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Beautiful and nice chootin'! (y)(y)
Uhm, I only see one hole on that target. I think there is something wrong with that pistol, I’ll
Take it off your hands for you.





Seriously, beautiful hardware and excellent shooting.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

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That’s great!

Baers often have to be taken down a bit differently:

After ensuring that the pistol is unloaded and the mag removed; cock the hammer, then move the slide to the rear enough to line up the “notch” so that the slide stop can be removed. I do that by holding the pistol in my left hand with my left thumb through the trigger guard, and my other four fingers grasping the slide across the top. I use my right hand to grasp the grip, and push it to line up the take down notch, then use my left hand to hold things in place, so I can use my right hand to remove the slide stop.

I then move the slide forward using that same left hand grasp, but with my left thumb out of the trigger guard. I then use that thumb to hold the recoil spring and guide rod in place as the slide moves forward off of the frame.

Remove the recoil spring and guide rod, and recoil spring plug from the rear, then push the barrel forward a half inch or so until the barrel and barrel bushing are no longer mated tightly together.

You can then use a bushing wrench to turn the bushing to where the lug on the bushing is lined up properly for removal.

Then, grasp the barrel with one hand, hold the slide in the other, and pull the barrel sharply forward; using it as a “battering ram” to drive the bushing forward, out of the slide.

Ever since I figured out this method for taking down a Baer, I’ve used it to take down all my 1911s, as it’s faster that way. Of course, the “battering ram” bushing removal isn’t necessary. However; the step of moving the barrel forward out of battery with the bushing prior to turning the bushing is a very good practice to follow with all 1911s. It helps to minimize wear of the bushing/barrel lockup surfaces.
 

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Discussion Starter #43
I would never thought of that, do you have a cure for the bi-focal curse? I was hoping that after a few more range trips it would loosen up some.
 

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I would never thought of that, do you have a cure for the bi-focal curse? I was hoping that after a few more range trips it would loosen up some.
Well, mine‘s 11 now, and it’s still “that” tight. Can’t help with the bifocal problem, I have that myself.

You don’t need to field strip it now anyway. Just lock the slide to the rear, and run some oil down the frame/slide rails every hundred rounds or so, until you either reach 500 rounds, or you think it needs cleaning.
 

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Discussion Starter #45
That was the plan to run 500 through it before field stripping , but if yours is still that tight after 11 years I better print out the instructions because that will be the new norm. I'll still do a regular clean after the range trips.
 

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That was the plan to run 500 through it before field stripping , but if yours is still that tight after 11 years I better print out the instructions because that will be the new norm. I'll still do a regular clean after the range trips.
Good idea, as your Bear will still be tight when your great grand kids are shooting it, many years down the road. (y)
 

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Discussion Starter #47
Thank you for the information, I don't think that is in any manual I have ever read.
 
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