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It's 3:00 a.m. Your children are screaming and your dog is lying dead in a pool of blood. Scorch marks and shattered glass cover the floor. You're being held at gunpoint by towering figures wearing black and holding M-16s.

This isn't a Hollywood movie set. Odds are this is a predawn SWAT raid conducted by the local police force targeting a family of color. Mission objective: search the home for a small amount of drugs.

Right now, a twenty-month-old toddler named Baby Bou Bou is recovering after a SWAT officer in Georgia threw a flashbang grenade into his crib. The grenade blew a hole in his chest that has yet to heal. Doctors are still unable to fully assess lasting brain damage. This unnecessary tragedy demands immediate action.

Community members, faith leaders, and elected officials across the aisles are building a movement to limit the use of SWAT to situations in which such aggressive tactics are truly necessary to save a life. This would be the first effort of its kind and set a precedent for other states.

There are an estimated 45,000 SWAT raids every year. That means this sort of violent, paramilitary raid is happening in about 124 homes every day—or more likely every night—not in an overseas combat zone, but here in American neighborhoods.

The police, who are supposed to serve and protect communities, are instead waging war on the people who live in them.

We can no longer accept such brutal tactics as a routine way to fight the War on Drugs. It's time for an exit strategy. And we cannot wait till the Georgia Legislature next meets in 2015.

Will you call on the Georgia State Legislature to declare an emergency session to limit the use of SWAT to situations in which it's truly necessary to save a life?

It does not have to be this way. We can make sure that police honor their mission to protect and serve, by ensuring that hyper-aggressive military tools and tactics are only used in situations that are truly "high risk."

It's time for the police to remember that our neighborhoods are not warzones and they shouldn't be treating us like the enemy.

Let's start with Georgia. We can address this problem now, before more kids are brutalized by excessive militarization.

Thank you for taking action,
Anthony Romero for the ACLU Action team
http://www.aclu.org/war-comes-home-excessive-militarization-american-policing?emsrc=Nat_Appeal_AutologinEnabled&emissue=crimjustice&emtype=petition&ms=eml_acluaction_140703_militarization
 

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What a bunch of crap.

It's time for the police to remember that our neighborhoods are not warzones and they shouldn't be treating us like the enemy.
Ahh, I don't think they are treating me like the enemy. I think they are treating bad people like the enemy.

We can no longer accept such brutal tactics as a routine way to fight the War on Drugs. It's time for an exit strategy.
Then suggest an alternative. Maybe we should have DD(drug dealer) meetings. That way they can stand up and say their name and get hugs from all of the other dealers in the area. That should put an end to it.

There are an estimated 45,000 SWAT raids every year. That means this sort of violent, paramilitary raid is happening in about 124 homes every day—or more likely every night—not in an overseas combat zone, but here in American neighborhoods.
So let's look at the statistics and number all of the ones that went bad. I know I know, one bad SWAT raid is one too many right? So we should stop them, and just allow the drugs on the street. I mean, weed is legal in some states now, let's just make them all legal.

I could go on and on. Once again, this is just my opinion. :)
 

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IMHO when civilian cops play with miltary toys, bad things happen. You want to wear cammies and throw flashbangs, sack up and make it through boot camp and ITS if you're able . Does that 2 year old count as "bad people"? His life is ruined because some Richard Cranium had army fantasies
 

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IMHO when civilian cops play with miltary toys, bad things happen. You want to wear cammies and throw flashbangs, sack up and make it through boot camp and ITS if you're able . Does that 2 year old count as "bad people"? His life is ruined because some Richard Cranium had army fantasies

agreed.
 

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IMHO when civilian cops play with miltary toys, bad things happen. You want to wear cammies and throw flashbangs, sack up and make it through boot camp and ITS if you're able . Does that 2 year old count as "bad people"? His life is ruined because some Richard Cranium had army fantasies
Yup I concur.
 

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What a bunch of crap.



Ahh, I don't think they are treating me like the enemy. I think they are treating bad people like the enemy.



