Florida Concealed Carry banner
1 - 20 of 24 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
974 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
As a newbie to handguns I am curious what everybody did to get better in the different aspects of CCW.

Did you read books? Did you hit websites? Did you pay for classes? Did you find coaches? Did you go to the range and watch others?

This can be concealment techniques, the way you draw, trigger control, how you hold your weapon, cleaning or just about anything else you may have learned.

Thanks in advance.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
115 Posts
As a newbie myself I suspect that the way to improve is to do all of the above. I suspect that you also never stop learning. I hope to hear from you more experienced guys.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
297 Posts
All of the above would be ideal...but I have been carrying for 15 years...and have generally been too broke to afford much "professional" training...as much as I would have liked it.

Read, read, read...practice what you read and develop muscle memory and positive carry habits...

Lately...I have been considering buying one of those realistic airsoft guns myself and going out into the yard and practicing various carry techniques as well as playing out tactical scenarios.

Also...research has also proven that visualization of what you successfully want to accomplish is a very effective training method for just about anything...so close your eyes...and let your mind lead you through various scenarios and what you would do in response.

If you can afford additional training...certainly obtain as much as you can get. :)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
115 Posts
For me I checked out the reference materials others recommend in the different forums. I also am a practical thinker. After I got over the initial feeling of invincibility that owning my first gun brought I started reading as much real life self defense shootings and realized that whatever I did to train must take into account the realities of the real world. I too agree that you never stop learning.
 

·
Administrator
Joined
·
3,949 Posts
These are the three things that worked for me and I found these things through reading hundreds of posts and youtube videos.

1) Practice carrying at home all the times. You'll fund whats best for you.
2) Practice drawing and dry firing at home or live fire at the range if they will allow it.
3 Do less target shooting and more rapid fire drills (3 shots) from the retention position at the range.

I still would like to go to a shooting school to perfect or correct my skills though.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,083 Posts
I'm fortunate in that my martial arts instructor is an IDPA classified Master shooter (SSP division). Got plenty of tips and drills from him.

-JT
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
5,538 Posts
1)hey guys my cousin attended this course says it ws great he recommended me to take it as well im also looking into it.
2)Also this new place is opening up in St Augustine nice layout.Opens in july.

1)http://www.defensivetraininggroup.com/Defensive handgun page.htm


2)http://www.attac-fl.com



Gonna look into them


Personally i've learned by all of the above defence classes are in my future as well.
Friend of mine once said your mind is like a Parachute,It has to be open for it to work,if not you gonna crash and burn.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
297 Posts
I have a training certificate for Front Site (don't we all...? ;) )...now if I could afford the trip to Vegas and the expenses I would be good to go...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,581 Posts
Auction Arms has some kind of special going with front site for its members (free to sign up). The deal is supposed to be a free Springfield XD.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
45 Posts
Although my initial training was provided by the military, I've found that there is a lot that can be done on your own time to improve.

I know you know this, but the most important thing to learn is gun safety. How to check, clear and handle (point) a weapon. I see new people at the range every now and then and have lost count of the times I've been swept or observed other unsafe practices. Scary stuff. It can be uncomfortable, but you have to approach them about the behavior and help them. I believe that every gun owner should know gun safety well enough to teach it - regardless of their shooting ability.

I started by reading a LOT about proper shooting technique and made a list of things to try every time I went to the range (about once per week early on).

It worked best for me to start slow and create a repeatable routine. Basically a mental checklist of steps that result in your best and safest shooting. For example only (you'll find your own process) - grip, magazine, slide, sight picture, finger tip to trigger, breath, squeeze, repeat. This is actually very similar to golf or bowling. Find what works best for you to accomplish comfort and accuracy without regard to speed. Start slow and be very intentional about your actions. Once the basics become second nature, speed will come naturally.

From there, move on to more advanced techniques such as rapid fire and drawing. The latter can be practiced easily at home with a cleared weapon.

