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Discussion Starter #1
Specifically, will it hurt to shoot Tula .357 Mag through a M&P 340?
 

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You should be fine. Do keep a dowel just in case a case or two gets stuck.
 

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As has been alluded to, the chambers may be tight enough to find a fired case or two sticks in the chamber/s. What I don't like about the idea of steel case on steel cylinder is possibly scoring the cylinder chambers. Not something I'd chance in my own revos.

Aluminum cases? Brass cases? They are softer than the steel used in the cylinder so chance of scoring the inside of the cylinder chambers is nill.
 

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As has been alluded to, the chambers may be tight enough to find a fired case or two sticks in the chamber/s. What I don't like about the idea of steel case on steel cylinder is possibly scoring the cylinder chambers. Not something I'd chance in my own revos.

Aluminum cases? Brass cases? They are softer than the steel used in the cylinder so chance of scoring the inside of the cylinder chambers is nill.
The steel alloy used for the cases is pretty soft. Much softer than the heat treated steels used in modern firearms. It has to be to obdurate and make a gas seal.

So while I agree that scoring the chamber is statistically more likely using steel cased ammo, the probability is still pretty low, perhaps slightly greater probability than having a brass or aluminum case fail.

Would I shoot it in a collector piece like a Colt Python? No.

But in a regular run of the mill revolver? Sure.

That said, I would not fire steel cased ammo in anything if the lacquer or polymer finish had been removed from case. The coating acts as a lubricant, and prevents galling. This coating can cook off and degrade in a hot chamber., so I would not allow the cylinder to get too hot either.
 

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The steel alloy used for the cases is pretty soft. Much softer than the heat treated steels used in modern firearms. It has to be to obdurate and make a gas seal.

So while I agree that scoring the chamber is statistically more likely using steel cased ammo, the probability is still pretty low, perhaps slightly greater probability than having a brass or aluminum case fail.

Would I shoot it in a collector piece like a Colt Python? No.

But in a regular run of the mill revolver? Sure.

That said, I would not fire steel cased ammo in anything if the lacquer or polymer finish had been removed from case. The coating acts as a lubricant, and prevents galling. This coating can cook off and degrade in a hot chamber., so I would not allow the cylinder to get too hot either.
The scoring would be more of a concern upon extracting the expanded cases after firing. Especially with tight chamber/s. Steel on steel will accelerate wear, how much over time would be anyone's guess.

ETA, if you wouldn't shoot it in a Python, there must be some apprehension over the steel on steel yes?
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Doesn't sound like the cost savings is worth it.

Thanks for the info, guys! :thumsup

-on Tapatalk
 
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