Then suggest an alternative. Maybe we should have DD(drug dealer) meetings. That way they can stand up and say their name and get hugs from all of the other dealers in the area. That should put an end to it.



So let's look at the statistics and number all of the ones that went bad. I know I know, one bad SWAT raid is one too many right? So we should stop them, and just allow the drugs on the street. I mean, weed is legal in some states now, let's just make them all legal.

I could go on and on. Once again, this is just my opinion. :)
They screwed up bad.

They went after the house after a 50 purchase of drugs.....

If you watched the video the mini van in the front yard had those stupid stick figure family profiles on them including a kid in a stroller.

Dude 50 bucks doesn't even hardly buy you decent weed now a days. I'm out of the scene waiting for when its legal for me to enjoy it again.

PLUS THE MAIN THE STORY THE GUY THEY WERE LOOKING FOR WASN'T EVEN THERE!.

So yes its a waste of money and time.

Just like they did when the LEO were enforcing alcohol Prohibition.
 

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I know I know, one bad SWAT raid is one too many right? So we should stop them, and just allow the drugs on the street. I mean, weed is legal in some states now, let's just make them all legal.
I'd be OK with that. The notion that legalizing drugs will make things worse in this country has absolutely no merit and no data to support it. In fact, the exact opposite has been shown to be true with the historical example of Prohibition.
 

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Will the Right acknowledge the scale of the threat, applying its usual mistrust of power to a favored group, or will its usually alert advocates leave themselves willfully in the dark until, one day, a flashbang with their name on it is tossed through the window to wake them up with a start?
http://www.nationalreview.com/article/381446/barney-fife-meets-delta-force-charles-c-w-cooke

http://www.shtfplan.com/headline-news/10-facts-about-the-swatification-of-america-that-everyone-should-know_06262014
#1 In 1980, there were approximately 3,000 SWAT raids in the United States. Now, there are more than 80,000 SWAT raids per year in this country.

#2 79 percent of the time, SWAT teams are deployed to private homes.

#3 50 percent of the victims of SWAT raids are either black or Latino.

#4 In 65 percent of SWAT deployments, “a battering ram, boot, or some sort of explosive device” is used to gain forced entry to a home.

#5 62 percent of all SWAT raids involve a search for drugs.

#6 In at least 36 percent of all SWAT raids, “no contraband of any kind” is found by the police.

#7 In cases where it is suspected that there is a weapon in the home, police only find a weapon 35 percent of the time.

#8 More than 100 American families have their homes raided by SWAT teams every single day.

#9 Only 7 percent of all SWAT deployments are for “hostage, barricade or active-shooter scenarios”.

#10 Even small towns are getting SWAT teams now. 30 years ago, only 25.6 percent of communities with populations between 25,000 and 50,000 people had a SWAT team. Now, that number has increased to 80 percent.
 

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This is what I agree with:

Pedro Vargas set fire to his South Florida apartment last Saturday, killed six innocent people, including a seventeen year old girl, and held two others hostage at gunpoint for three hours before a Hialeah SWAT team stormed the complex, broke into the barricaded apartment, and fatally shot Vargas.

Overkill? Hardly.“Our procedure is that we don’t wait, we enter and engage,” a Hialeah police spokesman told a reporter. “We believe that it was our pursuing him that made him run for cover and barricade himself in that apartment, and kept him from killing more people.”

Libertarian journalist Radley Balko has been making hay over the supposed militarization of the police. In a raft of television interviews, op-eds, and other appearances promoting his new book on the subject he laments the Rise of the Warrior Cop, listing a series of SWAT team raids gone wrong. Some of Balko’s examples are certainly indefensible examples of untrained officers or unprofessional police conduct, sometimes resulting in horrible and tragic results.

Certainly, the police should be the first to safeguard citizens’ constitutional protections under the Bill of Rights, but the few bad examples Balko uses to make his case are vastly outnumbered by successful SWAT operations that save innocent lives and prevent further crimes.

