators tend to prey on you when they know you’re distracted (see Rule #1, Example #2). I recently witnessed a lady loading Christmas packages into her SUV. She first buckled her child into her car seat, cranked her SUV to get the heater going, and then proceeded to load the packages in the back. When she finished she then took her cart 100 feet or so to the cart return, totally oblivious to anything that was going on with her child or vehicle. Although nothing bad happened, the gross vulnerabilities to both her child, her vehicle, and even to herself were inexcusable.


3- Practice
Proficiency is critical to survival. Emergency situations rarely afford adequate time to think a situation through completely. Should you find yourself justified in using deadly force to stop an illegal attack you must be able to draw and fire your weapon instinctually and effectively without pause or delay from your own limitations or ineptness. Tactical maneuvers are just as important as marksmanship, and both should be practiced together. Practice marksmanship first. Once you’ve mastered your ability to hit your target effectively, practice drawing your weapon. Practice stealth draws as well as speed draws. Once you’ve mastered drawing your weapon, practice tactical maneuvers. Draw your weapon and fire two shots into your target. Reassess the remaining threat level, and then re-holster your weapon. Repeat this as many times as it takes to master this sequence with both good speed and good accuracy. Once proficient, set up multiple targets with varying ranges. Practice drawing your weapon, fire 1-2 shots center mass into each target, and reassess the remaining threat before re-holstering your weapon. Repeat this proceedure as many times as you can. Don’t try to rush speed. Speed will come naturally with practice. Purchase an air-soft gun similar to your carry weapon. Practice holding your air-soft weapon on target while you travel forward, backwards, laterally, and while you walk up and down steps. Once you master it with air-soft, repeat your training with your carry weapon. Once you have truly mastered tactical maneuvers with your weapon, continue to train. If you don’t continue to practice you will lose the skills you worked so hard to gain.


4- Remain sober
Not only do drugs (prescription, illegal, alcohol, etc.) slow your reaction times, they also hinder your judgment as well as your awareness (which violates rule #2). Anyone taking any type of drug should not be carrying a firearm anyway (which violates rule #1).


5- Secure your perimeter
No matter where you are, secure your immediate perimeter. Whether traveling in your vehicle or sitting on your couch watching the game make certain that your doors are locked. Get a security system and arm it. Although you’ll need to bypass motion sensors while you’re inside your home, at least you’ll have door and window sensors armed. Small dogs don’t offer much protection, but they tend to be the most aware and will let you know that trouble is coming before larger dogs sense it. The most ideal recommendation I could give would be two German Shepherds outside with a Pomeranian, electronic burglar alarm, and firearms inside.

Few parts of our routine make us as vulnerable as showering. While necessary, it focuses our attention as well as blocks our senses. It’s difficult to hear over the water, and difficult to see through the steam and curtain. This is why shower scenes are included in so many horror movies. When I shower I take a firearm and a dog into the bathroom with me (although the dog comes along on her own). I lock my bathroom door, keep a Glock on the toilet tank, and use a clear shower curtain.


6- Avoid crowds
Sometimes this is obviously impossible, but when possible it’s advisable. Bad things happen in large crowds, and most organized events have strict policies against carrying firearms anyway (in violation of Rule #1).


7- Face the threat
Sit with your back against the wall so that you can see anyone who walks into the room.

Avoid urinals. While standing at a urinal not only is your back to the room but you're typically so focused on what’s directly in front of you that you’re completely oblivious to what anyone is doing directly behind you. Use a stall instead, and close/lock the door behind you. While this may seem like trapping yourself in, at least you'll be facing forward when you open the door to exit the stall, thus paying attention to anyone else in the room.


8- Blend in
If you find trouble in a crowded place, try to blend in as much as possible with others without drawing any undue attention as attention draws fire and makes a stealth draw more difficult.


9- Avoid walking while talking on a cell phone
Cell phones tend to make us oblivious to our surroundings, thus violating rule #2. We have laws against driving and cell phone usage for the same reason.


