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Do you think a Reloading Class is something folks would be interested in?

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I have been considering completing the Certified Reloaders Instructors course through the NRA and putting on Reloading classes.

I see a lot of people on a buncha forums saying how they would "like" to get into reloading...but I think some folks are intimidated by the idea of going it alone.

What would you guys' opinion be of something like that?
 

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I'm unsure. It depends on the demographic of shooters in your area: what they shoot, how often they shoot, economic status, etc. Ammo prices and reloading materials (particularly, lead and brass) seem to keep going up, and if somebody shoots rifle, or larger caliber handguns, reloading is probably the way to go.

That initial cost, particularly if they're going for a good, progressive press, can be daunting. Not only do you have the cost of press and dies, but depending on what you're loading, you may have other equipment: case prep equipment, brass tumblers, scales, calipers, etc. Then you have your expendables, like powder, bullets, cases, and primers. You'd need a dedicated room or area for reloading, where you can be free from distractions, and a safe place to store the stuff that can go boom. Reloading manuals. Must have.

I'm by NO means trying to put anyone off of reloading...if I could afford it, I'd be doing it myself. You can buy kits for specific calibers, and once you've dialed in the correct settings, you can pretty much just chug away making rounds indefinitely, unless you start experimenting with loads. If you shoot competitively, and do it often, you would very soon make up the initial costs from not having to buy commercial ammo anymore. If you shoot something goofy, like .38 Super, you'll recoup your initial costs quickly. If you're a hunter or shoot some sort of centerfire rifle competition, you can reload ammo specifically for your rifle chamber, increasing the accuracy and consistency of your shooting.

Having said all that, to me, the only downside of reloading is the initial costs. Once the equipment has paid for itself, it's all gravy from then on.

Not quite sure how'd you'd be able to do a reloading class in a classroom-type setting. Bunch of single-stage presses? Turrets and progressives would get expensive quick.

-JT
 

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I reload and it's a hobby within a hobby. Classes would be great for a begginer. I wish there was some around here when I started. I started with a manual and help from a friend on line who goes by 2400. I got about 5yrs under my belt now and I have learned a lot. My ammo cost is from 40% to 60% less than what it's costing you if you shoot store bought. Remember when my supplies go up so does your box of cartridges. Good shooting. :drinks
 

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I've thought about reloading a time or two. However I don't know much about it. From what little I have found (I haven't looked real hard) it seems that even at today's ammo prices I'm not sure it would be worth it for me.

That said, I would be interested in a reloading class to learn how it's done and to help me determine whether or not it would be a worthwhile endeavor.

Brian
 

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I reload and it's a hobby within a hobby. Classes would be great for a begginer. I wish there was some around here when I started. I started with a manual and help from a friend on line who goes by 2400. I got about 5yrs under my belt now and I have learned a lot. My ammo cost is from 40% to 60% less than what it's costing you if you shoot store bought. Remember when my supplies go up so does your box of cartridges. Good shooting. :drinks
What are the start up costs?
 

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What are the start up costs?
When folks ask me that I tell them about the price of a good pistol. Buy quality the first time and it will last a life time. Depending on how much you shoot will be a big factor in what you buy. How quick it pays for it's self will depend again on how much you shoot. Nobody I know stays with just one caliber and they add more as they go. For beginners I recommend the Modern Reloading 2nd Edition by Richard Lee. Cost is only about $12.00 and there's a lot of good info in it. Then the Speer's Reloading Manual. Read up in it and go buy your stuff and good reloading. I'll help you all I can but I know Dillon products the best because that is what I have used for years. :drinks
 

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I have been considering completing the Certified Reloaders Instructors course through the NRA and putting on Reloading classes.

I see a lot of people on a buncha forums saying how they would "like" to get into reloading...but I think some folks are intimidated by the idea of going it alone.

What would you guys' opinion be of something like that?
One more Cert cant hurt ya Frank. I think its good idea. I'll sign up. When's the 1st class:)
 

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I'd love to do it too. I have started collecting some of the equipment already. I have dies, rifle brass, a powder trickler, and several reloading manuals. I just have to break down by the press, scale, etc. I've been eyeing a RCBS Rockchucker Kit for the longest. Just haven't "pulled the trigger yet." :dancingbanana
 

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I am one of those trying to get into reloading and it would be nice to have someone show me the ropes the first time. It would definately make me feel better about what I am doing knowing that there is someone experianced showing me how it is done, rather than me trying it after reading some books and surfing "how to's" on the web...
 

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Its an old thread, but how did this end? Is there such a thing now, or did you let it go?

I would love to actually learn how to do reloads, in a practiacal setting.
 

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I would love to take a beginners reloading class. That way I can try it out and not spend a lot of money on equipment until I know that I even want to do it. Let me know when and where the first class is!
 

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I'd be interested in classes. One of the reasons I haven't started is that I don't want to ruin my gun because I screw something up. I know I could just study on my own but then I think that if someone was to actually show me how I'd learn faster and better (just my learning style).

Does anyone know of a good DVD that teaches reloading?

One of the other reasons is the initial start up costs. I'd like to try my hands at reloading without having to buy everything. If someone was teaching a class with some hands-on time practicing on equipment I didn't have to buy would be great.
 

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I started the beginning of this year loading .38spl. I did it on the cheap. went with all lee equipment, single stage press, dippers instead of a scale etc. I think it cost me a little under $300 to load my first 300 rounds, but I recouped my investment at about 800 rnds. That's figuring at about $30/100. Afterwards it's about $12/100, and it's a lot of fun. You don't need a tumbler either. I just wipe them off with a clorox wipe when I'm inspecting the brass for splits and cracks. As far as having the room, all you need to do is mount the press to a board and clamp it down to a table or counter if you don't have a workbench. Try it, loading them is almost as much fun as shooting them, and it's better ammunition to boot. You can taylor the loads to your gun and needs. It's a win/win. :)
 

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Glad you're enjoying it. I've loaded tens of thousands of .38 SP. I don't even bother to wipe off the cases. Just check them for splits.
 
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