Police work is dangerous. In 2012 alone, 120 U.S. law enforcement officers were killed in the line of duty, and thousands more were threatened and wounded. Violent, heavily armed felons, sometimes high on PCP or other drugs, confront police somewhere in the country on a daily basis. Oftentimes a highly-trained and professional SWAT team is the only way to neutralize the criminal, saving innocent lives and protecting the safety of law enforcement officers in the process.

Balko is critical of the trend toward the “militarization” of local police. He is right that police are more heavily armed than they once were, that many departments use flak jackets, gas masks, and other protective military-type equipment. They are often armed with military weapons, armored personnel carriers, and even small tanks.

Most such equipment is military surplus, usually compliments of the US government. Is it necessary? Few people objected to the use of such materiel in the Boston Marathon bombing case, even in liberal Massachusetts, and are unlikely to object when their own safety and lives are at stake. And after listening to Balko, one would think that police are outfitted like the Delta Force all of the time--which is hardly the case.

SWAT teams do serve a legitimate purpose but, like anything else, can be misused.Good training is essential, as are guidelines that are specific as to when they should and should not be used. Perhaps most important is a highly trained and professional team leader who spends hour after hour training his men and who has the professional judgment that only comes with vast experience and training.

One of Balko’s examples, involving a confrontation between a veteran and local narcotics strike force in Utah, appears to be exactly on point and demonstrates a lack of essential training, judgment, and professionalism.

A man suspected of a nonviolent crime was at home, naked in his bed when a battering ram beat down his door to let in a dozen heavily armed SWAT team officers. The officers fired over 250 rounds and only hit their target twice, neither time lethally, while fully half the officers ended up getting wounded and one was killed. And the naked veteran? He fought off the police with a single 9-millimeter Beretta pistol.

Not only does this remind us that police officers are not exactly safe in these situations. This story is an obvious example of officers not having the necessary training. Well-trained officers are essential to suppressing violent criminals, but when they lack necessary skills they become dangerous to their communities and themselves.

The much-maligned Los Angeles SWAT teams--the first in the country--were started by Daryl Gates, who later became Chief of Police in Los Angeles. They have rescued hostages, arrested countless violent criminals, and helped turn back a tide of rising violence in the city. In 1984, they worked 24 hours on and 24 hours off schedules, providing security for the Olympics Summer Games. The LAPD’s SWAT team alone executes over 120 high-risk warrants each year and deals with more than 100 barricaded suspects.

In April 2009, Richard Poplawski began a shooting spree after police were called to his mother’s home over a domestic argument. He was armed with an AK-47, a shotgun, and three handguns and was also wearing a bulletproof vest. He killed three police officers and then engaged in a four-hour firefight with a Pittsburgh SWAT team, during which he fired some 600 rounds.

The SWAT team was able to take Poplawski down, with no harm coming to anyone outside of law enforcement. Team members received awards for valor. It was a case of necessary and justified force.

SWAT teams came into being as a result of the riots of the 1960s and a series of shootings that could not be dealt with by conventional police methods. One was Charles Whitman’s August 1966 rampage at the University of Texas. Perched from a bell tower, Whitman rained down bullets without interruption for an estimated 96 minutes. He killed 14 people and wounded dozens of others before police finally shot him in the head.

By all means, let us rein in excesses in local police work, sometimes abetted by the availability of federal funds. But let us not use those excesses as an excuse to disarm law enforcement. Well-armed, well-trained SWAT teams, carefully deployed, are essential because they work.
 

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Tights, not sure where you got that, but I tend to agree with the writers thoughts
I'll have to try to find it again. I started doing a bit of research to "dispute/counter" the 10 things in setscrews quoted material and I came across it. Instead of trying to make my point and have folks not understand properly, I thought I'd just post it. I think it was on breitbart somewhere.
 

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Tights, when you do find it, could you put a link in your original post and write a summary. This is so the forum doesn't get in trouble for copyright violations.
 

