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I went to the range again today and as usual I came back with more questions than answers. The first pistol I bought was a refurbished Sig P226, I was a very happy camper with it until I got my J frame, my CCW permit and started reading about the subject. My concern today is that the P226 has two completely different trigger pulls when in double action and after the first round is fired and the hammer is now in cocked position. I am concerned that this will require to commit to muscle memory two completely different "feels" since on double action I have to exert significant pressure on the trigger through the whole "travel" of the trigger as compared to the singe action trigger pull where more than the first half of the "travel" has almost no resistence. Would I be better off with a double action only pistol like a Glock or even a DAO Sig?

I like the fract that the hamerless J frame that I have the trigger pull is always the same. Any thoughts greately appreciated.
 

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I have the same so called "issue" with my HK USP. I just practice using both actions.

After every shot you can de-cock the hammer and take another shot. This helped me become more comfortable with the longer trigger pull.... Hope this helps.

You can change the variants of your pistol to make your gun DAO if you felt it necessary.
 

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I'd say practice with what you have, then rent a Glock and see what you're more comfortable with. I carry what I'm most comfortable with and that's not necessarily the gun I enjoy shooting the most. I've got a 686 Smith that I love to shoot but would probably never carry concealed.
 

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The DA/SA vs. SA vs. DAO has been debated in the gun press ad nauseum. My opinion is if you can master the long double action trigger pull then you can master them all. I don't have any problem with the transition. YMMV.
 

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Just to add more to the mix. Rent a Glock26 with the grip extension and see how it feels to shoot and carry. If you like it then you'll get the added benefit of the 10+1 capacity over the revolver.
 

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I carried a 3rd gen. Smith for several years as a primary duty/ccw firearm. I learned the DA/SA well, but in the end, I went back to SA autos and then to Glocks as primary carry. They just suit me better.

Nothing wrong at all with DA/SA, but you do have to train to be competent/confident with the transitions. I had to re-learn this when I had to carry an M9 for duty, so I bought one to practice with.

Don't have to worry about that any longer, so it's back to Glocks and Hi-Powers.
 

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The DA/SA or DAO takes more dedication to time on trigger for most to be as proficient as they are with an SA trigger as a rule.

That dedication to master the DA/SA trigger will usually result in the person being a much better shooter overall with various handguns in the long run.

I ran with a Sig 226, then later with a Sig 228 on one dept., putting 35K+ through the 228 in 5 years from 91-96. The more I shot it, the better I got with it till it wasn't any more difficult to shoot than my govt model 1911's I carried in the private sector.

I've been carrying my Sig 220 "carry" model [ 45acp ] the last few days out here as well. I'm probably not quite as fast on the first shot with it vs. my glock 17 or glock 21sf in the long run, but it's not that much slower to worry about it.

I sent it back to Sig to have the SRT [ Short Reset Trigger ] put in it. Now once that first round is gone, few guns can keep up with the subsequent shots on threat. It actually took me by surprise on the first transition from DA/SA when I got it back, the reset is that short. Took some getting used to [ maybe 50 rds ] but it's oh so sweet.

Brownie
 

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The DA/SA or DAO takes more dedication to time on trigger for most to be as proficient as they are with an SA trigger as a rule.

That dedication to master the DA/SA trigger will usually result in the person being a much better shooter overall with various handguns in the long run.

I ran with a Sig 226, then later with a Sig 228 on one dept., putting 35K+ through the 228 in 5 years from 91-96. The more I shot it, the better I got with it till it wasn't any more difficult to shoot than my govt model 1911's I carried in the private sector.

I've been carrying my Sig 220 "carry" model [ 45acp ] the last few days out here as well. I'm probably not quite as fast on the first shot with it vs. my glock 17 or glock 21sf in the long run, but it's not that much slower to worry about it.

I sent it back to Sig to have the SRT [ Short Reset Trigger ] put in it. Now once that first round is gone, few guns can keep up with the subsequent shots on threat. It actually took me by surprise on the first transition from DA/SA when I got it back, the reset is that short. Took some getting used to [ maybe 50 rds ] but it's oh so sweet.

Brownie
I agree, Brownie. That SRT is sweeeeet! My bud has it in a couple of his SIGs. Almost makes me want to buy another one....................almost. :D
 

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Many people have learned to use a DA/SA action effectively. It will really depend on you and the amount of time you devote to familiarizing yourself with it.

The DA/SA action does have the disadvantage of having to become accustomed to two different trigger pulls. However, it can be said that the first long DA trigger pull is advantageous in stressful/self-defense situations, preventing you from accidentally pulling a "hair trigger" when your adrenaline is pumping or when you get startled.

-JT
 

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The DA/SA trigger in my experiance is not really very hard to master with proper practice. It's all about proper trigger control and how you reset the trigger.

Proper trigger control dictates that once you break a shot that you hold the trigger fully to the rear until you've reacquired your sight picture at which time you allow the trigger just far enough forward to feel the reset (click) then begin your next trigger press.

This helps to eliminate the tendency to slap the trigger or accelerate through the trigger during the press.

With your 226 concentrate on a smooth continuous trigger press through the double action cycle, hold the trigger back through the recoil cycle and while reacquiring your sights. Once you've reestablished your sight picture slowly allow your trigger forward until you feel the reset. Once you feel the reset you stop the forward motion and begin your trigger press again. Repeat.

Hope this helps
 

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Proper trigger control dictates that once you break a shot that you hold the trigger fully to the rear until you've reacquired your sight picture at which time you allow the trigger just far enough forward to feel the reset (click) then begin your next trigger press.

That may be the proper trigger control for some, but it's not the only proper trigger control that can be used successfully.

The fastest trigger fingers with accuracy on the gaming circuits slap the triggers, though I find I'm resetting my trigger with let off and back on it again waiting to press the next shot is faster than the quote above for me.

There are several ways to gain trigger control with a DA/SA or SAO trigger.

Brownie
 
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