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A Florida man fatally shot his family’s pet pit bull after it attacked his teenage stepson
Pit Bull....shocker. :rolleyes:
 

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Pit Bull....shocker. :rolleyes:
Ignorant comment about American Staffordshires . . . Shocker. :rolleyes:

Please educate yourself. Thank you.

-on Tapatalk
 

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Ignorant comment about American Staffordshires . . . Shocker. :rolleyes:

Please educate yourself. Thank you.

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Sorry my friend but I disagree, I don’t really think the comment was ignorant considering their historical past. Why is it the majority of articles or news reports about Pit Bulls has to do with hurting or killing something or someone? Why is it, at least in Florida, my homeowner insurance wanted to know if I owned any prior to writing my policy?:dunno
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Sorry my friend but I disagree, I don’t really think the comment was ignorant considering their historical past. Why is it the majority of articles or news reports about Pit Bulls has to do with hurting or killing something or someone? Why is it, at least in Florida, my homeowner insurance wanted to know if I owned any prior to writing my policy?:dunno
^^^ Agree with you
 

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Why is it the majority of articles or news reports about Pit Bulls has to do with hurting or killing something or someone? Why is it, at least in Florida, my homeowner insurance wanted to know if I owned any prior to writing my policy?:dunno
SMH

For the same reason the majority of the news reports are about "assault rifles" and Glocks.

And for the same reason your insurance company wants to know about your guns.

AKA: SENSATIONALISM!



You're trolling me, aren't you? You don't really think this way, right? Haha, funny, got me. :grin


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No buddy, I’m not trolling you and I apologize if my sarcastic comment was offensive to you. I also don’t think this one breed has been unfairly picked upon vs all other breeds. I don’t think it’s all about sensationalism either. How come you don’t here the same frequency of these stories about Shepard’s or Dobermans?

I know your a dog guy and I’m a cat guy but I also love dogs too and most animals in general. But that is one breed that I would never ever trust or own. In my opinion that would be like owning a chimpanzee or a tiger. You may go years and years without ever having a problem but when something in that animal’s brain snaps and it goes berserk, god help the people or other living creatures that are in it’s path.

Just an fyi, my insurance company has never asked about guns (yet). The only two things they were concerned with was do I own a Pit Bull and or do I have a trampoline. The way our country is going it won’t be long before they do ask about guns.
 

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My wife was mauled a month ago by a dog she was walking as a volunteer at the animal shelter. It bit all four limbs and she needed emergency surgery to save her arm. She is looking at months of rehab and may never fully recover the use of her strong side arm
It was a pit bull that had been cleared for adoption.
Retrievers retrieve, pointers point, shepherds herd. Pit Bulls attack. It is in their DNA.
 

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Discussion Starter #9 (Edited)
My wife was mauled a month ago by a dog she was walking as a volunteer at the animal shelter. It bit all four limbs and she needed emergency surgery to save her arm. She is looking at months of rehab and may never fully recover the use of her strong side arm
It was a pit bull that had been cleared for adoption.
Retrievers retrieve, pointers point, shepherds herd. Pit Bulls attack. It is in their DNA.
Its hard to argue with that !

I'm not necessarily anti Pitbull, just agreeing with the facts
 

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I've seen both kinds and my opinion is you cannot really tell unless you have some history or interaction with the dog, maybe know something about how it was raised. I've friends that have Pit Bulls and my cat is more ferocious than they are. Those dogs have just been very well socialized and aren't given to fits of sudden rage. On the other hand, I had a neighbor once in VA that chained his outside all day in the sun. Poor dog had no shade to lay in and half the time his water was gone by afternoon and I'd fill it over the fence with my hose. Spoke to the guy about it and in a couple seconds you realize the dog is way smarter than the owner. That dog, a poodle made the mistake of cutting through the backyard the Pit Bull tore him to pieces. My kids came screaming into the house and I ran out but it was too late..