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Pedro Vargas set fire to his South Florida apartment last Saturday, killed six innocent people, including a seventeen year old girl, and held two others hostage at gunpoint for three hours before a Hialeah SWAT team stormed the complex, broke into the barricaded apartment, and fatally shot Vargas.

Overkill? Hardly.“Our procedure is that we don’t wait, we enter and engage,” a Hialeah police spokesman told a reporter. “We believe that it was our pursuing him that made him run for cover and barricade himself in that apartment, and kept him from killing more people.”

Libertarian journalist Radley Balko has been making hay over the supposed militarization of the police. In a raft of television interviews, op-eds, and other appearances promoting his new book on the subject he laments the Rise of the Warrior Cop, listing a series of SWAT team raids gone wrong. Some of Balko’s examples are certainly indefensible examples of untrained officers or unprofessional police conduct, sometimes resulting in horrible and tragic results.

Certainly, the police should be the first to safeguard citizens’ constitutional protections under the Bill of Rights, but the few bad examples Balko uses to make his case are vastly outnumbered by successful SWAT operations that save innocent lives and prevent further crimes.

Police work is dangerous. In 2012 alone, 120 U.S. law enforcement officers were killed in the line of duty, and thousands more were threatened and wounded. Violent, heavily armed felons, sometimes high on PCP or other drugs, confront police somewhere in the country on a daily basis. Oftentimes a highly-trained and professional SWAT team is the only way to neutralize the criminal, saving innocent lives and protecting the safety of law enforcement officers in the process.

Balko is critical of the trend toward the “militarization” of local police. He is right that police are more heavily armed than they once were, that many departments use flak jackets, gas masks, and other protective military-type equipment. They are often armed with military weapons, armored personnel carriers, and even small tanks.

Most such equipment is military surplus, usually compliments of the US government. Is it necessary? Few people objected to the use of such materiel in the Boston Marathon bombing case, even in liberal Massachusetts, and are unlikely to object when their own safety and lives are at stake. And after listening to Balko, one would think that police are outfitted like the Delta Force all of the time--which is hardly the case.

SWAT teams do serve a legitimate purpose but, like anything else, can be misused.Good training is essential, as are guidelines that are specific as to when they should and should not be used. Perhaps most important is a highly trained and professional team leader who spends hour after hour training his men and who has the professional judgment that only comes with vast experience and training.

One of Balko’s examples, involving a confrontation between a veteran and local narcotics strike force in Utah, appears to be exactly on point and demonstrates a lack of essential training, judgment, and professionalism.

A man suspected of a nonviolent crime was at home, naked in his bed when a battering ram beat down his door to let in a dozen heavily armed SWAT team officers. The officers fired over 250 rounds and only hit their target twice, neither time lethally, while fully half the officers ended up getting wounded and one was killed. And the naked veteran? He fought off the police with a single 9-millimeter Beretta pistol.

Not only does this remind us that police officers are not exactly safe in these situations. This story is an obvious example of officers not having the necessary training. Well-trained officers are essential to suppressing violent criminals, but when they lack necessary skills they become dangerous to their communities and themselves.

The much-maligned Los Angeles SWAT teams--the first in the country--were started by Daryl Gates, who later became Chief of Police in Los Angeles. They have rescued hostages, arrested countless violent criminals, and helped turn back a tide of rising violence in the city. In 1984, they worked 24 hours on and 24 hours off schedules, providing security for the Olympics Summer Games. The LAPD’s SWAT team alone executes over 120 high-risk warrants each year and deals with more than 100 barricaded suspects.

In April 2009, Richard Poplawski began a shooting spree after police were called to his mother’s home over a domestic argument. He was armed with an AK-47, a shotgun, and three handguns and was also wearing a bulletproof vest. He killed three police officers and then engaged in a four-hour firefight with a Pittsburgh SWAT team, during which he fired some 600 rounds.

