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The other day, I "sliced the pie" walking through my dimly-lit house.

I can't imagine that not being anything but an utterly nerve-wracking experience if it was necessary to do that for real. The only way to not feel vulnerable at all would be to have your house designed as one big room, with no partitions or dividers of any kind to block your view. And floodlights on all the time.

Unless I need to get family out or check on their safety, I think I'm leaving it to the pros.

-JT
 

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If me and my lady are home alone I'll stay in the bedroom and pray for anyone who tries to enter forcefully. If my kids are home then I'm going to go get them. They are under strict orders to stay in their room with the door locked if the alarm goes off at night. They will only open the door for me. I hope I never have to encounter anything like this.
 

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It can be a problem, all right.

If you hear a noise that you think might be an intruder, but probably isn’t, you’ll have to go look. Otherwise, you’ll never get any sleep.

If you’re sure it’s an intruder and you don’t have kids in another room, you’re better off staying where you are, locking the door and calling 911. Get behind something solid and cover the door. If there are kids in the house, dial 911, leave it off the hook or have your spouse do the talking, while you go.
There are varying opinions on whether to turn on the lights, use a flashlight or depend on your knowledge of your home and your night vision. If you choose the latter, be sure you can tell your kids from teenage burglars and invest in a good set of night sights
 

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All my children are adults (and gun owners), but only one still lives at home with me and the wife. Assuming that all three of my kids were home visiting and somebody tried to break into my house, that would be an incredibly dangerous situation for the burglar...once inside, he'd basically be surrounded by armed individuals. He'd probably get shot no matter which door he opened. :rolf
 

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All my children are adults (and gun owners), but only one still lives at home with me and the wife. Assuming that all three of my kids were home visiting and somebody tried to break into my house, that would be an incredibly dangerous situation for the burglar...once inside, he'd basically be surrounded by armed individuals. He'd probably get shot no matter which door he opened. :rolf
You wouldn't happen to read Heinlein would you?
 

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The other day, I "sliced the pie" walking through my dimly-lit house.

I can't imagine that not being anything but an utterly nerve-wracking experience if it was necessary to do that for real. The only way to not feel vulnerable at all would be to have your house designed as one big room, with no partitions or dividers of any kind to block your view. And floodlights on all the time.

Unless I need to get family out or check on their safety, I think I'm leaving it to the pros.

-JT
Clearing rooms, in rooms that you know, can be utterly terrifying!

Had to clear my old house in Michigan, many years ago. We came home and the front door was wide open. Late at night, no kids, no dogs...............just a wide open front door.

All I had was a .357 Taurus on me, and all my weapons were IN the house!

Spooky.

To clear a room alone, (without four Squad Members behind you, with M-4's and a SAW close by.........)

Never, ever, ever stick that weapon out in front of you, like they do in the movies. Keep it close-in to your body, and under your control. Keep it pointed in front of you. Let's be honest here..........

Most handgun fights/confrontations occur within 5-10 feet.

But that's why cops use big, long, flashlights. (or wait for reinforcements.) I've cleared one house alone..... alone. Don't want to do it again.


-Wraith
 

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Having had professional counter-terr/counter subversion training from former agents of ww2 OSS [ Office of Strategic Services ] and former company men back in 81----------

Having had two weeks of formal LE swat training with 2 and 4 man team exercises within two years of each other back in the mid 90's---------

Having had the pleasure of searching dwellings/buildings with unknowns inside on patrol call at 2-4am with other officer/s with no such formal training in clearing/searching skills [ might be better off searching alone here with the uninformed uniformed help ] from the early 90's into the early 21st century too many times to count-----------

Having had too numerous experiences of entering abandoned buildings in the worst projects of Boston and Providence, RI while in the private sector looking/going through hallways/rooms in search of some form of "evidence" and running into vagrants/drug addicts/street urchins who were willing to fight/kill you on site for thinking you were heat and going to pop them for their drugs/activities [ they had that nothing to lose mentality ]--------

Some thoughts/suggestions for others to contemplate in this subject area:

You either have the element of surprise by stealth [ stealth here means you've not made any noise whatsoever getting your weapon/s ready like bumping around or opening drawers, moving about too much before heading out of the bedroom, talking to the significant other about what to do, etc ] to then try to go search out "something" that alerted you to having potential intruder/s in your dwelling----

Given up the possible element of surprise from any of the above activities you then become dynamic in your actions knowing the "who/what" has your location and is laying in wait because of the advance notice from the above activities.

If you have total stealth on your side, and you are sure you do, then it's going to depend on how much you understand about how to search properly, examples would include but are not limited to-----

Not producing an outline effect in fatal funnels like doorways, hallways, windows, stairwells as you move any longer than necessary, not hanging/hugging up along walls, etc as well as learning how you can search and see around a corner without another person on the other side who might be waiting for you to come around it first to identify someones presence and where/how far they are from the corner on the other side [ giving you advance notice not to cut the pie to begin with ] and many other neat little tricks of the trade not often mention with specifics openly such as this forum [ so the BG's who might read it can be aware of how you can find them without their knowledge while they lay in wait to blindside you ].

The above coupled with superior gun handling skills to make shots from low ready or any ready position you find yourself in at the moment of truth [ should that happen ] without waiting to bring the gun to line of sight, etc.

Don't have the gun skills, the training in the tricks I've alluded to above, the mindset to "make it happen" and take and keep control of any situation that might develop as you enter, don't have the mindset that you will be taking one or more out without hesitation?----

STAY PUT.

If you are safe in a room, you stay safe in the room and can control one entry point [ the bedroom doorway ].

There's no other way around it, and anything you do to the contrary is going to increase your chances of being physically harmed, having your weapon taken from you, or dying trying to investigate that bump in the night that started this scenario to begin with.

Think worst case scenario, and make plans to act based on that. If you act in a manner that would be safest for the worst case, you'll probably be able to talk about the "incident" the night before the next morning and not become a statistic.

Brownie
 

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If your bedroom is your safe room then you can create a killing zone in front of it. make sure that the furniture leading to the doorway on the other side will make the intruder get into a direct line of fire in order to approach. You don't have to worry about this if your bedroom door is at the end of a long hallway but the intruder can duck into other doors in the hallway. In my case my bedroom is adjacent to my living room. so my living room furniture is situated to that the intruder will have to go around it and get into direct line of fire from my bedroom. My master bathroom is my fall back room and that is where I would push my wife and defend the bedroom.
 

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We live in a one story house. Our action plan is to bail out of the windows as fast as possible and let the cops clear the house. ;)
 

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Clearing The Building (Cont'd)

Proper clearing of a building as a team is indeed a nerve jangling experience let alone if it is just you. The clock will just creep and your building will suddenly will feel as if it is as large as a football field with possible BG ambush points every couple of feet.

The danger is real and palpable.

Even if you built the structure and know it inside and out, if clearing is done properly it definitely takes much longer than the way TV (COPS Etc.) makes it look.

To overcome the fog and stress that WILL come with clearing, you must drill and drill again. Get your air soft or plastic drill handgun and use your family members as the "Bad Guys" and play old fashioned games of Hide-N-Seek until you can find them day or night, in the light and pitch dark. It's a fun family thing and it WILL help you save your and yours lives and limb.
 
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