So I think some of those dogs truly are dangerous and haven't good enough manners to be left unattended. I believe it's these type of dogs that the apartment complex legal team is concerned about, same for insurance companies. They're branding all dogs with the bad traits of the worst of them but you can hardly blame them since we cannot easily tell them apart without watching them for some time. Their concern is liability and the easy answer is ban them.
 

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My wife was mauled a month ago by a dog she was walking as a volunteer at the animal shelter. . . . . . . . . .It was a pit bull that had been cleared for adoption.
Retrievers retrieve, pointers point, shepherds herd. Pit Bulls attack. It is in their DNA.
Strong wishes for a speedy and complete recovery for your wife.

I totally agree with your (and joecarry and rayman's comments.) I completely disagree with the arguments of High Seas Drifter. I equate pit bull apologists explanations as the equivalent of climate change warriors postulating that global warming is a man made phenomena . (Oh, wait. I don't want to highjack the thread.) ;-)
 

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I have raised 4 without any problems they are just dogs, good and bad in all breeds. Most problems are because of bad treatment and in breeding. I hope your wife makes a full and speedy recovery.
 

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I have raised 4 without any problems they are just dogs, good and bad in all breeds. Most problems are because of bad treatment and in breeding. I hope your wife makes a full and speedy recovery.
This ^^ I’ve raised 3 without any problems.
Also agree with HSD re the news. They report any attack by mixed breeds that even remotely resemble Pit Bulls as a pit bull attack.
 

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Pit Bulls less aggressive than Chihuahuas

I've had German Shepherds, a Rottie, Pugs, Shih-Tzus, and Chihuahuas. Far and away the most aggressive dogs I've had are the Chihuahuas. People think because they are a little dog they don't pack much and be easily swatted aside if they get aggressive, but that's never happened with any Chihuahua I know. First, they are lightning fast; they can snap and take a nice little chunk out of you and be back to reading the paper before you sense the chunk is missing. Also, they're not going to just stand there and be swatted. They'll take a nip out of your fingers as they go by, duck under the hand and do the same to your cheek faster than you can react to it. They are like little Piranhas... they look docile until the cow falls in the water, then it's all business.

My Rottie only got aggressive one time and that was when I was at work and some solicitor came to the door and wasn't taking my wife's "I'm not interested, thank you" very seriously. The dog was laying down in the living room maybe 20 feet from the door and with no warning took off running and ran right into the guy. Didn't bite him, but gave him a good up close and personal look at his teeth as he barked in the guy's face. Wife said that guy literally ran backwards... never turned around, just ran backwards all the way to his car.

People who know a lot more about dogs then what little I know tell me that dogs somehow "sense" when something is amiss, perhaps sensing nervousness on my wife's part or aggression in the solicitor's part, I dunno. Whatever it was, it set him off and it was the only time in his life he ever did that.

I really believe if people work with their dogs and curb bad behaviors before they get out of control, most any dog can be acceptable, the exceptions being dogs severely abused or dogs bred by idiots who cater to the Michael Vicks of the world.

One other thing on dogs attacking kids. I don't think we always get the whole story including what actions the kid did that led up to it. I'm not saying they are all provoked, but I know of a few where the kids were doing stuff like striking the dog in the head with a stick multiple times before the dog bit one of them. No human would put up with that, why should we expect a dog to do so?
 

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One of my daughters had a pit bull *****. She was a *****cat. Very well mannered and gentle.

Coops, sorry to hear about your wife. I hope she recovers fully and carries no mental scars from the event.
 

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Have to agree with those who say it is a combination of breeding and upbringing. There are, unfortunately, a bunch of people out there who WANT an aggressive dog, and these types seem to gravitate towards pit bulls. There are a bunch of people out there who MISTREAT their dogs, and these types also seem to like pit bulls (maybe because the pit bull's natural strength allows them to withstand more mistreatment). There are people out there who crank out puppies with no regard whatsoever to the traits they are propagating; do that with a pit bull and you get a strong dog that is completely unpredictable.

A well-bred, well-treated, and well-trained pit bull is going to be as gentle and friendly with its family as any other breed. It's just that well-bred, well-treated, and well-trained pit bulls seem to be in the minority.
 

