Florida Concealed Carry banner

1 - 11 of 11 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,058 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
The Rossi Model 68 was introduced in 1978 and is an adaptation of the earlier Model 27 Pioneer revolver. The Model 68 has some slight improvements, such as an adjustable rear sight and a ramp front sight. It is a 5 shot revolver chambered in .38 Special round.

It is a close copy of the Smith and Wesson Model 36, and was produced under license from S&W on S&W machinery.

Stock photo of a Rossi 68.
View attachment 66125

This is another hurricane rescue gun that belongs to a former member here, Gatorade.

The gun was in bad shape on arrival with rust and pitting. Additionally, the cylinder lock was non-functional, which allowed the cylinder to free spin, and the cylinder hand only rotated the cylinder 50% of the time.

Since Gatorade wanted a snub-nose 38 as a possible carry gun, I took a shot at restoring it. While I have done some repairs on revolvers before, I have never completely gutted and refinished one before.

That which does not kill us.... etc.... :grin

This is the one and only "before" shot I took before completely taking it apart, but it gives you a good idea of what it looked like.

Rossi - 1.jpg

You can see that the cylinder lock, the object to the right of the trigger, is missing a spring, which would explain why it is not working correctly.
The cylinder hand is attached to the rear of the trigger. To the left of the trigger is the sear and sear spring, above that is the hammer.


Frame after taking all of the pieces and parts out, the cylinder crane is to the rear.

Rossi - 2.jpg

After the gun was apart, I got a spare lock spring and cylinder hand ordered, then it was time to start working on the finish.

I started with 120 grit sandpaper either mounted to a granite block or wrapped around a file to keep all of the flat surfaces flat, and used a foam rubber sanding block for the curved and contoured surfaces.

Frame after initial 120 grit sanding.

Rossi - 4.jpg

Other side

Rossi - 5.jpg

After getting as much pitting out as I could, I started with a finer grit, 220, 320, and 400.

Sideplate after 220 grit, you can see where roll stamping the Rossi logo caused a low spot in the metal.

Rossi - 3.jpg

To clean up the cylinder, I left the ejector installed, then chucked it in a drill. I held a piece of sandpaper backed with a felt block against it and started the drill.

Cylinder after sanding with 220 grit.
Rossi - 6.jpg

Once I sanded everything to 400 grit, I put the hammer and sideplate back on, as I wanted all of the polishing marks to be going in the same direction.

Just keep sanding....
Rossi - 9.jpg

The frame around the barrel and the barrel itself has some strange contours. At this point to continue sanding and polishing, it was just easier to remove the barrel. I drove the barrel pin out, then held the barrel in a wood jawed vice, and used a hammer handle through the cylinder frame to turn the frame off of the barrel.

Rossi - 13.jpg

Once the barrel was off, it was pretty simple to clean up the rest of the frame.

Barrel surface on the frame
Rossi - 14.jpg

Then I cleaned up the barrel where it meets the frame

Rossi - 15.jpg

Next post.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,058 Posts
Discussion Starter #2
Part 2: Bluing.

After polishing the parts up to 1000 grit, everything went into the ultrasonic cleaner with a mix of simple green and Dawn dish detergent.

Ultrasonic bath

Rossi - 16.jpg

After cleaning, the parts were rinsed and stored in denatured alcohol to remove all water and any leftover crud.

Rossi - 17.jpg

Broke out the rust bluing solution and the toaster oven. Heated the parts to 200 degrees, and sparingly applied the bluing solution.

Heating after the first application of bluing.

Rossi - 18.jpg

The metal turned a nice plum brown color, which indicates that the metal should blue up nicely.

Cylinder before boiling in distilled water.

Rossi - 20.jpg

After rusting and boiling three times, I heated the parts and soaked them in oil for a day for the bluing to set. I took the parts out of the oil the next day, wiped them down, and then soaked them in alcohol to degrease.

The big parts after cleanup.

Rossi - 22.jpg

Then it was time to put it back together again.

Frame with the trigger group installed.

Rossi - 28.jpg

Then installed the side plate, the front screw was left out because it secures the crane to the frame.

Rossi - 29.jpg

I installed the crane and cylinder, and tested the gun for proper function and locking. Then I remove the crane and cylinder again, and put the barrel back on.

Rossi - 31.jpg

Next post.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,058 Posts
Discussion Starter #3
Part 3: Finished

Once the barrel was back on, I put the cylinder and crane back, and put the grips back on.

Done.

Rossi - 32.jpg


Rossi - 33.jpg

Since no job is complete without a range report and full function check....

At the firing line with a box of wadcutters.

Rossi - 34.jpg

Loading for the first time.

Rossi - 35.jpg

Put on my gloves pointed it at the edge of the target at 10 yards turned my face away from the gun and pulled the trigger. After that shot, I shot it 32 more times. (I ran out of bullets).

It shoots a bit high and left, once I corrected for that, it turned out to be a pretty decent snub gun.

Rossi - 36.jpg
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,839 Posts
Wow, what a difference! Great little project and for the first revolver you have fully refinished, I’d say you out did yourself. Great write up!


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
26,332 Posts
Another excellent restoration thread. Really beautiful work bringing back a gun from significant hurricane damage! :2thumsup
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,839 Posts
Can I have it? My birthday is this year.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,058 Posts
Discussion Starter #10

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,839 Posts
:rofl

Not mine to give.
Lmao.... worth a try.

Looking back at the innards of this revolver, it looks pretty identical to a Smith (I know you mentioned it was made with Smith machines). Usually they change it up a little to make it “their own”.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 
1 - 11 of 11 Posts
Top