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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
The intent of the posting, is to hear both sides . It is a learning experience for me . I do know bits and pieces of some advantages and disadvantages . However not too much from the actual shooters and those who choose to buy , carry and shoot them .

I'm trying to make up my mind about possibly purchasing a few of them . I have always had steel from an early age . I am also an avid collector and shooter of steel handguns . Yes i am very old school as i was raised with them . My family owned nothing but them . Opinions and input on the cost factors , comparing like models in higher semi / auto ones .

p.s. - I do know that some members on here have expressed a dislike , but why exactly . something about Glocks and having an unsupported case head when in battery , or ? I appreciate any input that i can receive , related to the above statements or questions . I'm sure participants will be candid .

Just added . With any polygonal barrel(s) can you shoot hard cast bullets with the lube rings ?

Reason being i have quite a few of them in many calibers & was just wondering , if this was possible.
 

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I have both steel, alloy, and polymer framed guns.

I have nothing bad to say about Glock quality or accuracy. I just don't like how they feel in my hand, so I will not own one.

On the other hand, I have a Steyr M40 and a Walther PPX that are both polymer frame, they are comfortable to hold, and they are great shooters.

The advantages of polymer are that they save some weight and are easier to carry, and there are fewer parts to rust. On the down side, they don't "feel" as solid as a metal framed gun if that is what you are used to.

I wouldn't dismiss a gun just because it has a polymer frame. Material science has come a long way from the early days of plastics.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
I have both steel, alloy, and polymer framed guns.

I have nothing bad to say about Glock quality or accuracy. I just don't like how they feel in my hand, so I will not own one.

On the other hand, I have a Steyr M40 and a Walther PPX that are both polymer frame, they are comfortable to hold, and they are great shooters.

The advantages of polymer are that they save some weight and are easier to carry, and there are fewer parts to rust. On the down side, they don't "feel" as solid as a metal framed gun if that is what you are used to.

I wouldn't dismiss a gun just because it has a polymer frame. Material science has come a long way from the early days of plastics.
Thank you much Mr. Afj .. This is exactly what i was looking for & appreciate your knowledge , in those things you mentioned . This will help me a lot (y)
 

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Steel and other alloys are very difficult to modify on the industrial level. Finding the Technical Data Package from WW2 production of the M1911A1 enabled any good factory to build 1911A1 clones. Polymer units can be cost effectively adapted to modified designs. Or, it's cheaper to make poly parts than metal. There are other advantages, including the frame not conducting heat, either from a hot hand on a cold day or heat from heavy shooting in a major competition under the beating sun on swampy desert shooting ranges. Geoff Whose last new metal frame pistol, was a Taurus PT-22 pocket pistol, my wife has the PLY-22.
 

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I grew up with steel. I learned mostly on a S&W 19 and 10. Then dad got a Colt .45 1911. That was a big gun for a little kid and I remember struggling as I constantly “limp wristed” it alot. That went away as I grew.

My first pistol ever was a Beretta 92FS. Still have it. My first carry pistol was a Colt .45 Officers Model, which was all steel.

In the mid 90’s I bought my first polymer gun, .40 cal Glock 23, gen 2. I was amazed at how well it shot and how fast I could shoot it. It also was at the time the “compromise” caliber between 9mm and .45. for greater power over the 9 and more rounds then the .45.

I’ve been a Glock fan ever since and have several. It is my go to night stand and home defense gun. About 6 months ago I purchased the Sig P365 because of it’s size, weight, and capacity. I was surprised at how well it shot and bought a second one. They are my EDC and bug now.

I have nothing bad to say about polymer. Advancement in modern technology should be taken advantage of in my opinion. Polymer guns are lighter and easier to carry for me. That said, I have plenty of steel full sized pistols and would never get rid of them.

Good luck on your search. Hope this helps. (y)
 

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Case in point, carried an all steel 1911, or two at times, for decades working the streets. Gov models, 38 ounces unloaded. Today I carry a shield 45 that's polymer framed, weighs 23 ounces and carries just one round less than a 1911. Shoots as soft as a 1911 all steel gov model. That seems like an advantage where weight is concerned and is fully reliable out of the box where back in the day I had to take the 1911's to my gunsmith for a reliability package before I'd trust my life with them.

