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Our member Mike1956 posted this link on FB. I read the article and decided it's worthy of discussion here.

"Other successful people take a different route. They get very good (like top 20%) at something and combine that skill with another skill in which they also have a top 20% rating. Most of these people have three or more skill sets where they are in the top 20% of their field, but no one else in the world has those exact combined skills. It makes those people even more unique than the world’s best performer at a single discipline."

"It’s much easier to get to the 80% level and then add another 80% skill to your repertoire than it is to reach the 99% level in a single discipline. It’s a much faster route to excellence than trying to get to be “the best” at any one skill."

Thoughts from the members?

 

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Thanks for linking this one, Brownie. I posted it on the other forum, and was getting ready to post it here.

The skills you teach immediately came to mind as I read through the article. By lunch time of the first day of your threat-focused class, I was already more proficient with them than many, if not most of the FSP instructors on the planet.
 

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The answer is never. It’s why we continue to work on the skills we have and add new ones.
Always the student
 

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You STOP learning the moment you think you know it all....

The student should always be striving to be better than the teacher.
 

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Looking forward to reading the article.

But, I see two answers to the question.

1. Good enough = survived the encounter.

2. Never settle for good enough = always learning and improving.


OK... I will read the article!
 

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That was an excellent article and I read it twice. I agree with it with minor exceptions. As an example, in certain endeavors people just seem to have a highly refined natural talent. i’ve always said that successful trial lawyers are born and not necessarily trained. If they have a genuine interest in fellow man, are respectful and not argumentative for no reason or insulting, they just seem to be more successful. The ones that show off and are obnoxious (quite a lot these days) May have a success or two but generally are unsuccessful.

Brownie taught that in his last class. He didn’t want complete X ring accuracy with every shot, I can’t remember but I thought he said something like an eight ring shot was perfectly acceptable. Then you moved to the next skill, movement before shooting. In law school, the top student got the book award in each class, that was kind of an honor. I never got a book award although my wife did but I’ve been very fortunate in my career applying those concepts of the 80% factor your article discussed.

In the legal field if you don’t know how to take a pretty good deposition, not a perfect one, you can’t build the basis for moving forward. If you can’t get along with opposing counsel and you curse and insult, you’ll never get any courtesy in return and if you don’t have a pretty good interest in your fellow man and in personal integrity, you’ll never make a very good trial lawyer. Jurors spot insincerity like my Chihuahua detects that I am eating a barbecue rib.

Likewise, in self-defense if you are all “gun centric“ you won’t be able to defend your family very well. If you don’t instinctively know a few pretty good hand to hand defensive techniques, you may wind up on your ass with the 4 o’clock pistol you carry having chipped a spinal bone. If you can’t control your emotions and reason your way out of a confrontation you will be useless to your wife and family.

Indeed, as brownie says, “the mind is the limiting factor“ if you don’t have the skills to reason your way or talk your way out of a confrontation at least at an 80% level and if you can’t combine that with the mental acuity to plan “if he does this, I’ll do that“ if you can’t keep a reasonably cool head and not fly off the handle, you become a liability, not a defender.

Great article, it was really thought-provoking for me, thank you both.
 

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Why? When I learn, I want to learn from the best. I don't have to beat the best.

Again, did you read the article?

Mike, I didn't say anything about beating the best...
I said to never stop learning, people can get dangerous when they think they know it all...
A student should always try their best, even striving to be better than their teacher.

Yes I read it, 2x
 
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Mike, I didn't say anything about beating the best...
I said to never stop learning, people can get dangerous when they think they know it all...
A student should always try their best, even striving to be better than their teacher.

Yes I read it, 2x
One of my takeaways (more of a validation) is that I don't need to spend time and effort that could be better spent learning and improving other skills trying to beat my teacher. I don't have a need or desire to become a better point-shooter than Brownie, just as a ferinstance. Why waste time and ammo trying? I am, however a better point shooter than 90-some percent of population, simply by spending a few hours in Brownie's classes and improving on what he taught me. Having learned those skills, I can now get back to learning Hebrew, again just as a ferinstance.
 

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can now get back to learning Hebrew, again just as a ferinstance.
Is that Hebrew? :LOL:

Reminds me of one of favorite stand-up bits by comedian Dennis Wolfberg.

"When I was a kid, my parents sent me to Hebrew school. And, my Hebrew school was SO tough...."

How tough was it?

"We had NUNS!"
 

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Our member Mike1956 posted this link on FB. I read the article and decided it's worthy of discussion here.

"Other successful people take a different route. They get very good (like top 20%) at something and combine that skill with another skill in which they also have a top 20% rating. Most of these people have three or more skill sets where they are in the top 20% of their field, but no one else in the world has those exact combined skills. It makes those people even more unique than the world’s best performer at a single discipline."

"It’s much easier to get to the 80% level and then add another 80% skill to your repertoire than it is to reach the 99% level in a single discipline. It’s a much faster route to excellence than trying to get to be “the best” at any one skill."

Thoughts from the members?

Yes. I know Greg personally and follow a lot of his stuff. This article is not one of his better ones. It is very contradictory.
The skill set is self defense. Anything else you use as a sub-discipline and is a subset of self defense. I don't care if it is rifle, pistol, shotgun or hand to hand. By feeling you are 80% in all disciplines, you have worked hard to improve your self defense skills. Since all of those disciplines are depreciating skills, you will work your whole life to improve and maintain them. If you are going out to any instruction or skill practice and say to yourself, well 80% is ok and works for me. That defeats the purpose of trying to improve my skill set.
Is there a point of diminishing return? Yes, but I contend the average person does not practice nor take enough instruction to achieve that level in their lifetime.

And why my statement always a student. I never go to a range or class with a self defeating attitude or that of enough is enough.
 
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Did you read the article? The title is generalized and subjective, while the content is much more focused.
read it before now and disagreed with it then. I have posted in answer to Brownie why.
 

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read it before now and disagreed with it then. I have posted in answer to Brownie why.
I'm not sure what you are disagreeing with. I too have known and trained with Greg for a number of years. He is easily one of my three favorite instructors (Brownie is also in that category). I found this particular article to be one of his best ever. Everyone has their favorites, just like everyone has their opinions.
 

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I'm not sure what you are disagreeing with. I too have known and trained with Greg for a number of years. He is easily one of my three favorite instructors (Brownie is also in that category). I found this particular article to be one of his best ever. Everyone has their favorites, just like everyone has their opinions.
I do not expect anyone or everyone to agree with me. I stated my reasoning.
 

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I'm thinking that Brownie's two-day threat focused class a few years ago put me up there in the top 5% or so of point shooters everywhere. If not, my own practice and skill development since then certainly did. My needs and priorities in that realm are such that I don't feel the urge to keep on keeping on until I reach the top one percent.
 

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I'm thinking that Brownie's two-day threat focused class a few years ago put me up there in the top 5% or so of point shooters everywhere. If not, my own practice and skill development since then certainly did. My needs and priorities in that realm are such that I don't feel the urge to keep on keeping on until I reach the top one percent.
I'm with you there, Mike. The course you're referring to included the FoF components, including the shoot-house scenarios, too, correct? :unsure:
 

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Yup, was at both of those, too and agree. Great article in the OP, if I didn't say so already! 👍👍
 
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