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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
In the martial arts community, we hear it often, "martial arts is a lifestyle." As much as I dislike quick catch phrases, it it hard to argue with that fact. Martial arts truly is a lifestyle. In the same fashion, concealed carry can also be a lifestyle.

Let me explain.

When you start marital arts as a white belt there is a lot to learn and it is not always easy. Training in a martial arts school can at times be extremely brutal and demanding. (traditional schools are almost impossible to find these days due to legal issues and insurance coverage). Student quickly discover that to reach the rank of a black belt is not an easy chore. Along with long hard hours it takes perseverance, dedication, and a conquering of fears and insecurities. Because it requires so much of a person, we hear students exclaim, it's a lifestyle! And indeed it is.

I believe the same is true of being proficient as a concealed carry weapons license holder. Once you get your license, there a lot of decisions to make, as well as costs involved in order to carry your weapon. From gun choices, and holsters, to more demanding concepts, like what do I do in a self defense situation. Yes there are legal as well as moral issues involved. Concealed carry can be demanding and most likely it will impact your lifestyle. Like the martial arts, concealed carry can be a lifestyle.

Fortunately, the level of involvement in concealed carry is up to the individual. There are many who have the license who feel they are at low risk and do not need to go deeper. Others believe they want to be as fully trained and prepared as possible to take on any self defense situation that they will be exposed to. And deeper still are individuals who believe they are sheepdogs who will come to the aid of those in need - putting themselves in the shoes of a person requiring legally accepted self defense assistance.

No matter your level of involvement, being a concealed carry holder can and will impact your life in someway (unless you choose to not carry at all). From changing your wardrobe, to being more aware or your environment, from taking more practice time at the range to studying legal issues, and a multitude of other factors, concealed carry can become a lifestyle. Like the martial arts it can require discipline, dedication, and a conquering of fears and insecurities. And like the martial arts it can also bring a feeling of accomplishment, comfort, and other rewards.

I am personally proud to be a concealed carry weapons license holder and have helped dozens of people through the process of obtaining their license. Whatever your level of involvement or commitment, I salute you. Congratulations on your decision to carry.

If you would be kind enough to contribute how carrying a weapon has impacted your lifestyle, either the good or the bad, and your level of involvement, please post here.

Thank you,
Patriot Prepper
Martial arts instructor, weapons trainer, executive protection, bodyguard
 

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Good post. I, too, practiced martial arts for many years at a very traditional DOJO. My Sensie was a native of Okinawa.

It took me many years of hard work and dedication to get my third Dan, of which I remain proud of to this day.

It changed my lifestyle in a similar way in which carrying a gun has done.

That is, after I became a black belt, I studiously avoided places and situations that could involve me in a confronation. I would walk away from an incident, I would not have walked away from before, bearing in mind I was much younger and stronger then, because I did not want to have to hurt someone. My Sensei always empathized that our martial arts skill was for defense only, he told us to run, if possible, before using the skill to injure.

And, I think that the same is true with respect to carrying a gun.

I do the same today while carrying, and I always carry. I am much less aggressive on the road and do everything possible to avoid a confronatation. In fact, I think that I am a better person because I carry. I am more considerate, less quick to anger and more willing to help others.

Because of this mindset, which I believe is pretty much accepted by most people who carry, I think that the axiom"an arned society is a more civil society" is an absolute truism.
 

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PP, what types of martial arts do you teach specifically?

I'd love to learn more and take classes in some form of self defense but all I've done so far are a few Jiu Jitsu classes a few years back. I wish gun ownership/CC is as easy and hassle-free as learning martial arts. Even a young child can learn it, but not firearm use without proper guidance from an adult. Not to mention all the laws for gun ownership. The big difference IMO is that a person who cannot legally own a firearm can still protect himself using martial arts.

Maybe I watch too many Jackie Chan and Jet Li movies. Lol
 

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I've been involved with handguns for home defense for about 25 years. I decided to carry about 6 months ago in anticipation of our drive to Florida and moving to an unfamiliar area. No martial arts training beyond a few very basic defense moves.

