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How about a 9x18 Makarov? Same size projectile as a 9mm but a bit shorter with less powder (less recoil). A CZ 82 comes to mind.

Or the S&W M&P 380 EZ.


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If you decide on a revolver,
Please make sure it has a hammer on it to use single action, The ones with the no hammer sticking out are really hard to shoot for a lot of old people.
I would probably get him an S&W EZ 380 or EZ 9mm and a Magula EZ loader for the magazines.
The 380 has less recoil and using Federal HST ammo is a good choice.
Ronnie
 

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Discussion Starter #24
How about a 9x18 Makarov? Same size projectile as a 9mm but a bit shorter with less powder (less recoil). A CZ 82 comes to mind.

Or the S&W M&P 380 EZ.


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Good idea. I can have him try my CZ 82 for ability to function. 9mm Kurz (.380).
 

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Good idea. I can have him try my CZ 82 for ability to function. 9mm Kurz (.380).
You have the 83 then, .380 but, same gun.


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My FiL is 84 and, considering the current climate, is concerned about protection for his wife and himself. When he asked me about what gun to consider, I found myself weighing a lot of factors as I formulated my response. I have no issue with determining what he can handle and demanding he get training. Those factors are a non-starter.

My concern is his health in considering training, practice, and ensuring realistic expectations. As many men who have worked all their lives he is used to being a proud, confident, and capable person. He currently takes blood thinners and that is my primary worry. He will bleed out brushing up against a hedge. Two weeks ago as result of some light gardening, Peter had to be rushed to the hospital when a misstep ripped through his leg. the damage caught me by surprise as his skin shredded like thin paper after simply stepping through two hedges. The worry is not the his willingness to defend himself, he would not hesitate to protect his wife. I think my worry is going to the range for an form of practice. I'm afraid that a piece of ejected brass would turn into a medical scare.

Of those here that do a lot of training, what has been your experience working with very fragile folks? Are there recommended practices when the practice environment has an increased lethality for folks willing to develop self defense skills?

Is this even a path to consider when someone is that frail?
The S&W EZ in 380 might work. I’m 77, don’t have great hand strength but the slide is EZ, the trigger pull is EZ and with the 380 there’s not much recoil. I also have a first aid kit with QuickClot bandages in my range bag. I’m proud of your dad for taking on this new adventure at his age!
 

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The 9mm would be better, try that first the neighbor next door got one for his wife who has medical problems.
 

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It is never too late. But given his history it makes sense. Being formerly British his thinking towards guns is different than the American independent spirit. Now, as a proud American citizen, he sees the world under an American lens. That is quite an accomplishment for a person of his age, this shift in core thinking. I give him a lot of credit for moving from his roots and adopting this the US view of life.
If he buys a gun, I want to make sure he does not injure himself and that he becomes as capable as he possibly can in the endeavor.While I can only offer my opinion, when asked,he makes his own decisions and actions. I will not try to convince him otherwise, unless it is a severe action. If, because of his condition, it is not advisable to have a gun in his home, then I would state such advice. Hence my question here from, not only, the more experienced trainers, but also from those that have elderly parents and have gone through a similar experience.

I've got a S&W .38 that he could try and confirm his ability to operate. So I guess I could confirm that he can hit a target. At least as a first step.
I really appreciate these factors to consider.
I'm thinking a .38 unless it's fairly heavy and has a longer barrel, might be a bit much for his hands and grip. Have you thought of something along the lines of a SW .380 shield EZ or Beretta 84F? Betetta is DA/Sa and hard to rack but if it's already chambered...by you, all he has to do is pull the DA trigger. Recoil on SW shield and 84 is mild. DA/Sa is good (IMHO) because there is no safety lever that he has to remember to flick off. Shield has safety. Another option is the new springfield series with palm safety. I think it's the XD series. LCR .22 lr could work as well but trigger is a bit stiff.
 

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I’ve got a 357 wheel gun, 2 inch barrel I can recommend.

Of course I’m joking, hanging on to that thing will put hair on your knuckles. :LOL:

I‘ll echo what others have said. My dad is in the same boat. He couldn’t operate the slide on his 9mm or load magazines anymore. Gave it to me and bought a .38 revolver, 4 inch barrel. Easy to shoot, load and unload for him and is concealable....enough.

I know folks eschew.380, but he can also easily shoot my Bersa Thunder. My issue with that thing is I hate pocket carry and its small size, for me anyway, makes belt holster carry seem weird.

Again echoing other comments, bravo to him for seeing things with an open mind and the two of you for working it out. (y)
 

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Calico M900 9mm Carbine?
 

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Ruger PC Charger
 

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Discussion Starter #36
We're visiting him today and I'm going to have him try out a couple of pistols I have to get a gauge of strength.
Also, going to research items like QuikClot for people taking blood thinners.
 

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My FiL is 84 and, considering the current climate, is concerned about protection for his wife and himself. When he asked me about what gun to consider, I found myself weighing a lot of factors as I formulated my response. I have no issue with determining what he can handle and demanding he get training. Those factors are a non-starter.

My concern is his health in considering training, practice, and ensuring realistic expectations. As many men who have worked all their lives he is used to being a proud, confident, and capable person. He currently takes blood thinners and that is my primary worry. He will bleed out brushing up against a hedge. Two weeks ago as result of some light gardening, Peter had to be rushed to the hospital when a misstep ripped through his leg. the damage caught me by surprise as his skin shredded like thin paper after simply stepping through two hedges. The worry is not the his willingness to defend himself, he would not hesitate to protect his wife. I think my worry is going to the range for an form of practice. I'm afraid that a piece of ejected brass would turn into a medical scare.

Of those here that do a lot of training, what has been your experience working with very fragile folks? Are there recommended practices when the practice environment has an increased lethality for folks willing to develop self defense skills?

Is this even a path to consider when someone is that frail?
 

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If you meant to add to the conversation, dbragg4, it didn't come through. 🤔
 

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Prior to deciding which gun is most appropriate for him, you may want to ask him how often his INR is being monitored and by whom. While blood thinners can lead to increased bruising and bleeding, it sounds like his INR may not be within therapeutic level. An elevated INR can cause dizziness or weakness which could contribute to your FIL having a less than successful experience regardless of his choice of weapon. Best wishes and congratulations to him for his proactive approach to keeping his family safe.😊
 

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Discussion Starter #40
We're visiting him today and I'm going to have him try out a couple of pistols I have to get a gauge of strength.
Also, going to research items like QuikClot for peopleon blood thinners
Prior to deciding which gun is most appropriate for him, you may want to ask him how often his INR is being monitored and by whom. While blood thinners can lead to increased bruising and bleeding, it sounds like his INR may not be within therapeutic level. An elevated INR can cause dizziness or weakness which could contribute to your FIL having a less than successful experience regardless of his choice of weapon. Best wishes and congratulations to him for his proactive approach to keeping his family safe.😊
They're getting that dialed in after his hip replacement. He is competent enough to make his determination. I'm just laying out options in case he decides to proceed.
 
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