10- Keep strong arm free
While carrying bags to your vehicle try to keep your strong arm free. In the event of a stealth draw it’s much more conspicuous to sit your bags down to draw a weapon than it is to simply draw your weapon.
 

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Thoughts on personal security

These thoughts are right on! We need to continually remind ourselves to be more vigilant.

Thanks for the reminder.

Safe and sane shooting everyone,

johnstuf
 

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The first thought that goes through your head when you read this is that its a little extreme. Then on further thought, when was the last time you were able to acurately predict when something bad was going to hapen to you. So to even the odds the best thing to do is to always be armed.
I'm trying to do this now but its not as easy as it mght seem however with time it should become second nature.
 

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We tend to do so many things intently to enhance our lives. Nice cars, homes, electronics and such. However when it comes to security for our families and belongings we leave it up to other people to keep us safe. Does that seem sensible? I don't think so. This article covers most if not all that one could do to make oneself as safe as possible. I have read it before but it was good to read it again. If citizens put as much time in security as they do other things I believe the crime rate would be lower.
 

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As I read through that...my experience was this...
I found myself realizing that after 15 years of carrying concealed...many of those suggestions are second nature to me...and a few were things that I know I should be doing...but don't always...as they are not habits.

As far as #9 goes...I have practiced the ability to drive/walk while on the phone...while also remaining very, even acutely aware of my surroundings BECAUSE the act of being on the phone is the same as having a physical impairment...thereby requiring a higher sense of awareness...but it literally is something I had to consciously practice for it to become my habit.
 

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Situational awareness is key for me. And though it's something that can SORT of be trained, via self-defense and martial arts instruction, to me it's much more of a general mindset.

This includes general awareness of your surroundings, awareness of yourself, and identification of potential threats around you.

Gavin de Becker's "The Gift of Fear" is a very good book on learning how to trust your instincts, though he is fairly anti-gun. I just ignore any bits where he's talking about his views on guns. "Protecting the Gift" is a bit redundant, as it's very much a repeat of the material in "The Gift of Fear", so don't bother with it.

Training helps, but mindset and attitude are more important for me.

-JT
 

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I bought a smart carry so that I can carry all day while at home. Whats the point of having a gun you can't get to it in time, including while in the shower. I keep mine on a shelf with the door open (so I can hear and vent moisture), plus I run the fan so its keep the humidity low.
 

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Great points. I think I'm gonna copy them and post them as a daily reminder.
 

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Valid points.

But I think if you feel the need to clip a paddle holster to your towel when you get out of the shower, you may want to work on your perimeter security. :laughing
 

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Always Armed

I have carried so long I don't really think about putting my holster on my belt

when I shower and change pants. It's as routine as brushing my teeth.

I carry everywhere, and do not think about printing, or even if someone may

say something to me about it. It's about 2 Oclock and really don't print

anyway with the shirt out.

However, I am quite aware of the times, and will defend myself, family, and if

necessary someone else.
 

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#10 is my biggest concern because quite frankly it is not practical in every day living.

I do the vast majority of the shopping for our household. The only time we send the dh is when we want junk food in the house.

Anyway, I cross carry with my little LCP on my left hip. I carry my purse in my right hand because I'm left-handed as it is easier when I need to sign for stuff and because I use my left hand the majority of the time for stuff. I shoot right handed though. I've been practicing carrying my purse in my left hand to keep my right hand free. Don't tell me not to carry a purse. That is simply unrealistic.

I've been making a conscience effort to carry my purse in my left hand even though it is very awkward. When I need to take bags of groceries out I load it up as much as I can in my left hand but invariably there is always a bag or two that can easily go in my right hand but then it is not free anymore. You can forget grocery service when there are only a few bags because they look at you like you are stupid when you ask for help out with your groceries. Yes, I know I can demand that they help me out with my groceries but to what extent to do I do this? I only shop in the day light hours for many reasons.

