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Smokin some butt!! When Winn Dixie has pork butt on sale for 99 cents a lb, you smoke a pork butt. Got it on at 8am so going to be a late night but the pulled pork feast tomorrow will be worth it. My sons troop would have had another camping trip so we put up the small tent in backyard last night. Was a great night for sleeping in a tent, cool but not cold.
 

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I went to see my Dad yesterday. It was a weekly event for many years, until two months ago. That was the start of going weekly again!

We also started band practices again this week, and took a cruise on the pontoon boat down the river and out in the Gulf Wednesday.

I’m scheduled to get the nerves in my low back burned out this coming Monday, which I hope won’t be cancelled.
 

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Discussion Starter #223
Good luck Monday, Rick. I’m still charging my spinal cord stimulator every morning. I may ride over to the port tomorrow and clean the 38
 

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Really hoping your nerve procedure goes as scheduled, Rick!
 
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Discussion Starter #226
Rick

If you ever want to get a consult with my pain guy in Altamonte Springs, let me know. I have an empty guesthouse that’s yours for the asking, extra cars, 1911’s etc.

Roger
 

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Rick

If you ever want to get a consult with my pain guy in Altamonte Springs, let me know. I have an empty guesthouse that’s yours for the asking, extra cars, 1911’s etc.

Roger
Thank you Roger! That’s a very generous offer, and I really appreciate it!
 

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I'm glad to hear it worked for you, I was warned by another person in the doctors office not to have it done because it had not worked for his wife. I was thinking my doctor had BS-ed me on the success rate.
 

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The procedure Monday went great, discounting the fact the things at the Dr’s. office were running quite a bit behind, comparatively speaking.

My ongoing pain level is much lower now, which seriously outweighs the short term pain(s) of the procedure.

Thanks again for all the well wishes from everyone; they mean a lot to me!
 

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Well, just for the heck of it, I cleaned one of my 5 on again of again carry guns, G19.
 

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Shark, your stair project looks amazing! Well done, sir!

When I bought my home years ago, the prior owner had all kinds of ramps and wheelchair access all around the house because his son was paralyzed from the waist down. Most of it was external plywood type affairs over top of the concrete walkways around the house. Over the first years I gradually removed all the external ones.

The one inside ramp I left was the one going from what was a 2-car garage into the kitchen. It's not a garage anymore, it was converted to a bedroom by the previous owner and I'd no real reason to take the ramp out. Since I just redid my whole kitchen and are now moving outward, repainting and replacing base mouldings and floors, I decided to take the ramp out and go back to a single step down from kitchen to that room. BIG mistake!

The top of the ramp came out easy enough, and it was just tapered 2x6 material supporting it from the concrete floor. When I got to the bottom, however, all hell broke loose. When they converted garage to a bedroom, they moved the door from the kitchen to the bottom of the ramp/start of the bedroom. But they built the door frame ON the ramp, not all the way to the concrete floor. So when the ramp came out, the walls on either side of the door wanted to come right along with it.

Well, long story short and a pack of Sawzall blades later, I managed to separate ramp plywood from the 2 x 4 framing, leaving a 1.25" gap from floor to bottom plate of the walls. I trimmed down some 2 x 4 material to 1.25", hammered it into place, then used a Ramset 22cal nailer to blast some nails into the concrete.

Left to do is a bunch of drywall and taping along the bottoms, primer and paint, a new floor in that room, and a new round of moldings.

This stuff is too much like work. I'd rather be back in the classroom.
 
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Well, I had an exciting after the boat ride time today.

When I cranked up to leave the dock this PM; I noticed that the gas gauge wasn’t working. So, when we got back, I started to check thimgs out. I ran down the street to the marina, and asked about getting a new gauge. My old marine mechanic buddy said he could have one there in the AM, but that the problem was usually the sending unit in the tank.

He told me to bridge across the black wire (ground) on the back of the gauge to the pink wire (signal from the sending unit in the tank). That pink wire has always been beyond my comprehension, as there’s no current there, which would be less than good to be in a gasoline tank. I’ve always just chalked it up to some sort of magic. Anyway; if the gauge goes up to “full” at that point; it shows that the gauge is good, and that the problem is probably the sending unit.