The SWAT team was able to take Poplawski down, with no harm coming to anyone outside of law enforcement. Team members received awards for valor. It was a case of necessary and justified force.

SWAT teams came into being as a result of the riots of the 1960s and a series of shootings that could not be dealt with by conventional police methods. One was Charles Whitman’s August 1966 rampage at the University of Texas. Perched from a bell tower, Whitman rained down bullets without interruption for an estimated 96 minutes. He killed 14 people and wounded dozens of others before police finally shot him in the head.

By all means, let us rein in excesses in local police work, sometimes abetted by the availability of federal funds. But let us not use those excesses as an excuse to disarm law enforcement. Well-armed, well-trained SWAT teams, carefully deployed, are essential because they work.



"Most such equipment is military surplus, usually compliments of the US government." That would be tax payers.


SWAT teams came into being as a result of the riots of the 1960s and a series of shootings that could not be dealt with by conventional police methods. One was Charles Whitman’s August 1966 rampage at the University of Texas. Perched from a bell tower, Whitman rained down bullets without interruption for an estimated 96 minutes. He killed 14 people and wounded dozens of others before police finally shot him in the head.

Swat teams had nothing to do with shooting Charles Whitman! He was killed by "conventional police methods".
 

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I would rather take my chances with the Richard Poplawskis of the world and there be no prohibition than to flush the 4th amendment and live under the growing jack boot cop horde. End the no knock warrant service before it ends all respect and compliance with police. The cops are delusional of they really don't think there is no point at which they become seen as the greater threat. Happy gov and police dependence day folks..
 

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Pedro Vargas set fire to his South Florida apartment last Saturday, killed six innocent people, including a seventeen year old girl, and held two others hostage at gunpoint for three hours before a Hialeah SWAT team stormed the complex, broke into the barricaded apartment, and fatally shot Vargas.

Overkill? Hardly.“Our procedure is that we don’t wait, we enter and engage,” a Hialeah police spokesman told a reporter. “We believe that it was our pursuing him that made him run for cover and barricade himself in that apartment, and kept him from killing more people.”

Libertarian journalist Radley Balko has been making hay over the supposed militarization of the police. In a raft of television interviews, op-eds, and other appearances promoting his new book on the subject he laments the Rise of the Warrior Cop, listing a series of SWAT team raids gone wrong. Some of Balko’s examples are certainly indefensible examples of untrained officers or unprofessional police conduct, sometimes resulting in horrible and tragic results.

Certainly, the police should be the first to safeguard citizens’ constitutional protections under the Bill of Rights, but the few bad examples Balko uses to make his case are vastly outnumbered by successful SWAT operations that save innocent lives and prevent further crimes.

Police work is dangerous. In 2012 alone, 120 U.S. law enforcement officers were killed in the line of duty, and thousands more were threatened and wounded. Violent, heavily armed felons, sometimes high on PCP or other drugs, confront police somewhere in the country on a daily basis. Oftentimes a highly-trained and professional SWAT team is the only way to neutralize the criminal, saving innocent lives and protecting the safety of law enforcement officers in the process.

Balko is critical of the trend toward the “militarization” of local police. He is right that police are more heavily armed than they once were, that many departments use flak jackets, gas masks, and other protective military-type equipment. They are often armed with military weapons, armored personnel carriers, and even small tanks.

Most such equipment is military surplus, usually compliments of the US government. Is it necessary? Few people objected to the use of such materiel in the Boston Marathon bombing case, even in liberal Massachusetts, and are unlikely to object when their own safety and lives are at stake. And after listening to Balko, one would think that police are outfitted like the Delta Force all of the time--which is hardly the case.

SWAT teams do serve a legitimate purpose but, like anything else, can be misused.Good training is essential, as are guidelines that are specific as to when they should and should not be used. Perhaps most important is a highly trained and professional team leader who spends hour after hour training his men and who has the professional judgment that only comes with vast experience and training.

One of Balko’s examples, involving a confrontation between a veteran and local narcotics strike force in Utah, appears to be exactly on point and demonstrates a lack of essential training, judgment, and professionalism.

