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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Yep, even though I am a Life Member of the NRA, if I get an e-mail like this from the GOA, I will respond. If the GOA has a way I can support the Second Amendment, then I'll do it.

Please contact your Senators, listed in link below, and let him or her know just how many people support the Second Amendment.

Gun Owners of America E-Mail Alert
8001 Forbes Place, Suite 102, Springfield, VA 22151
Phone: 703-321-8585 / FAX: 703-321-8408
http://http://www.gunowners.org

Wednesday, September 17, 2008

Today, the U.S. House of Representatives opted to pass Representative
Childers' D.C. gun ban repeal instead of the anti-gun bill sponsored by Del.
Eleanor Holmes Norton -- which would have allowed D.C. to continue enacting
gun control.

The bill now goes to the Senate, but unless there is a ton of pressure put
on Majority Leader Harry Reid (D-NV), the bill will languish in committee.

Thankfully, Sen. Kay Bailey Hutchison (R-TX) is spearheading an effort to
get a vote on the House-passed bill. She is asking her fellow Senators to
cosponsor a letter which she will then deliver to Sen. Reid.

The Hutchison letter points out that, "In DC v. Heller, the court
affirmed
that the District of Columbia's ban on ownership of handguns was an
unconstitutional restriction on that right."

After noting that D.C. has continued to deprive its residents of their
Second Amendment rights for more than 30 years, the letter asks Sen. Reid
"to ensure that D.C. residents do not have to wait any longer to realize
their constitutional rights by allowing the full Senate to consider H.R.
6842 before the 110th Congress concludes."

(Norton's bill was the original HR 6842, but it now contains the Childers
pro-gun language instead -- thanks in no small part to your efforts.)

There are not many days left before Congress recesses for the remainder of
the year, and Sen. Reid is expected to try to run out the clock on the D.C.
repeal bill. That's why it's important to act quickly and contact your own
two U.S. Senators.

This is the last chance we have this year to put some teeth into the Supreme
Court's decision in Heller. Gun Owners of America will score the signing of
this letter in its upcoming congressional rating.

ACTION: Please contact your two Senators and ask them to cosign the Hutchison letter to Senator Reid. You can visit the Gun Owners Legislative Action Center at http://www.gunowners.org/activism.htm to send your Senators
the pre-written e-mail message below. And, you can call your Senators at
202-224-3121 or toll-free at 1-877-762-8762.
 

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I'm on it. How long can this DC injustice continue :thumbsdwn
 

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What get's me about all of this, is that how D.C. keeps stalling..........jamming......denying..........litigating..........the fact. The VERY fact! That they are denying it's citizens their Constitutional RIGHTS after the Supreme Court affirmed their/our Rights!

It just burns me.

Why don't we have a Governmental "SWAT" Unit to go in and take down Gov't leaders who attempt to deny us our Rights?

It just sickens me. D.C. & Chicago. The TWO places that rate higest in crime almost every year, ban private citizens from protecting themselves?

Gee. And Barac Hussein Obama is from Illinois, too?

Gonna love these next four years of Socialism in Action. :thumbsdwn

-Wraith
 

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Like I always say they push and get away with whatever we allow them to get away with. The president does not enact laws he can only push for the ones he wants. The Congress is the one that passes and repeals laws. If Obama is elected then he may try and push for gun control but he can not change the Supreme Court decision or go against it. Unless of course we let him. The Supreme Court is clearly friendly to the 2nd ammendment and Bush appointed a majority during his term. There is not much chance that the Supreme Court make up is going to change in the next 10 years. Politicians will do what ever they can get away with. That is why we have to keep our eyes open and our mouths cocked and ready. This nation has survived all kinds of Presidents and their policies and it will survive whoever is elected. I think the next President is going to have his hands so full with the economy and the war that he won't have much time to even think about guns. Hopefully.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
The Supreme Court is clearly friendly to the 2nd ammendment and Bush appointed a majority during his term. There is not much chance that the Supreme Court make up is going to change in the next 10 years.
Currently there are 2 possibly 3 Supreme Court Justices that may retire during this next Presidential Administration.

That means the next President will be appointing 2 maybe 3 Supreme Court Justices to LIFE terms on the Supreme Court.

The Supreme Court voted 5 to 4 in favor of the Second Amendment. If Obama is elected and is allowed to select 2 or 3 LIBERAL Supreme Court justices, the Court AND this nation could change drastically, and the Second Amendment may be changed for the worse as well.

Obama MUST be defeated, or this country is in a REAL hurt.
 