So, having been involved with handguns (and rifle) for a while, and having home defense plans in place, the move to carrying was easier than for someone new to handguns. I went through the usual "everyone knows" self-concious stage, got my IWB Supertuck to stop squeaking, got a pocket holster for my old 380, and I've been carrying (while awake) ever since.

Situational awareness has increased dramatically, even though I have been more aware than most for decades. Since I won't win hand-to-hand, the constant presence of my EDC provides some level of comfort that I still may have a fighting chance should the situation ever (hopefuly never) arise.

I am at the range more often, practice drawing and dry-fire point shooting, and now have the weapon close at hand when sleeping.

From my perspective, all positive things once I got used to carrying around the extra weight and rearranging my pockets.

I must also say that carrying is much easier here in Florida. Back in Ohio, any store can post a no carry sign which would be a misdemeanor and fine to violate. Much better here where I don't have to disarm to go into the grocery store!
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
PP, what types of martial arts do you teach specifically?

I'd love to learn more and take classes in some form of self defense but all I've done so far are a few Jiu Jitsu classes a few years back. I wish gun ownership/CC is as easy and hassle-free as learning martial arts. Even a young child can learn it, but not firearm use without proper guidance from an adult. Not to mention all the laws for gun ownership. The big difference IMO is that a person who cannot legally own a firearm can still protect himself using martial arts.


Maybe I watch too many Jackie Chan and Jet Li movies. Lol
Thanks for the response. I did not want the thread to be about me. I wanted it to be more about how being a concealed weapon holder has impacted your lifestyle. So I will try to be brief.

I love the martial arts and have studied them since I was 5 years old and had my own schools. But not until I found the right master did my life truly change. I credit his teachings with turning me from a bad guy to a good guy. More than the art that you choose, I believe the instructor or master is what is the determining factor.

Also note that if you are a black belt and punch or kick someone, even in self defense, it could be construed as lethal force. Martial arts are also a diminishing skill that requires constant practice and dedication. I love the martial arts and practice everyday, but I still carry several firearms including a .45 and a 9mm. Martial arts skills cannot cover all defense situations or replace a gun.

I am in the process of trying to purchase 400 acres and have a training facility that teaches H2H, and firearm tactics. There are more challenges than I first thought. Will keep you posted.

Jackie Chan and Jet Li are excellent martial artists and athletes. LOL, yes there might just be a little bit of exaggeration in the movies.
 

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My entire adult life (actually MOST of my life), has been involved with guns. I learned to shoot at 5. My father was a police officer for 30 years. Add my time in the Army and my current occupation (see the "handle") and I guess you could say that I've made no changes for a "Concealed Carry" lifestyle.

It is, and has always been, my lifestyle.
 

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But you didn't mention the art you study/teach? I'm curious too.

Chan and Li are Kung Fu guys (anyone notice the new Karate Kid movie should have been titled Kung Fu Kid?). I like the history of Kung Fu (Wing Chun, Southern and Praying Mantis, Northern) but have always been partial to Aikido. Aikijitsu to be more exact- follow through. That said, I'm looking into Krav Maga right now. That one really isn't an "art" as much as it is a training course. If my thoughts are correct, one should be able to learn KM in a relatively short amount of time without needing to "learn" more but rather train more, yes?

Sorry if we're still derailing this thread but, quite honestly, MA goes hand-in-hand with concealed carry. Your gun malfunctions, is taken away, you can't get to it, etc., what do you do? Right?
 

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Thanks for the response. I did not want the thread to be about me. I wanted it to be more about how being a concealed weapon holder has impacted your lifestyle. So I will try to be brief.

I love the martial arts and have studied them since I was 5 years old and had my own schools. But not until I found the right master did my life truly change. I credit his teachings with turning me from a bad guy to a good guy. More than the art that you choose, I believe the instructor or master is what is the determining factor.