Professional training though is the best route IMO. Ask your local range if they offer lessons - there might even be an expert behind the counter willing to give you a session. When in doubt, ask. I've found that people (like the people on this board and at your range) are very friendly, knowledgeable and eager to help.

Sorry for the long post, but I hope that this is helpful.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
10,558 Posts
As a newbie to handguns I am curious what everybody did to get better in the different aspects of CCW.

Did you read books? Did you hit websites? Did you pay for classes? Did you find coaches? Did you go to the range and watch others?

This can be concealment techniques, the way you draw, trigger control, how you hold your weapon, cleaning or just about anything else you may have learned.

Thanks in advance.
I have been shooting since my dad taught me how back in the 60's ( I don't want to hear any old fart jokes either! :D ), then I was in the military, then I became a LEO. So I have had plenty of practice.

So what is my suggestion to get better?

Practice, Practice, Practice.

Talk to guys at your range or at gunshows who have been shooting and carrying concealed for a long time. Ask them questions, if they are not : censoredholes, they should be happy to talk and help.

Just remember, when talking about firearms, there are no dumb questions. BUT, just don't call a magazine a clip, that will get you a look from an experienced shooter!:D

:thumsup
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,224 Posts
I'm one of those guys that believes in learning and training with the Pro's when dollars allow it. Bad habits are easily learned and practiced and are hard to break. Proper training by any number of professionals will give you the best advantage of staying alive should the SHTF. Yes, practice and repetition at home, dry firing and range time helps like I said in a previous post but if at all possible pay for the training you won't regret it. Even the trainers train with other professionals. You never stop learning. As mentioned in another thread we will attending the course in Threat Focused Quick Kill Pistol Training by Robin Brown in Starke come Oct, but there's also additional training by some MT trainers like Randy Cain of Cumberland Tactics being offered at Southern Exposure in Lakeland a couple times a year. Regardless of who you pick to train with I highly recommend anyone who carries a firearm for self defense to pay for professional training regardless of the discipline.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
974 Posts
Discussion Starter · #14 ·
I figure I will work a little but longer on my regular shooting and developing safe gun handling habits before I take a class.

Right now, I have to give 100% concentration to feel even somewhat comfortable with my weapon loaded. I want to get safe gun handling to be second nature before I get fancy.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,224 Posts
Cover
In any self-defense use of a firearm, avoiding getting shot is equally important as stopping the attacker. You should always practice moving to cover and shooting from cover when you practice with your firearm. You will react as you train and moving to cover during practice will lead to, in most cases, moving to cover when your handgun comes out in that self defense
situation. If you practice that way you will react that way. Perfect practice makes perfect. This is how everyone is training now. As we learn more and more about what happens in life and death situations, we are learning we react exactly as we have trained. Most Drills don’t take cover into consideration. Do make changes to the standards listed here and use cover or move to cover at the start of your draw.

Dry Fire Safety
Pick one room for dry fire practice and remove any ammunition from that room. Do not allow any ammunition to come into that room. You can use snap caps if you are concerned about damaging your firearm while dry firing. Contact the maker of your firearm if you are concerned about dry firing your handgun. Do not dry fire a rim fire firearm like a .22 or .17 without snap
caps. Dry firing those firearms without snap caps will damage to the firearm.
Practicing reloading along with your dry fire Drills must be done only with snap caps. You cannot allow any ammo into the room and those few dollars for snap caps are a lot cheaper than putting holes in something in your home or worse, negligently shooting someone. Never forget that you are 100% responsible for all rounds that come out of your firearm.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,083 Posts
Cover

Dry Fire Safety
Pick one room for dry fire practice and remove any ammunition from that room. Do not allow any ammunition to come into that room. You can use snap caps if you are concerned about damaging your firearm while dry firing. Contact the maker of your firearm if you are concerned about dry firing your handgun. Do not dry fire a rim fire firearm like a .22 or .17 without snap
caps. Dry firing those firearms without snap caps will damage to the firearm.
Practicing reloading along with your dry fire Drills must be done only with snap caps. You cannot allow any ammo into the room and those few dollars for snap caps are a lot cheaper than putting holes in something in your home or worse, negligently shooting someone. Never forget that you are 100% responsible for all rounds that come out of your firearm.
This cannot be emphasized enough. More accidental shootings occur because of "unloaded" handguns. FL just had a recent case of a guy killing his pregnant wife because he thought the gun he was cleaning was unloaded.