I know this is mostly a girl question but you men need to know what your women go through. It's never as convenient as it is for you guys. Even when I take the grocery cart to the car there is the vulnerable part of unloading the groceries to the back of the car. Do I use my left hand for everything and keep the right hand free or do I use both hands and get it done twice as fast to get out of the parking lot?

Do I venture to ask if any of you do the grocery shopping for your household?

Any insight will be welcome.

MamaBear
 

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#10 is my biggest concern because quite frankly it is not practical in every day living.

I do the vast majority of the shopping for our household. The only time we send the dh is when we want junk food in the house.

Anyway, I cross carry with my little LCP on my left hip. I carry my purse in my right hand because I'm left-handed as it is easier when I need to sign for stuff and because I use my left hand the majority of the time for stuff. I shoot right handed though. I've been practicing carrying my purse in my left hand to keep my right hand free. Don't tell me not to carry a purse. That is simply unrealistic.

I've been making a conscience effort to carry my purse in my left hand even though it is very awkward. When I need to take bags of groceries out I load it up as much as I can in my left hand but invariably there is always a bag or two that can easily go in my right hand but then it is not free anymore. You can forget grocery service when there are only a few bags because they look at you like you are stupid when you ask for help out with your groceries. Yes, I know I can demand that they help me out with my groceries but to what extent to do I do this? I only shop in the day light hours for many reasons.

I know this is mostly a girl question but you men need to know what your women go through. It's never as convenient as it is for you guys. Even when I take the grocery cart to the car there is the vulnerable part of unloading the groceries to the back of the car. Do I use my left hand for everything and keep the right hand free or do I use both hands and get it done twice as fast to get out of the parking lot?

Do I venture to ask if any of you do the grocery shopping for your household?

Any insight will be welcome.

MamaBear
MamaBear, I do ALL the shopping for us. I'm right handed, but do the majority of things left handed. The only two things I really do right handed is write and shoot.

Two things that might help. Get a strap or a purse that allows you to carry your purse cross-shoulder instead of having to carry it in hand (prevents purse grabbings too). Use a shopping cart to keep your hands free.

When I leave the store, if there's more than I can carry with my left hand, I use a cart. Not real manly, I know, but my right hand is free to do what needs doin'. Plus, if it comes to it, a cart is a portable shield. It won't stop bullets, but it'll buy you some time and help create distance if needed.

At the car, use both hands and load and go, but keep your head on a swivel.

Carrying a weapon and taking responsibility for yours and your family's safety sometimes requires a little forethought and innovation to get the mundane stuff taken care of without exposing yourself or them to undue risk.

I'm no expert by any means, these are just some observations my wife and I have made over the last 15 years.

HTH
 

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Ok, I admit it. I grocery shop sometimes when my wife cant make it. Or if I get hungry enough. I personally try to get loaded as fast as possible so as to limit my exposure time in the parking lot. I do however scan the parking lot from the time I leave the front door of the store till I am loaded and moving. I am watching between cars as I am going to mine, looking for someone hiding or waiting for an easy target. I am constantly looking around me. I also watch for stuff placed on my windows such as flyers and such which tips me off that someone is close by. When I have opened my door, one quick look around and load 2-4 bags and look again, untill everything is loaded. I am sorry, But I am the idiot that most of the time does not return the cart to the cart coral. I do not leave my car again. I move it somewhere near the car where it wont roll into a car. That is unless there are not to many cars around me. I also look into my vehicle before I unlock the door, this is easy cause its a pickup. I have been approached a number of times, but I always saw them coming from a distance and have never been suprised. Usually someone looking for spare change. I always move towards them when I know they are coming so I am ot cornered in between 2 cars. Anyway, That is how I approach parking lots. I would welcome any critiqes.............john
 

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#10 is my biggest concern because quite frankly it is not practical in every day living.
MamaBear
MB, I think we all accept that there are limits to the precautions that we take. In the original article, the writer went so far as to wear a gun with his bath towel in his own home. Most of the rest of us stop well short of that. You weigh the risks and do the best you can. But you've gotten some good suggestions already. Using a cart and a shoulder bag with a strap strike me as being really good measures.
 