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Well, then there's science . . .

https://www.politifact.com/georgia/statements/2011/aug/03/elaine-boyer/are-pit-bulls-more-aggressive-other-dogs/

In 2008, a team of University of Pennsylvania researchers completed a study of aggressiveness of 30 breeds of dogs. . . . The results found Chihuahuas and Dachshunds were the most aggressive toward both humans and other dogs. . . . Pit bulls, the researchers found, were not significantly more aggressive than other breeds toward strangers and their owners.

The American Temperament Test Society conducts a 10-step exam and has checked out nearly 31,000 dogs . . . The two types of pit bulls (the American Pit Bull Terrier and American Staffordshire Terrier) they’ve studied have aggression scores that are not as bad as boxers, bulldogs, collies, Great Danes, Greyhounds and Shetland sheepdogs. They are in the same range as the German Shepherd and golden retriever. . . . "On an even playing field, a pit bull is no more dangerous than a collie," said Salliann Comstock, the society’s chief tester and director of operations.

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https://pets.webmd.com/dogs/features/pit-bulls-safety#1

Opponents argue that pit bulls are more likely to attack. But the ASPCA, the American Veterinary Medical Association, and some other groups have recommend against breed-specific laws. They cite a study published in the Journal of the American Veterinary Association on Sept. 15, 2000.

The study, which focused on fatal dog attacks, notes difficulties identifying various breeds (particularly mixed breeds) and in calculating a bite rate. The researchers noted that there isn’t consistent data on breed populations and bites, especially when the injury isn’t serious enough to require an ER visit.

“On any given day, probably 10 people get bit by a dog,” Gorant says. “But it’s only news when it’s a pit bull.”


>>> Hmmm . . . Like Glocks and “assault rifles.”
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In almost every measure, out of the 35 most common breeds, Chihuahuas were reported as the most aggressive, especially toward bigger dogs they have not seen before.

The American Pit Bull Terrier—a breed often portrayed as highly aggressive—consistently ranked as one of the least aggressive dogs, with the exception being toward new dogs, where it was still below Miniature Schnauzers. This could be because pit bull owners are conscious of the bias against the breed when self-reporting, but it does agree with the American Temperament Test Society, which also has found that American Pit Bull Terriers were among the most tolerant breeds.

When a hospital records that a dog who bit someone is a pit bull, they rely on the report of the victim, parents, or a witness. No one does a DNA test to make sure. Media coverage of attacks tends to encourage this misidentification: In 2008, a pit bull attack that hospitalized a woman generated 230 articles and televised reports in national and international news. A few days before, a mix-breed dog killed a 16-month-old child. The local paper reported it twice.
<<< :dunno
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https://www.nationalgeographic.com/news/2016/07/pit-bull-ban-aggressive-dog-breed-bronwen-dickey/

A study on fatalities between 2000-2009 in the journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association found that in over 80 percent of those cases there were four or more significant factors related to the care and control of the dog. These were dogs that had not been socialized; were large and sexually intact; and had no relationship to the person who was killed. In other words, perfect storm of factor upon factor.
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Here’s that study:
https://avmajournals.avma.org/doi/abs/10.2460/javma.243.12.1726

Abstract
Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association
December 15, 2013, Vol. 243, No. 12, Pages 1726-1736
https://doi.org/10.2460/javma.243.12.1726

Co-occurrence of potentially preventable factors in 256 dog bite–related fatalities in the United States (2000–2009)

Gary J. Patronek, VMD, PhD; Jeffrey J. Sacks, MD, MPH; Karen M. Delise; Donald V. Cleary, BA; Amy R. Marder, VMD

Center for Animals and Public Policy, Department of Environmental and Population Health, Cummings School of Veterinary Medicine, Tufts University, North Grafton, MA 01536. (Patronek); Sue Binder Consulting Inc, 3958 Preston Ct NE, Atlanta, GA 30319. (Sacks); National Canine Research Council, 433 Pugsley Hill Rd, Amenia, NY 12501. (Delise, Cleary); Center for Shelter Dogs at the Animal Rescue League of Boston, 10 Chandler St, Boston, MA 02116. (Marder)

The National Canine Research Council supported the efforts of Karen Delise from 2006 to 2011 for assembly of case reports and data abstraction and Kara Gilmore, JD, for assistance with data abstraction and validation from case reports.

