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Funny you say that. when I was a senior in high school (1980), my mom and stepfather were living in Iraq. They often shopped in neighboring Kuwait (nicer stores). That year, for Christmas, they bought my brother and me the latest Seiko digital watch that had a calculator built in! This was CUTTING EDGE SH*T at the time! Those watches were $300... in 1980 dollars. Expensive. This is the watch:

View attachment 68684

I think the esthetics still hold up today. In fact, I think it looks better than today's calculator watches.

My brother and I returned to school (in small-town Arkansas) after the Christmas break, thinking we were the "sh*t!" LOL! And, the watches DID get a lot of attention, since nobody had ever seen anything like them.

I went to look for mine just the other night and couldn't find it. I swear I still have it somewhere! I gotta find it. NIB examples sell for $800+ today. Trashed examples sell for $200+.
Nowadays, you can just get an Alexa ring, and it will do square roots.
Plus, read your email, book appointments, do some shopping, read your Kindle books, etc....

Who needs a watch? :)
 

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Discussion Starter #182
Nowadays, you can just get an Alexa ring, and it will do square roots.
Plus, read your email, book appointments, do some shopping, read your Kindle books, etc....

Who needs a watch? :)
Haha... you be trollin'? ;)

I didn't know there was an Alexa RING? Wow. How does it work? Just curious. Never heard of it. I've heard of the home base units, of course... and car versions.

But, yeah... way in hell I'd install a bug in my house or on my body. :p
 
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Discussion Starter #184
"Tools."

68697
 
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What’s in the holster? Pics of it? 🤓
 

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Nice! (y)

I have a 640 from many years ago.

45956FC3-D56C-4758-9655-056FB0F90D07.jpeg


How do you like that Remora holster for it? Worth recommending?
 

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Discussion Starter #188
Nice! (y)

How do you like that Remora holster for it? Worth recommending?
I use the Remora as a pocket holster. Works very well.
 

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Is yours an Airweight? Mine is all steel .357/.38. I found it heavy in my pocket which is why I have yet to buy a pocket holster. Used to primarily carry it in a Galco ankle holster as a BUG years ago.
 

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Discussion Starter #190
Is yours an Airweight? Mine is all steel .357/.38. I found it heavy in my pocket which is why I have yet to buy a pocket holster. Used to primarily carry it in a Galco ankle holster as a BUG years ago.
Yes. 642 Airweight.
 

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Very nice “tools” Racer.


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Discussion Starter #193
My "insta-collection!" (yeah... the lower right one is upside down... whoops)

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Just in case you don't have enough things to obsess over and be anal retentive about, let me introduce you to a website called Time.is - exact time, any time zone. It serves a similar purpose as the http://nist.time.gov website, but I suggested to the author of time.is that he add the ability to do tenths of a second on his site for those of us that are freaks about precise watch synchronization.

To enable tenths on time.is:
  1. Click the hamburger icon (3 horizontal lines) in the upper right corner
  2. Choose Customize
  3. Click the checkbox for "Turn seconds, tenths and milliseconds on/off by clicking the right side of the clock"
  4. Click "Back to the Front Page"
  5. Click in a blank space to the right of the time display to switch between whole seconds, tenths, and thousandths.
When time.is first loads it's going to stutter a bit as the ads load. On my Android phone I have an ad blocker that prevents this, but on my PC even AdBlock doesn't prevent the initial stutter. It stabilizes after about 15 seconds.

Most of your watches appear to be quartz so they should hold to around 15 seconds a month if they aren't radio-sync. If they are radio-sync and you get a good sync each night then they'll probably never be off by more than a half a second.

Most of my watches are mechanical which means I check the sync each day when I pick which watch I'm going to wear. If it's a Spring Drive it'll gain around 18 hundredths of a second a day. If it's a lower end mechanical it'll probably gain around 5 to 10 seconds in a day. Higher end mechanicals tend to be around 1 or 2 seconds a day.

I also have a couple "HAQ" (High Accuracy Quartz) watches that only gain about 5 seconds a year, about 1.4 hundredths of a second per day, with no external syncing. That's a pretty incredible feat of engineering in my book - worthy of wearing even though it's quartz (I generally eschew quartz, with limited exceptions).