Also note that if you are a black belt and punch or kick someone, even in self defense, it could be construed as lethal force. Martial arts are also a diminishing skill that requires constant practice and dedication. I love the martial arts and practice everyday, but I still carry several firearms including a .45 and a 9mm. Martial arts skills cannot cover all defense situations or replace a gun.

I am in the process of trying to purchase 400 acres and have a training facility that teaches H2H, and firearm tactics. There are more challenges than I first thought. Will keep you posted.

Jackie Chan and Jet Li are excellent martial artists and athletes. LOL, yes there might just be a little bit of exaggeration in the movies.
I hope you're not suggesting the "registered hands" idea heard so often on the internet [ along with the boxers having "registered hands" idea ]. A martial art master [ lets say black belt and above would qualify ] isn't going to be a qualifier in any court as long as the martial artist stopped the defense of his/her person when the threat which warranted the action has ceased. With more rather than less dojo's just pushing people their belts and handing out certs, I'm not automatically immediately impressed, they'll have to physically demonstrate their ability.

I've never stepped foot in a dojo [ other than to train other martial artists students and instructors ] nor have dojo type training, but there are few who would consider me anything but "martial" in several disciplines such as hands/knives/sticks along with firearms. In other words, being "martial" in mentality and skills doesn't really require a stint for years in a dojo.

I have trained with a well recognized name in the "arts". His name is Dan Insanto. We worked on "sticky hands" inside the Flynt mansion during the late nights when I had Danny and his partner working at the mansion.

Concealed carry isn't a lifestyle, it's a mentality one develops to always go heeled unless restricted by law for some reason. It might be a lifestyle if you work as an undercover operative professionally.

No black belt here, or 1-10th Dan designation etc. but I've ceretainly had these people in my H2h and defensive edged weapons classes.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
But you didn't mention the art you study/teach? I'm curious too.

Chan and Li are Kung Fu guys (anyone notice the new Karate Kid movie should have been titled Kung Fu Kid?). I like the history of Kung Fu (Wing Chun, Southern and Praying Mantis, Northern) but have always been partial to Aikido. Aikijitsu to be more exact- follow through. That said, I'm looking into Krav Maga right now. That one really isn't an "art" as much as it is a training course. If my thoughts are correct, one should be able to learn KM in a relatively short amount of time without needing to "learn" more but rather train more, yes?

Sorry if we're still derailing this thread but, quite honestly, MA goes hand-in-hand with concealed carry. Your gun malfunctions, is taken away, you can't get to it, etc., what do you do? Right?
I do not like mentioning styles because it can arouse debate and conflict over which is best. But I studied under many masters, yet have only one true master. I have also studied many styles, including but not limited to TaeKwondo, Hapkido, etc.

I studied Hapkido (Korean) for over 15 year and it is very similar to Aikido. The roots of Hapkido come from Aikido. Hapkido uses the circular movements and the water principles of Aikido but integrates more kicking and punching styles. I like Aikido, great art. When Steve Segal was filming his first movie, I was on the set hanging out for a couple of days. It was cool. He studied Aikido. I am an expert in KI (not a master) and have also taught KI exercise and meditation.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 · (Edited)
I hope you're not suggesting the "registered hands" idea heard so often on the internet [ along with the boxers having "registered hands" idea ]. A martial art master [ lets say black belt and above would qualify ] isn't going to be a qualifier in any court as long as the martial artist stopped the defense of his/her person when the threat which warranted the action has ceased. With more rather than less dojo's handing out certs

I've never stepped foot in a dojo [ other than to train other martial artists students and instructors ] nor have dojo type training, but there are few who would consider me anything but "martial" in several disciplines such as hands/knives/sticks along with firearms. In other words, being "martial" in mentality and skills doesn't really require a stint for years in a dojo.

I have trained with a well recognized name in the "arts". His name is Dan Insanto. We worked on "sticky hands" inside the Flynt mansion during the late nights when I had Danny and his partner working at the mansion.

Concealed carry isn't a lifestyle, it's a mentality one develops to always go heeled unless restricted by law for some reason. It might be a lifestyle if you work as an undercover operative professionally.

