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Well, for better or worse, all this down time gives me a chance to post the projects I have been working on.

The Savage 24V was a over/under gun in the style of the old German Zweiling, with a shotgun barrel on the bottom and a rifle barrel on the top.

They were made in a variety of gauge and caliber offerings between 1950 and 2010 when they were discontinued.

This one was one of the hurricane guns. The gun itself was in fine shape, but the handguard had been broken at some point in the past, and had been poorly repaired using JB Weld.

Original Repair.

SavageRepair - 0.jpg

Since the fit was poor and there are gaps, it was possible to get the pieces separated again.

JB Weld softens with alcohol, so I soaked the area for a bit, and was able to get the piece off intact.

Once the pieces were apart, I had to get as much of the JB Weld out of of the wood as possible to get a good bond with Acraglas. Using a few dental tools, alcohol, and time, I was able to get about 98% of the JB Weld out of the wood.

Cleaned wood, you can see traces of the grey JB Weld packed in the grain of the wood.

SavageRepair - 2.jpg

I was able to get the pieces to dry fit pretty close.

SavageRepair - 1.jpg

Once all of the alcohol had evaporated, I mixed up some acraglas, dying it brown so it would blend a bit better.

SavageRepair - 7.jpg

I put a generous coating on both pieces and clamped them together. I used a piece of latex tubing to cushion the clamp, because Acraglas will not stick to latex.

SavageRepair - 3.jpg

SavageRepair - 4.jpg

After clamping, it was left to set overnight.

The next day I removed the clamp. There was good adhesion, but there had been some shrinkage.

SavageRepair - 5.jpg

After cleaning it up with files and sandpaper, You can clearly see where there are low spots.

SavageRepair - 6.jpg

Next Post.
 

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Part 2: Finished

Once I smoothed out the seam as much as possible, I mixed up another small batch of Acraglas and applied it, using a Popsicle stick to pack it into the seam. Since it does shrink as it cures, I put it on wider and thicker than really needed, but I wanted it flush with the wood, and it is easy to clean up.

SavageRepair - 8.jpg

Once it cured, I sanded it down so it was flush with the rest of the wood. Since I had confined my sanding just to the area that needed repair, that wood was now lighter than the rest of the handguard. So I started applying coats of raw linseed oil thinned with a bit of turpentine to darken the wood.

You can see that is is still lighter, but it is getting there...

SavageRepair - 12.jpg

Once the color was about as close as I would be able to get it, I let the oil cure for a few days, and then gave the whole handguard a few coats of Tung Oil Finish, which contains a varnish to seal the wood.

Once that had cured and buffed, it looked like it did before the repair, so I put the handguard back together.

Finished

SavageRepair - 13.jpg

As you can see, I was able to blend the colors pretty closely. The repair is still visible, but at least it cannot be felt if you run your hand along the guard.
 

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Excellent work as always. :thumsup
 

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Nice work Sir...... that’s an excellent repair job anyone would be happy with.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

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That was some great work, as usual.

I’d like to know why you chose to use Acraglas, which I always thought was primarily a bedding compound, as an adhesive, rather than say, an epoxy. Is the adhesion of Acraglas stronger than an epoxy, or is it just easier to work, and perhaps takes color more easily?

Thanks!

PS: I had one of those in 30-30/20 gauge, which I wish I’d held on to. :banghead
 

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Beautiful work as always! :2thumsup

Great question, Rick! :popcorn
 

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That was some great work, as usual.

I’d like to know why you chose to use Acraglas, which I always thought was primarily a bedding compound, as an adhesive, rather than say, an epoxy. Is the adhesion of Acraglas stronger than an epoxy, or is it just easier to work, and perhaps takes color more easily?

Thanks!

PS: I had one of those in 30-30/20 gauge, which I wish I’d held on to. :banghead
The first time I used it because it was suggested. :grin

It worked really well, and for an epoxy, it is very easy to work with.

Acraglas is an epoxy. The gel, which is what I use the most, has a mix ratio of 1:1. Undyed, the gel is a tan/orange color, but it comes with a small amount of very concentrated brown and black dye. In the pictures above, I added 2 tiny drops of brown dye to get that color. It has a 12 hour set time, so you have plenty of time to make adjustments if you have to.

Once it is cured, it is still soft and flexible for about another 8 - 12 hours, which makes it very easy to remove any blobs or overflow without having to take a lot of wood with it.

The same thing applies to the liquid version, except you it comes with fiberglass flocking for additional reinforcement. It is also thin enough to get it into very tight cracks.

Since it was initially made to bed stocks, it sticks to wood really well. A crack that is properly set and secured with pins, the repaired area is usually stronger than the wood around it.

It also comes with a bottle of release compound so the pieces and parts you don't want to stick to it, won't.

If you need additional strength, you can mix 1 part aluminum or steel powder to 3 parts Acraglas.

Lastly, it is pretty economical, the gel comes in two wide mouthed jars that are resealable, so if you do not use it all up on one job, it is still good provided the jars are kept sealed. I've bedded one stock and repaired 2 others before this one, and I still have some left.
 

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Great info, AFJuvat! :thumsup
 

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The first time I used it because it was suggested. :grin

It worked really well, and for an epoxy, it is very easy to work with.

Acraglas is an epoxy. The gel, which is what I use the most, has a mix ratio of 1:1. Undyed, the gel is a tan/orange color, but it comes with a small amount of very concentrated brown and black dye. In the pictures above, I added 2 tiny drops of brown dye to get that color. It has a 12 hour set time, so you have plenty of time to make adjustments if you have to.

Once it is cured, it is still soft and flexible for about another 8 - 12 hours, which makes it very easy to remove any blobs or overflow without having to take a lot of wood with it.

The same thing applies to the liquid version, except you it comes with fiberglass flocking for additional reinforcement. It is also thin enough to get it into very tight cracks.

Since it was initially made to bed stocks, it sticks to wood really well. A crack that is properly set and secured with pins, the repaired area is usually stronger than the wood around it.

It also comes with a bottle of release compound so the pieces and parts you don't want to stick to it, won't.

If you need additional strength, you can mix 1 part aluminum or steel powder to 3 parts Acraglas.

Lastly, it is pretty economical, the gel comes in two wide mouthed jars that are resealable, so if you do not use it all up on one job, it is still good provided the jars are kept sealed. I've bedded one stock and repaired 2 others before this one, and I still have some left.
Thank you Sir! That’s good information, for sure. :thumsup
 
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