Lighter guns [ polymer framed ] are faster to draw out of the holster than heavier guns. Takes less inertia to get it moving up and out. Not by a lot, but enough to make a difference when time is in severely short supply. May make no difference to most however, as ones draw speed may be slow enough to not even notice the difference.

Polymer frames usually don't have screwed down grip panels, and there's no worries about rust forming under a grip panel. Even my s/s 60-1 357 had developed rust under the grip panel that rests on my skin after several years. Yes, s/s is rust resistant, not rust proof. That's a plus in my book, no worries of grip panels coming loose, or ruse developing under a grip and needing judicious maintenance regularly.

Poly's and particularly striker fired poly's have proven themselves as or more reliable out of the box than many hammer fired steel/Lw aluminum framed guns. Of course there's always exceptions to the rule. One has to choose known reliable guns to begin with. I wouldn't compare a Taurus poly to a well made 1911 or P35 steel hammer fired pistol, that's like comparing a Yugo to a Mercedes [ so quality vs quality comparisons as it were ].

Poly's aren't as efficient at pistol whipping someone should the gun need to be used in that manner. Though I've not seen many cases of in the wild examples, I know I can't use it as a club in a worst case scenario if the gun malfs like I could my P35, P7's 1911's etc.

I'll carry both, have for decades and will continue to do so as the mood dictates.
 

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I don’t see any big difference function wise in polymer versus steel. Historically, different frame material started sneaking into the market as early as maybe 1960 when Remington developed a model 66 .22 rifle, it had a nylon stock and are worth a few bucks these days and are still functional.

Next, way before Glock and about 10 years after the Remington, H&K came out with the “Volkspistol”(The people’s pistol).It was the VP 70 and was available in a military model with a different rate of fire and a civilian model. They were ugly as can be, I never liked shooting them and they even had some weird stock that you could attach. Glock came along more than 10 years later with their version of the polymer pistol.

Lighter weight usually means greater recoil. Polymer, however it said to mitigate the recoil a little bit because it kind of flexes with the flow. Advancements in pistol design seems to be at the pinnacle these days. I remember when my police department went from wheel guns to the Smith and Wesson model 59. I was totally intrigued and every stove pipe made me want my wheel gun back. Pre-covid I could see someone going into a well-equipped gun store and coming out needing psychological counseling from the inability to make a decision.
 

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Poly's aren't as efficient at pistol whipping someone should the gun need to be used in that manner.
I have steel, alloy, and poly and have no strong opinion either way (except maybe for brownie's point above, in which case I'm already empty, too close, or both lol). I don't deliberately choose one type over the other other than by the overall feel, fit to hand, weight and balance. My CZ feels like it was designed around my hand but my poly Ruger is about 1/3 lighter. My Beretta feels the heaviest and isn't a perfect fit, but is the easiest and most accurate for me to shoot left handed. I was always under the impression that the bias against Glock was because of the lack of external/manual safety (especially for those coming from manual and grip safeties).
 

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I don’t see any big difference function wise in polymer versus steel. Historically, different frame material started sneaking into the market as early as maybe 1960 when Remington developed a model 66 .22 rifle, it had a nylon stock and are worth a few bucks these days and are still functional.

Next, way before Glock and about 10 years after the Remington, H&K came out with the “Volkspistol”(The people’s pistol).It was the VP 70 and was available in a military model with a different rate of fire and a civilian model. They were ugly as can be, I never liked shooting them and they even had some weird stock that you could attach. Glock came along more than 10 years later with their version of the polymer pistol.

Lighter weight usually means greater recoil. Polymer, however it said to mitigate the recoil a little bit because it kind of flexes with the flow. Advancements in pistol design seems to be at the pinnacle these days. I remember when my police department went from wheel guns to the Smith and Wesson model 59. I was totally intrigued and every stove pipe made me want my wheel gun back. Pre-covid I could see someone going into a well-equipped gun store and coming out needing psychological counseling from the inability to make a decision.
I give customers a test while they close their eyes, hand out waiting for me to put different guns in their outstretched hand. On a scale of 1-10, 10 being best, 1 being totally don't like the feel, I'll hand them several models.