No black belt here, or 1-10th Dan designation etc. but I've ceretainly had these people in my H2h and defensive edged weapons classes.
This thread is getting a little off track. Oh well, it is supposed to be about concealed carry and how it impacts one's life (lifestyle).

No way in the world would I dream of registering hands LOL. Are you kidding? I am not one for more rules and regulations. I am talking reference to the fact that professional boxers, black belts, in court cases have been deemed to have used lethal force because of their level of skill. Please don't debate that here or the thread can turn into an arena. Want to keep it on subject. Hope that clarifies that subject. Won't be a registering my hands.

I trained under Dan Insanto in a weekend seminar. I was invited by a friend who was one of Insanto's black belts and a Kali black belt. Dan is a great and wonderful person. His techniques were highly creative. The advanced techniques he was teaching at the seminar were not simple and would be too complex for most people to use on the street. He is a great guy and I have not seen him in over 15 years.

From my understanding you trained with James Keating. You should make a thread about that - it would be interesting.

I would like to keep this thread on track. And for some people martial arts is a life style as well as concealed carry. For other it may not be. That is what I am trying to discuss here. I appreciate your comment.
 

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My entire adult life (actually MOST of my life), has been involved with guns. I learned to shoot at 5. My father was a police officer for 30 years. Add my time in the Army and my current occupation (see the "handle") and I guess you could say that I've made no changes for a "Concealed Carry" lifestyle.

It is, and has always been, my lifestyle.
I am not in LE, but otherwise I am pretty much like you.

"Carrying" has not changed my life style, just like having joined a "Motorcycle Club" a few years didn't change my lifestyle either.
Having to deal with emergencies while flying and also getting older and accepting it did change my lifestyle.
Being diagnosed with cancer 9 months ago slightly changed my attitude.
OTOH, I started Martial Arts in Japan when I was 14; it took me a long time 20-30 years to understand the "-do".
So maybe my lifestyle changed then and I don't know it.
 

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Sure appreciate your effort to keep the thread on track Pepper. Good job.

I recall hearing the phrase "gun culture" for the first time back in the early 80's, and kinda choking on it a bit. I grew up with them, and owned one before I knew what they were. To find myself pigeon-holed was just, well, foreign. I'm now well-traveled and well-heeled in all things American, and understand. Though I think its a bit sad.

I don't know that I'd say self-defense is a "way of life" for me. Its just a "thing of life" for me. But maybe it should be approached as a "way of life" by those coming to it from some other "pigeon hole." At least for awhile, 'til the head gets around it all. I certainly don't carry a gun because I'm afraid! And I mean that in a large sense, that is, I'm not afraid to die. But to live with a situation that I obviously have the ability to correct but didn't, that is another story. And that idea is at the heart of my attitude toward self-defense.

Martial arts was foreign to me. I came to it from the outside, and have enjoyed my dabblings. As I get older I look around constantly and think, "I'm as old as that person!" I'm not, and martial arts, and a generally active life are the reason why. I wish more would get involved, they'd be better off for it!

I wish more would get involved with their lives. Period. Take responsibility, rather than taking out loans because a banker "said they could" and such. Try new things. Be active. Live! And help others to do the same. And of course, be vigilant: relatively ready and able to both nurture and protect.

Just my ramblings. I'm having a good life! I hope ya'll are too. If you're not I'd suggest that you may be on the wrong forum, 'cause I don't see how you can argue that you have much to protect!
 

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Carrying Concealed, all the time? You could call that a lifestyle, I think.

Martial arts, of any kind, gives you the less lethal option, that is not so bad a thing to have in your kit bag!

From what I have heard (read!) on the forum, quite a few of the posters have had extensive MA Training, not a bad thing at all!

My own skill in fighting, comes from fighting, a lot. So taking the fight forward, especially against more than one assailant, calls for instant attack, in response to a threat, some times, what later proves to have been a perceived threat!

