Florida Concealed Carry banner

1 - 17 of 17 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
44 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
hey guys I am reloading 9mm on a hornady lock n load AP and I am using hornady new dimension carbide dies. The problem I have is when run a case up into the resizing die it seem awful stiff. I am not sure if this is normal or not, when the cases back out the top 25-30% is scuffed up is this normal? thanks for any help.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
54 Posts
I've never used the Hornady reloading dies. You mentioned they are carbide dies so I don't think they'd require lubricating.

If the dies are new, maybe there is a burr somewhere in the die mouth.

On my dies (which are Lee) there is an occasional light "scuff" on some cartridges but it is minimal.

Maybe try posting some pictures so we can compare.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,068 Posts
9mm shouldn't feel stiff. Its a pretty easy caliber to reload. ummm, is your decapping pin too deep? what kind of brass? Are you sure its brass and not a coated metal? These are good dies and a good machine......got one...
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
10,691 Posts
9 mm uses a tapered case, so even with a carbide sizing die I like to use a little lube.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
44 Posts
Discussion Starter #5
I installed the dies according to the instructions which basically say screw down until it touches the top of the shell plate. I have backed it out and things are smoother but sometimes it does not decap a round and I am afraid its not resizing the case properly if the case does not go all the way into the die. What do you guys think?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
313 Posts
I always use lube,no matter what.I have a dillion now and before that a single stage which I reloaded 9 m/m on too.If your not decapping the old primer,then you are not going far enough up into the die to size and de-prime.I've only seen scruff marks if the case was going way too far up into the sizing die.If you do use lube every so often check and clean out any lube that may "harden" and stick in the dies.I've cleaned the old stuck lube by boiling the dies in water.Either way you'll be surprised how much easier the lube will make reloading.The lube is cheap and if you don't want to buy a lube pad too,I have used a man-made sponge instead and that works good.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
44 Posts
Discussion Starter #7
I used case lube but the case still comes out scrathed up.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,068 Posts
I used case lube but the case still comes out scrathed up.
Ive never used lube on my pistol rounds. This sounds like something else. I would call Hornady and chat with their tech dept. They are very helpful. You could have gotten a bad die or somehow set something up incorrectly. Hard to say when its not in front of us. Have the number of your shell plate and the original container from the die when you call them. Im sure they can help you.............:) And let us know who it goes...............
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
195 Posts
You mentioned they are carbide dies so I don't think they'd require lubricating.
Misconception! They require minimal lubrication. For tapered wall cases like the majority of rifle cartridges, very little lube is needed, but when re-sizing ANY straight-walled brass, be it 9mm or the long .45-70Govt, you need to lube. They make a spray product you can spray up into the die and it will remain lubed for a few hundred cases or so. Don't recall the product name, but I think MidwayUSA or Brownells sells it.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
877 Posts
I keep all my 9mm brass in a tuperware container. I just shake the container to get most of the cases to sit upright then hit it at an angle with a very light mist of OneShot so a little goes into the case and outside. Works great for pistol calibers, but I still prefer Imperial for rifle calibers.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
304 Posts
You can likely solve the "scuffed" problem yourself with a little effort.

If you have access to a dremel tool you can use one of the stiff felt bobbins and some of the red rouge polishing compound ran at high speed to polish those scratched areas out of that die. I have several older Lyman sizing dies that occasionally require that procedure I've used for over forty years....in fact just yesterday I polished the interior of my .38/357 set to smooth out a batch of .38 spl's as I have to re-qualify under LEOSA tomorrow and I was low on that stuff. Worked like a champ......I have noticed over the years that the nickled cases tend to really show 'drag' (vertical) scratching marks quite frequently. The polish job slicks that right up and has never changed dimension to any degree that I could measure...........I've also used that same method to slick up an old beat up carbide Lee sizer that left marks.....worked like a charm.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
54 Posts
Misconception! They require minimal lubrication. For tapered wall cases like the majority of rifle cartridges, very little lube is needed, but when re-sizing ANY straight-walled brass, be it 9mm or the long .45-70Govt, you need to lube. They make a spray product you can spray up into the die and it will remain lubed for a few hundred cases or so. Don't recall the product name, but I think MidwayUSA or Brownells sells it.
Jason, the engineers at Lee Reloading say that lubrication is not required when using their carbide dies for .40 and 9mm.

So, where did you get your engineering degree so I can try resolving the "experts" difference of opinion?

look here to see what the other experts (Lee Reloading) opinion is http://www.leeprecision.com/html/catalog/dies-pistol.html
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,414 Posts
sounds like dirty dies !

Try cleaning your dies with a bore swab ! You didnt say if you were cleaning your brass prior to reloading or not ,but sometimes a little grit gets inside the dies and can scratch your cases. I also like to use just a little lube even with carbide dies ! Try lubing about 1 case in twenty , see if that helps! Kevin
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,068 Posts
Jason, the engineers at Lee Reloading say that lubrication is not required when using their carbide dies for .40 and 9mm.

So, where did you get your engineering degree so I can try resolving the "experts" difference of opinion?

look here to see what the other experts (Lee Reloading) opinion is http://www.leeprecision.com/html/catalog/dies-pistol.html
woo easy does it Pilot.....take a breath........:rolf were gonna have a lube war.....Im not a lube guy either, havent used it on any pistol rounds in 20years. I was scratching my head a bit when i heard all the lube news....i'd like to know where the idea that you need to lube pistol rounds with carbide does came from, without the food fight....:D
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
54 Posts
woo easy does it Pilot.....take a breath........:rolf were gonna have a lube war.....Im not a lube guy either, havent used it on any pistol rounds in 20years. I was scratching my head a bit when i heard all the lube news....i'd like to know where the idea that you need to lube pistol rounds with carbide does came from, without the food fight....:D
LOL, no food fight without being able to eat the ammo:laughing

Lube/no Lube doesn't matter to me. Hmmm me thinks this thread may soon head into something kinky!

Anyway, I do tend to get rather "testy" when people try to present their "thoughts" as fact without question. Sorry :drinks
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
458 Posts
I've never used lube in my Carbide pistol dies and that's with over 3000 pistol rounds loaded. I save the lube for the rifle rounds or whatever comes to mind :D
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
135 Posts
I use 1 lubed to 8 dry on my .30 Carbine (tapered case) and lube free on .357 and .44. My dies are Lee and were visually dirty inside when I purchased them new. I disassembled and cleaned them inside & out and hit them with some case lube inside and a light oil outside. New dies are coated from the factory and have to be cleaned before using.
 
1 - 17 of 17 Posts
Top