I'm such a time-nerd that I even have a live-data GPS clock on top of my dresser with the watch box, which displays tenths of a second and should never deviate from atomic clock time by more than one ten-thousandth of a second. In reality you might not even say it's a clock because it doesn't actually keep the time - it displays the time live from the GPS signals in real time. So if it loses GPS lock it won't display the time. If it's showing the time, it's definitely correct. This is different than the radio sync clocks which only usually sync the time once in the early morning hours and then use their own internal timekeeping for the next 24 hours until the next sync. Radio sync clocks with typical quartz timekeeping will gain or lose around a half a second during the course of the 24 hours that elapse between syncs.

Now a half second may not seem like much, but if you're a time lord and checking the accuracy of a very expensive timepiece that is supposed to be very accurate, your clock being off by a half second could lead you to believe that there is something REALLY wrong with your watch when there isn't. Yeah, some of us are that nuts about this stuff. But you might have deduced that obsessiveness when I said my Spring Drive gains "about 18 hundredths of a second a day". In fact the actual measurement was 0.187 seconds per day - and if you had a half-second error in your reference time source it would really screw up your testing unless you were testing over a long enough period to make that half-second irrelevant.

I have compared the time.is time against live GPS time and find that it is very consistent. I frequently use time.is for doing a quick rough sync of a timepiece, when I don't need it to be flawlessly synchronized (i.e. I'm not doing a timing analysis of the piece).
 
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Just in case you don't have enough things to obsess over and be anal retentive about, let me introduce you to a website called Time.is - exact time, any time zone. It serves a similar purpose as the http://nist.time.gov website, but I suggested to the author of time.is that he add the ability to do tenths of a second on his site for those of us that are freaks about precise watch synchronization.

To enable tenths on time.is:
  1. Click the hamburger icon (3 horizontal lines) in the upper right corner
  2. Choose Customize
  3. Click the checkbox for "Turn seconds, tenths and milliseconds on/off by clicking the right side of the clock"
  4. Click "Back to the Front Page"
  5. Click in a blank space to the right of the time display to switch between whole seconds, tenths, and thousandths.
When time.is first loads it's going to stutter a bit as the ads load. On my Android phone I have an ad blocker that prevents this, but on my PC even AdBlock doesn't prevent the initial stutter. It stabilizes after about 15 seconds.

Most of your watches appear to be quartz so they should hold to around 15 seconds a month if they aren't radio-sync. If they are radio-sync and you get a good sync each night then they'll probably never be off by more than a half a second.

Most of my watches are mechanical which means I check the sync each day when I pick which watch I'm going to wear. If it's a Spring Drive it'll gain around 18 hundredths of a second a day. If it's a lower end mechanical it'll probably gain around 5 to 10 seconds in a day. Higher end mechanicals tend to be around 1 or 2 seconds a day.

I also have a couple "HAQ" (High Accuracy Quartz) watches that only gain about 5 seconds a year, about 1.4 hundredths of a second per day, with no external syncing. That's a pretty incredible feat of engineering in my book - worthy of wearing even though it's quartz (I generally eschew quartz, with limited exceptions).

I'm such a time-nerd that I even have a live-data GPS clock on top of my dresser with the watch box, which displays tenths of a second and should never deviate from atomic clock time by more than one ten-thousandth of a second. In reality you might not even say it's a clock because it doesn't actually keep the time - it displays the time live from the GPS signals in real time. So if it loses GPS lock it won't display the time. If it's showing the time, it's definitely correct. This is different than the radio sync clocks which only usually sync the time once in the early morning hours and then use their own internal timekeeping for the next 24 hours until the next sync. Radio sync clocks with typical quartz timekeeping will gain or lose around a half a second during the course of the 24 hours that elapse between syncs.

Now a half second may not seem like much, but if you're a time lord and checking the accuracy of a very expensive timepiece that is supposed to be very accurate, your clock being off by a half second could lead you to believe that there is something REALLY wrong with your watch when there isn't. Yeah, some of us are that nuts about this stuff. But you might have deduced that obsessiveness when I said my Spring Drive gains "about 18 hundredths of a second a day". In fact the actual measurement was 0.187 seconds per day - and if you had a half-second error in your reference time source it would really screw up your testing unless you were testing over a long enough period to make that half-second irrelevant.

I have compared the time.is time against live GPS time and find that it is very consistent. I frequently use time.is for doing a quick rough sync of a timepiece, when I don't need it to be flawlessly synchronized (i.e. I'm not doing a timing analysis of the piece).
OK, you win dude! :LOL: (y)
 

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Agreed. My head hurts reading that.
 

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Discussion Starter #199
The one on the lower-left seems to be running a little fast. :p
It's kind of wild to look at all the "atomic" watches with the same time to the second.
 
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