A man suspected of a nonviolent crime was at home, naked in his bed when a battering ram beat down his door to let in a dozen heavily armed SWAT team officers. The officers fired over 250 rounds and only hit their target twice, neither time lethally, while fully half the officers ended up getting wounded and one was killed. And the naked veteran? He fought off the police with a single 9-millimeter Beretta pistol.

Not only does this remind us that police officers are not exactly safe in these situations. This story is an obvious example of officers not having the necessary training. Well-trained officers are essential to suppressing violent criminals, but when they lack necessary skills they become dangerous to their communities and themselves.

The much-maligned Los Angeles SWAT teams--the first in the country--were started by Daryl Gates, who later became Chief of Police in Los Angeles. They have rescued hostages, arrested countless violent criminals, and helped turn back a tide of rising violence in the city. In 1984, they worked 24 hours on and 24 hours off schedules, providing security for the Olympics Summer Games. The LAPD’s SWAT team alone executes over 120 high-risk warrants each year and deals with more than 100 barricaded suspects.

In April 2009, Richard Poplawski began a shooting spree after police were called to his mother’s home over a domestic argument. He was armed with an AK-47, a shotgun, and three handguns and was also wearing a bulletproof vest. He killed three police officers and then engaged in a four-hour firefight with a Pittsburgh SWAT team, during which he fired some 600 rounds.

The SWAT team was able to take Poplawski down, with no harm coming to anyone outside of law enforcement. Team members received awards for valor. It was a case of necessary and justified force.

SWAT teams came into being as a result of the riots of the 1960s and a series of shootings that could not be dealt with by conventional police methods. One was Charles Whitman’s August 1966 rampage at the University of Texas. Perched from a bell tower, Whitman rained down bullets without interruption for an estimated 96 minutes. He killed 14 people and wounded dozens of others before police finally shot him in the head.

By all means, let us rein in excesses in local police work, sometimes abetted by the availability of federal funds. But let us not use those excesses as an excuse to disarm law enforcement. Well-armed, well-trained SWAT teams, carefully deployed, are essential because they work.



"Most such equipment is military surplus, usually compliments of the US government." That would be tax payers.


SWAT teams came into being as a result of the riots of the 1960s and a series of shootings that could not be dealt with by conventional police methods. One was Charles Whitman’s August 1966 rampage at the University of Texas. Perched from a bell tower, Whitman rained down bullets without interruption for an estimated 96 minutes. He killed 14 people and wounded dozens of others before police finally shot him in the head.

Swat teams had nothing to do with shooting Charles Whitman! He was killed by "conventional police methods".

SWAT was not started over the Whitman shooting. It was started in LA during the WATTS riots and the Black Panthers taking over city hall. You all that are taking up for these abortions are part of the problem. Only 7% of SWAT raids are done based on it's original doctrine. That means that 93% are done under the guise of civilian protection. I don't need this kind of protection. Although I have trained SWAT teams some would think I am hypocritical. Not the case at all. THis is buillsh*t. You wanna play RECON RANGER, sign your name on the dotted line, and go overseas to play these silly *ass games. This sh*t does not belong on my streets. We will see how long your wannabe *sses last. Versus assaulting innocent people. I guarantee I can find 10 f*cked up raids for every one you claim are right. The one you stated happened to be one of the good ones. Big deal, one of the 7%. What about the other raids when we are talking 80,000 a year. This is not Beirut.

I will repeat, you are a tool if you think that one officer or innocent civilians life is worth 100 lbs of dope. YOU ARE THE PROBLEM and why departments and judges get away with this crap.

In the mean time I will fight this in my local community tooth and nail. I am going in front of the Palm Beach County Commissioners meeting next month to try and cut my County Sheriffs budget just so this crap stops. And I know it may cost me a County contract.

I hope like hell all that approve of this crap are not on the end of a wrong address raid.
 