So breaking a nose, or arm, can hurt, when some one goes at you in a public place, some places drag you into conflict, but having said that, drawing a Hi Capacity 9mm, and leaving a couple of men on the ground, dead, or on their way to that state, is way more serious than, some kicks and punches? Yes?

The threat starts the clock ticking, the particular method of attack, is dependent on your many solutions in your tool box. I hope you pick the right one.
 

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I can't say that carrying has impacted my life much, aside from wardrobe choices and the occasional "oh dear, I'm not supposed to be carrying in here" and having to run out to the car.
I forget it's even there most of the time, and have gone to work and started my shift only to have to 'run back to the car' real quick.
I can say that in my adult life, I can't remember the last time I was in a fight. I just am not in those kinds of situations. I go to work, come home, play with my toys in the garage, or my art...hang out with the little woman, train my dog, go to bed, and start over.
My dad could probably count on 2 fingers the fist fights he has been in as an adult, driving a truck in Los Angeles for better than 30 years, it's just situational awareness I suppose, maybe luck?
I've had to stand my ground a few times, but nothing major comes of it, I don't hang out in bars, rough parts of town, and I avoid social activities with people who are known to have temper or control issues. I just don't need that in my life.
So the only impact I can say carrying has had on my life has been just one more thing I have to grab in the morning before I head out the door..my keys, wallet, phone, backpack, lighter, cigarettes, pocket knife... I swear sometimes I feel like I'm carrying Batmans belt!!

Jess
 

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Hi knapper,

About to become unpopular (you already are unpopular!) leave the lighter and Cigarettes! My Mum who was a robust, strong Lady, as my Dads helper in his Pub, died of Lung Cancer, just on 87 lbs when she went. She smoked two packs of Woodbines a day!

Going in hiding now! The devil made me say it.
 

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Great post.

With CC, it is a great responsibility. It is with the license, one must be well versed with the law of carry, use of deadly force and situational awareness. I know of some who refuse to learn more than what they learned at some 3 hour concealed carry class. In addition to the intellectual and mental preparedness, it is the physical action that one must also prepare. Shooting from various positions. Drawing from concealment.

The license is not an End to a means. In fact it is only the beginning of a new method of protecting one's self and the citizens around them.
 

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For me, most of the things that have change are not at the surface level. For example, I haven't changed my wardrobe, aside from buying a few belts (Buying holsters is a given, so I don't consider that part of the "surface" changes). It's mostly my mentality and behavior that have changed. For example, I generally avoid places where I think I might need to use my firearm (even though I will still stop at a gas station to fill up in the middle of the night, against everyone's expressed feelings on the topic. Excuse me, but if I've driven over 350 miles in a day, and I still need to get home, I'll go fill up when I go fill up :rolleyes:), and do my best to avoid places were I am not allowed to carry by law (except for school, but I kinda need to attend class! :rofl).
 

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Great post.

With CC, it is a great responsibility. It is with the license, one must be well versed with the law of carry, use of deadly force and situational awareness. I know of some who refuse to learn more than what they learned at some 3 hour concealed carry class. In addition to the intellectual and mental preparedness, it is the physical action that one must also prepare. Shooting from various positions. Drawing from concealment.

The license is not an End to a means. In fact it is only the beginning of a new method of protecting one's self and the citizens around them.
I will 2nd that. At yesterday's Open Carry Fishing Event at Metro Park in Jacksonville, the security guard cited he has a CWFL but was unaware of the OC for hunting, camping & fishing. He;s not the only one carrying without enough education.
 

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Lifestyle Changes

I think someting M. Ayoob said "In the Gravest Extreme" pretty well sums it up for most of us who carry all the time.

"A man carrying a gun for the first time is acutely, even uncomfortably aware of its presence. After a time, he ceases to notice both the weight and the responsibility, not because he has forgotten them, but because they have both been assimilated into his bearing and demeanor."

I think it is this assimilation into our "bearing and demeanor" that is the biggest change in lifestyle.

"Carry On"

Bob

:usa :wave
 
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