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MB, I think we all accept that there are limits to the precautions that we take. In the original article, the writer went so far as to wear a gun with his bath towel in his own home. Most of the rest of us stop well short of that. You weigh the risks and do the best you can. But you've gotten some good suggestions already. Using a cart and a shoulder bag with a strap strike me as being really good measures.
We do? I guess I shouldn't mention that new IBR holster I just ordered from Little Bear (Inside the Bath Robe)! :D no, pics will NOT be following
 

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Keeping ones gun hand free while important is not as important as maintaining situational awareness. Handle your task just DON'T allow a task (such as loading groceries) to become the sole center of you attention. Maintaining your situational awareness will give you the time and opportunity to properly act to any potentially hostile individual or event.
 

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"I drew my handgun as I turned to find 4 men who had formed a semi-circle around me."

I don't think I'd EVER draw before looking. Could have been 4 cops behind him and he'd now be dead.
 

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Keeping ones gun hand free while important is not as important as maintaining situational awareness. Handle your task just DON'T allow a task (such as loading groceries) to become the sole center of you attention. Maintaining your situational awareness will give you the time and opportunity to properly act to any potentially hostile individual or event.
Thank you SGB,

I do this all the time but still try to fine tune my 'routine' errands. One can never get too comfy going to their familiar haunts. That's when you let your guard down because 'nothing has ever happened here' before.

I do try to work my errands into pretty much the same stores so going somewhere new puts me out of my comfort zone. Your reminder of situational awareness is spot on.

MamaBear
 

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Thank you SGB,

I do this all the time but still try to fine tune my 'routine' errands. One can never get too comfy going to their familiar haunts. That's when you let your guard down because 'nothing has ever happened here' before.

I do try to work my errands into pretty much the same stores so going somewhere new puts me out of my comfort zone. Your reminder of situational awareness is spot on.

MamaBear
That's a good practice, MamaBear. There are a lot of little routines we have during the day where we're simply not thinking at all. Our minds are wandering about a thousand other things than what we're doing or where we are, because the task has essentially become muscle memory.

I saw something a few months back that stated attacks on people while they left or entered their homes were increasing, including daylight attacks. Watch your neighbors when they leave or come home. See how their thoughts are on digging in their purses or wallets for keys, fumbling with items on their return to the home. See how so many are obviously spaced out as their minds are firmly entrenched somewhere else. Then you see how the bad guys find their targets.

I have a slight advantage, being borderline clinically paranoid :D

Just because you're paranoid, it doesn't mean someone isn't out to get you.

-JT
 

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SGB;

Keeping ones gun hand free while important is not as important as maintaining situational awareness.

Everything fits together to develop ones personal security. I agree with the above statement as SGB mentions both as important.

Situational Awareness: There's a subject that can take volumes of pages to discuss in and of itself. It's understanding what you are seeing that's gong to be the hardest part of being aware. Many people see things and don't comprehend what they are seeing. This suggests that situational awareness needs to be accompanied with comprehension of what may be developing as well.

Learning Pre-assault Behavioral Patterns should be adjunct to situational awareness. One can "see" and perhaps not "understand" or comprehend soon enough what they are observing.

I don't always keep my gun hand free. Most are not as proficient at some tasks with their off hand as their strong hand, and unless one is going to train themselves to be ambi-dextrous in everything in life, there are going to be times the strong hand is used and occupied.

Just because the strong hand is occupied does not mean you are more vulnerable either. One has to consciously be ready to drop/release whatever is in their strong hand and deal with the more important matter whenever the situation demands that.

Brownie
 
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