Donald Cleary is Director of Communications and Publications at the National Canine Research Council and Treasurer of Animal Farm Foundation, parent organization of the National Canine Research Council.

Presented in part as an oral presentation at the AVMA Annual Convention, Chicago, July 2013.

Address correspondence to Dr. Patronek (gary****@***.**).

Objective—To examine potentially preventable factors in human dog bite–related fatalities (DBRFs) on the basis of data from sources that were more complete, verifiable, and accurate than media reports used in previous studies.

Design—Prospective case series.

Sample—256 DBRFs occurring in the United States from 2000 to 2009.

Procedures—DBRFs were identified from media reports and detailed histories were compiled on the basis of reports from homicide detectives, animal control reports, and interviews with investigators for coding and descriptive analysis.

Results—Major co-occurrent factors for the 256 DBRFs included absence of an able-bodied person to intervene (n = 223 [87.1%]), incidental or no familiar relationship of victims with dogs (218 [85.2%]), owner failure to neuter dogs (216 [84.4%]), compromised ability of victims to interact appropriately with dogs (198 [77.4%]), dogs kept isolated from regular positive human interactions versus family dogs (195 [76.2%]), owners’ prior mismanagement of dogs (96 [37.5%]), and owners’ history of abuse or neglect of dogs (54 [21.1%]). Four or more of these factors co-occurred in 206 (80.5%) deaths. For 401 dogs described in various media accounts, reported breed differed for 124 (30.9%); for 346 dogs with both media and animal control breed reports, breed differed for 139 (40.2%). Valid breed determination was possible for only 45 (17.6%) DBRFs; 20 breeds, including 2 known mixes, were identified.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Most DBRFs were characterized by coincident, preventable factors; breed was not one of these. Study results supported previous recommendations for multifactorial approaches, instead of single-factor solutions such as breed-specific legislation, for dog bite prevention.

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And last but not least, if folks can’t grasp this concept, well, then there’s no use furthering the conversation. Educate yourselves, folks. Knowledge is power. As it was told to me, “Believe none of what you hear, and half of what you see.”


https://www.aspca.org/about-us/aspca-policy-and-position-statements/position-statement-pit-bulls

While a dog’s genetics may predispose it to behave in certain ways, genetics do not exist in a vacuum. Rather, behavior develops through a complex interaction between environment and genetics. This is an especially important consideration when we look at an individual dog versus a breed. Many diverse and sometimes subtle factors influence the development of behavior, including, but not limited to, early nutrition, stress levels experienced by the mother during pregnancy, and even temperature in the womb. And when it comes to influencing the behavior of an individual dog, factors such as housing conditions and the history of social interactions play pivotal roles in behavioral development. The factors that feed into the expression of behavior are so inextricably intertwined that it’s usually impossible to point to any one specific influence that accounts for a dog becoming aggressive. This is why there is such variation in behavior between individual dogs, even when they are of the same breed and bred for the same purpose. Because of the impact of experience, the pit bull specifically bred for generations to be aggressive may not fight with dogs and the Labrador retriever bred to be a service dog may be aggressive toward people.
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Anyone, please feel free to respond with articles disproving the data I’ve cited here. If I am mistaken and the data bears this out, I will gladly revaluate my position. Such is the nature of science.
 

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Discussion Starter #20
FYI - the intent of my post wasn't really about Pit Bulls, just about using his gun to protect son.

I've been bit by dogs at least 5 or 6 times in my lifetime, all of them got my foot up their ass in one form or another. :laughing. Yes, poor owners. I wished that I couldn't put my foot up theirs also
 
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