So, I pulled the dash panel, turned on the master battery switch, and turn the key on, then used my 12 V test probe to bridge across the poles on the back of the gauge. The gauge went to full, so I knew that it was OK. I pulled the probe away from the pink wire pole, and saw that the gauge was reading half full, and thought; great, it’s just a poor ground problem. Then I made a few sparks when I touched another pole on the back of the gas gauge when removing the other end of the probe, and the gauge went back to “empty.”

So, I got out my nut driver stuff to loosen/tighten the ground wire nut on the gauge pole, then noticed that nothing else electrical in the boat was working. Well, after fiddling about with wires, master switch, key switch, etc.; I guessed that the sparks I’d caused were the result of me shorting across the wrong poles, and started checking fuses.

The two main fuses below the master battery switch were both OK, so I took the covers off both battery boxes; no fuses in there. Then it was time to start removing screws and pulling panels off of the console to look for other fuses. I found one old in-line glass buss style fuse down in there, which was OK. By now, about an hour and a half had passed. I had nothing working, couldn’t raise or lower the motor, or anything.

By now, I was starting to get a bit pissed at myself, and had to tell myself that I must have caused a short, and that there HAD to be another fuse somewhere. So, sharp fellow that I am; I cast a bloodshot eye on that late model four stroke outboard motor!

Well,the less than handy angle that the motor was trimmed at, plus the location of the transom; below an upholstered sun deck across the entire back of the ‘toon, made for less than easy access. I eventually managed to get the cowling removed from the motor (no way that would have been remotely possible if I hadn’t just had the lower back nerve burns done Monday); hung over the rear of the boat, and finally located a covered “thing” that, when opened, revealed several fuses. There were two 20 amp, a 25 amp, and 15 amp fuses inside; and the 15 amp was blown!

So, another trip down to the marina for a fuse, and things were working again; including that damn fuel gauge that started all the fun!

Another 15 minutes to button down everything that I’d removed while tracking things down, and the boat was back together.

In closing, I’ll pass on a couple of lessons I learned today; If you own a boat; don’t sweat the small stuff, and carry plenty of fuses!
 

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Glad you got it sorted out Rick. (y)
 

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Discussion Starter #239
Rick

Back in the day we avoided electronically controlled diesels In offshore boats. when I was doing a re-power, even the factory rep gave me that same advice.

A friend of mine was coming back from Walker’s Cay in the Bahamas in a 38 rampage just like I own now. The seas really built up and he experienced sudden total engine shut down. The boat was rocking and pitching so badly that he could not physically get to the bow where he had stowed his life raft. He thought he was going to die and he tied himself his wife and his baby together while wearing life vests.

Fortunately someone heard his mayday call and towed him back to the island. Upon difficult and thorough examination it appears that both motors failed because some little fuse almost down in the bilge had popped.

Electronic stuff still concerns me. That’s why I keep a 1983 Mercedes turbo diesel in the garage. Glad you got your issue sorted out I know what kind of a pain that is.
 

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Rick

Back in the day we avoided electronically controlled diesels In offshore boats. when I was doing a re-power, even the factory rep gave me that same advice.

A friend of mine was coming back from Walker’s Cay in the Bahamas in a 38 rampage just like I own now. The seas really built up and he experienced sudden total engine shut down. The boat was rocking and pitching so badly that he could not physically get to the bow where he had stowed his life raft. He thought he was going to die and he tied himself his wife and his baby together while wearing life vests.

Fortunately someone heard his mayday call and towed him back to the island. Upon difficult and thorough examination it appears that both motors failed because some little fuse almost down in the bilge had popped.

Electronic stuff still concerns me. That’s why I keep a 1983 Mercedes turbo diesel in the garage. Glad you got your issue sorted out I know what kind of a pain that is.
I'm the same way and have a '79 CJ-7 project in the garage for the same reason. I used to joke with my students that I'm a big fan of "fly-by-wire" aircraft; 7x19 strands of stainless-steel wire flight control cables! :D

Although, we all know that even "old-school" technology can bite you in the butt sometimes. I nearly had to bail out one day after a rudder cable broke in the middle of a snap roll that wouldn't stop. It wasn't until I tried some quick "out-of-the-box" thinking on the third auto-rotation and got the aircraft back under control enough to get back to the runway.
 
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