If I need the weight of ammo in the mag, or need to practice clearing drills, I use a set of dummy rounds somebody made for me. They're unprimed, LRN bullets. Snap caps would be arguably safer, but since I never have live non-jacketed bullets in home, I'm fairly safe. Even so, I still check to make sure those cartridges didn't mysteriously sprout primers and powder before I use them. You can never be too safe.

There is a school of thought that says there are two kinds of people who have negligent discharges: Those that have had them, and those that will. Do all that you can to ensure that when it's your time to pop one off on accident, nothing is hurt but your pride.

-JT
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
55,261 Posts
Did you read books? Did you hit websites? Did you pay for classes? Did you find coaches? Did you go to the range and watch others?

This can be concealment techniques, the way you draw, trigger control, how you hold your weapon, cleaning or just about anything else you may have learned.


I didn't read the books that were available then, or visit websites [ websites for this type of information in the early 1970's ? :rolleyes:], I've always trained in a small group or individually with instructors who were considered tier 1 among their peers in the discipline I endeavored to learn at that time.

Now that I've read some of the books in the areas I've actually trained in, I have to inform that the guidance and hands on training by pros saved time and money in the long run. The written word can be interpreted or rather mis-interprated all too often where you think you actually doing something correctly and it's just not. Without having the instant feedback and advantage of the instructors knowledge to get you where you need to be in that time and space, you are missing a major vital part of the learning process.

I read with interest that some who have posted here are fairly new to CCW and carrying a firearm with SD in mind [ thats a wise choice to carry and be able to defend yourself/control your environment with the tools you have chosen.

Unfortunately, no one became a black belt reading a book or watching a video, nor is one likely to get all the nuances of some skill set from the written word or a video. Are books and vids a valuable resource? Absolutely.

I'm going to offer this to the members here for the first time as an instructor. This link is to a handgun class I'll be putting on in Oct in your great state.
http://floridaconcealedcarry.com/Forum/showthread.php?t=234

Read past students reviews of the course here:
http://www.threatfocused.com/forums/forumdisplay.php?f=19

Make the effort and attend this class for two days. If you think that the skills I can give you in those two days wasn't worth the time and money invested, I'll not take a dime from you. I'm that confident I can bring your skills level up that much in your draw stroke, trigger control and hits while firing 3-4 rds per second on threat.

Newer shooters, experienced shooters alike will increase their skills and speed exponentially. I teach people how to stay alive with a handgun, and in the process they become better shooters and are faster shooters with combat accuracy.

You have nothing to lose [ and a lot to gain ] in a weekend filled with shooting your handgun/s.:thumsup

Stay safe, I hope to meet some of you in the future.

Brownie
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
153 Posts
you never stop getting better,practicing @ home drawing and dryfiring if your pistol will allow if not get snap caps is the best,read read read and apply and practice what you read and last but not least try to save a little bit @ a time so you can go to a professional to get some good sound training! The best Training I ever got was recently when I was taught the C.A.R. system by Paul Caslte @sabretactical, a new technique being taught to Sf and LEo improved my accuracy 3 fold.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,007 Posts
I would actually suggest getting some high-quality training as early as possible. No matter how basic you might think the things you practice are, you'd be amazed at how basic some of the bad habits people develop are. Many courses don't require any previous experience at all, and all your self-directed practice can then be focused much more effectively.
 
1 - 20 of 24 Posts
Top