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SWAT was not started over the Whitman shooting. It was started in LA during the WATTS riots and the Black Panthers taking over city hall. You all that are taking up for these abortions are part of the problem. Only 7% of SWAT raids are done based on it's original doctrine. That means that 93% are done under the guise of civilian protection. I don't need this kind of protection. Although I have trained SWAT teams some would think I am hypocritical. Not the case at all. THis is buillsh*t. You wanna play RECON RANGER, sign your name on the dotted line, and go overseas to play these silly *ass games. This sh*t does not belong on my streets. We will see how long your wannabe *sses last. Versus assaulting innocent people. I guarantee I can find 10 f*cked up raids for every one you claim are right. The one you stated happened to be one of the good ones. Big deal, one of the 7%. What about the other raids when we are talking 80,000 a year. This is not Beirut.

I will repeat, you are a tool if you think that one officer or innocent civilians life is worth 100 lbs of dope. YOU ARE THE PROBLEM and why departments and judges get away with this crap.

In the mean time I will fight this in my local community tooth and nail. I am going in front of the Palm Beach County Commissioners meeting next month to try and cut my County Sheriffs budget just so this crap stops. And I know it may cost me a County contract.

I hope like hell all that approve of this crap are not on the end of a wrong address raid.

Reread the thread! I was replying to tights post. I am against the militarization of police departments. Did you even read my post?
 

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SWAT was not started over the Whitman shooting. It was started in LA during the WATTS riots and the Black Panthers taking over city hall. You all that are taking up for these abortions are part of the problem. Only 7% of SWAT raids are done based on it's original doctrine. That means that 93% are done under the guise of civilian protection. I don't need this kind of protection. Although I have trained SWAT teams some would think I am hypocritical. Not the case at all. THis is buillsh*t. You wanna play RECON RANGER, sign your name on the dotted line, and go overseas to play these silly *ass games. This sh*t does not belong on my streets. We will see how long your wannabe *sses last. Versus assaulting innocent people. I guarantee I can find 10 f*cked up raids for every one you claim are right. The one you stated happened to be one of the good ones. Big deal, one of the 7%. What about the other raids when we are talking 80,000 a year. This is not Beirut.

I will repeat, you are a tool if you think that one officer or innocent civilians life is worth 100 lbs of dope. YOU ARE THE PROBLEM and why departments and judges get away with this crap.

In the mean time I will fight this in my local community tooth and nail. I am going in front of the Palm Beach County Commissioners meeting next month to try and cut my County Sheriffs budget just so this crap stops. And I know it may cost me a County contract.

I hope like hell all that approve of this crap are not on the end of a wrong address raid.
first, this was not my writing, and I have included the link that took me a while to "re-find". Second, I see you are pretty passionate about this. I can accept that. What I don't accept is being called a "tool" if I don't have a problem with Swat teams being used in this country. I AM a veteran. How about this, you think I should go join the military to be a GI Joe wannabe, I did that once in my life. How about YOU go join the swat team and wear a pair of underwear and carry a nightstick and try to arrest someone high on meth that is selling it to your school children. Keep in mind, I'm not the one that started the name calling and "shouting" for lack of a better word. But i will not be talked down to because you think that YOU are right and I am wrong. Cheers mate, it's supposed to be a healthy discussion.
 

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first, this was not my writing, and I have included the link that took me a while to "re-find". Second, I see you are pretty passionate about this. I can accept that. What I don't accept is being called a "tool" if I don't have a problem with Swat teams being used in this country. I AM a veteran. How about this, you think I should go join the military to be a GI Joe wannabe, I did that once in my life. How about YOU go join the swat team and wear a pair of underwear and carry a nightstick and try to arrest someone high on meth that is selling it to your school children. Keep in mind, I'm not the one that started the name calling and "shouting" for lack of a better word. But i will not be talked down to because you think that YOU are right and I am wrong. Cheers mate, it's supposed to be a healthy discussion.
I would bet he meant fool. Probably not much better.
 
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