Then they may open their eyes and see which ones scored higher for "feel" in their hand. The gun that feels better in their hand is the one they'll usually shoot better naturally.
 

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I love a steel pistol, but I don’t like carrying one for its weight. My personal preference is a lighter CCP on my waistline. YMMV


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

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I give customers a test while they close their eyes, hand out waiting for me to put different guns in their outstretched hand. On a scale of 1-10, 10 being best, 1 being totally don't like the feel, I'll hand them several models.

Then they may open their eyes and see which ones scored higher for "feel" in their hand. The gun that feels better in their hand is the one they'll usually shoot better naturally.
I stole that from you years ago to use when helping students and friends choose a new firearm. Works beautifully every time! (y)
 

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Discussion Starter #12
I love a steel pistol, but I don’t like carrying one for its weight. My personal preference is a lighter CCP on my waistline. YMMV


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HI there Mr. Caleb ..What does the above [ YMMV ] stand for ? Duh lol :unsure:
 

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AFJuvat said:
I have both steel, alloy, and polymer framed guns.

I have nothing bad to say about Glock quality or accuracy. I just don't like how they feel in my hand, so I will not own one.

>>>Exactly how I felt about a Glock until I held a 43x. No Glock bump and for me the perfect EDC size in my hand.
 

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i always get a charge out of the statement "poly guns dont feel as solid"...when they have proven themselves time and time again to be reliable and in most cases trouble free and less likely to require "tuning"...

my personal opinion(s)...a 1911 looks like a handgun should look (appearance) and is a wonderful gun to shoot...polymer is the evolution of handguns and many succumb to the human condition, which is resistance to change (but they love their heated seats in their escalade)...polymer pistols have beat the weight/recoil problem in many cases with a lower bore axis...

a gun that holds more rounds, is lighter to carry, faster on the draw, less necessary maintenance & care, overall better reliability (both short and long term) and has great combat accuracy should be everybody's go to firearm...but to each their own...
 

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I owned 4 before my boating accident Glock 21SF, and a 36 both 45ACP's very light, trigger about 5LB's and a bit spongy . Two S&W M&P's a 9C is the compact got it in a trade I really liked it for doctor and dentist apointments. So I ran into a black Friday sale for a full size M&P 2.0 9mm two years ago for 299$ ,the trigger was so bad that I bought an Apex Match trigger and fiberoptic sights for it, now it's a great gun holds 17+1 rounds very light, fits your hand like a glove a great carry gun, I hope the fish are happy with it.
 

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Discussion Starter #18
I owned 4 before my boating accident Glock 21SF, and a 36 both 45ACP's very light, trigger about 5LB's and a bit spongy . Two S&W M&P's a 9C is the compact got it in a trade I really liked it for doctor and dentist apointments. So I ran into a black Friday sale for a full size M&P 2.0 9mm two years ago for 299$ ,the trigger was so bad that I bought an Apex Match trigger and fiberoptic sights for it, now it's a great gun holds 17+1 rounds very light, fits your hand like a glove a great carry gun, I hope the fish are happy with it.
Great post /reply & it's appreciated . Sorry to hear about your boating accident. So is what you are saying , your gun went down in the accident ? . You sure sound like a very knowledgeable gun owner and gunsmith to boot ..

I only changed out my Saiga variant .308 trigger with an updated one .. I didn't like the hollow Ak style & first tried to fill it with solder . Well when the torch was on it , it just blew in pieces .. That precipitated the new trigger which is much better . I changed the entire look of it to a military style . I limit my gunsmithing , lol
 

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I stole that from you years ago to use when helping students and friends choose a new firearm. Works beautifully every time! (y)
Glad to see it's being paid forward BH. I make some good sales off this at the shop, so much so the boss now does the same on the days I'm not working.
 

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Glad to see it's being paid forward BH. I make some good sales off this at the shop, so much so the boss now does the same on the days I'm not working.
Brownie....
If you just had two categories:
Women and Men
What pistols do you think are the three that feel best using your method? Three for women, three for men.
 
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