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TampaSsgt, I stand corrected on that. Who are the justices that may retire soon? I know I have never been happy with some of Justice Kennedy's decisions but I can't recall which other might retire, Thomas? I have some reservations about some of his calls but he has been pro 2A so far, I think. I don't know how Kennedy stands on 2A. Who wrote the decenting paper during the 2A hearings? I saw his name somewhere but can't recall it now.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
TampaSsgt, I stand corrected on that. Who are the justices that may retire soon? I know I have never been happy with some of Justice Kennedy's decisions but I can't recall which other might retire, Thomas? I have some reservations about some of his calls but he has been pro 2A so far, I think. I don't know how Kennedy stands on 2A. Who wrote the decenting paper during the 2A hearings? I saw his name somewhere but can't recall it now.
Below is the information on the Supreme Court Justices ..... The four oldest are 88, 75, 72 and 71. I see at least two, if not three or four of them, retiring during the next Presidential Administration. We cannot allow Obama to be the one to pick them.


http://www.usatoday.com/news/washington/2008-07-13-scotus-election_N.htm

At Supreme Court, no one rushes into retirement
Posted 7/13/2008 12:00 AM

By the time the Supreme Court reconvenes in October, five of the nine justices will be 70 or older.

AGING SUPREME COURT

The members of the Supreme Court, by age:

John Paul Stevens, 88
Ruth Bader Ginsburg, 75
Antonin Scalia, 72
Anthony Kennedy, 71
Stephen Breyer, 69
David Souter, 68
Clarence Thomas, 60
Samuel Alito, 58
John Roberts, 53

The last 10 justices to leave the Supreme Court, with their age and date of retirement:

Sandra Day O'Connor, 75, Jan. 31, 2006
William Rehnquist, 80, Sept. 3, 2005*
Harry Blackmun, 85, Aug. 3, 1994
Byron White, 76, June 28, 1993
Thurgood Marshall, 83, Oct. 1, 1991
William Brennan, 84, July 20, 1990
Lewis Powell, 79, June 26, 1987
Warren Burger, 79, Sept. 26, 1986
Potter Stewart, 66, July 3, 1981
William Douglas, 77, Nov. 12, 1975
*Died while chief justice

WASHINGTON (AP) — John Paul Stevens still plays tennis at 88. Ruth Bader Ginsburg, 75, works out regularly in the Supreme Court gym.
The oldest two justices — half the court's liberal wing — top the list of those considered likely to retire during the next presidential administration. Despite Stevens' and Ginsburg's apparent vigor, change on the Supreme Court is more likely than not over the next four years.

"One would think that over the course of the next four years the actuarial tables would catch up with the oldest members, as they do for us all," said Pepperdine University law professor Douglas Kmiec.

With five justices 70 or older by the time the court meets again in October, interest groups and commentators have been talking about the court's role in the presidential election. One change on a court that divides 5-4 in key cases can alter the results.

But their forecasts depend on three factors — who wins the presidency, who leaves the court and who is appointed.

Democrat Barack Obama would most likely be replacing liberal justices with like-minded successors, while Republican John McCain could get the chance to fulfill a campaign pledge and put a conservative justice on the court in the mold of Chief Justice John Roberts or Justice Samuel Alito.

Alito, among President George W. Bush's two selections, has repeatedly demonstrated the difference one justice can make on a closely divided court. The result in disputes over abortion, religion and school desegregation almost certainly would have been different had Sandra Day O'Connor not retired in 2006.

"Given the likely retirements, the next election probably will determine whether the court gets more conservative or stays ideologically the same," said Erwin Chemerinsky, dean of the law school at University of California, Irvine.

The Supreme Court rarely becomes a big issue in the presidential campaign and this year — with $4-a-gallon gas, steep declines in the stock market and two wars — appears to be no exception.

The one case decided recently that could have elevated the court's importance in the campaign came out in favor of Americans' gun rights, placating the highly energized and politically effective gun rights groups.

If the case "had come out the other way, we'd be having a very different conversation," Thomas Goldstein, a Supreme Court watcher and advocate, told a Federalist Society meeting a week after the guns decision.

The unpredictably of Supreme Court retirements is another reason why the court rarely becomes an issue in presidential campaigns.

What if the justices decide to grow even older together?

It has happened before. Nine of the last ten justices who retired or died in office were at least 75, and six of those were 79 or older.

No one left the court during Jimmy Carter's four years in office, Bill Clinton's second term or Bush's first.

On the other hand, six justices ranging in age from 76 to 85 stepped down between 1986 and 1994, spanning three presidencies.

And Bush had two appointments in the space of three months in 2005. He filled them with two men in their 50s, Roberts and Alito.

Goldstein boldly predicts that only Stevens will retire during the next four years and not before he surpasses Oliver Wendell Holmes to become the oldest sitting justice. That would happen in February 2011.

Goldstein's views shifted as he watched the court over the past year. He used to expect the retirement of three justices — Stevens, Ginsburg and Justice David Souter. Though only 68, Souter has made no secret that he prefers New Hampshire to Washington and intends to return there someday.

But justices find it hard to leave the court unless they're in poor health, Goldstein said.

Chief Justice William Rehnquist didn't retire even after he was diagnosed with cancer. His death in 2005 created the second vacancy for Bush.
 
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