Florida Concealed Carry banner
1 - 14 of 14 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
25 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I've had my CCW since 2003 and my Glock 30 (sub-compact .45) for more than that. I've only recently starting carrying everyday and everywhere (where legal of course). I've also been carrying at home aswell using IWB with a white T over it to conceal it. I have a 9 year old boy and a 6 year old girl who still don't know or have yet to notice that I carry. The day will come when they will see it (and it will be soon), notice it, or touch it by mistake and then ask me why do I have it on me. I'm planning on telling them, its daddy's gun for protection and they CANNOT touch it (pretty straight foward huh?). Has this happen to anyone? if so, what have you said?
 

·
Administrator
Joined
·
3,949 Posts
I have a 5 and a 3 year old boy. I carry at home everyday and got those same questions from my sons. At first I was apprehensive about what to say but I told them exactly as you are thinking of saying. Since then the curiosity went away for the kids and they don't even notice my gun anymore.
I think that you could also start to teach your son how to handle your gun safely with fingers off the trigger and not pointed at anyone. Make sure the gun and chamber is empty. Also instruct them to tell an adult if they see a gun when an adult is not around. The earlier you start teaching them the better.
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
6,151 Posts
bdkjose,

I, too, have children at home. Mine are a bit older (a son who will be 12 tomorrow, and daughter, who will be 14 nine days after that). They are with me basically 24/7 because we homeschool so it's not like I can get them off to school then start carrying.

We decided to be right up front with them from the very beginning by taking them to the range with us and even having them sit in on a basic firearms class. Once we actually purchased our firearms we sat down as a family and discussed what the rules are. My husband and I are adamant that the guns are handled correctly every single time they are around. They've seen us break them down and clean them and also dry fire a bit. Every time they are standing behind us. We are never casual. Up front they asked a lot of questions and we let them handle the guns. We stressed the importance that even if you know the gun is unloaded you must always handle them as if they were loaded. I think because we are so careful about it that they too, take it very seriously. We told them they are allowed to touch the guns any time they want to. My son was very curious and in the middle of something he would think about them and ask to handle one of them. I would stop what I was doing and go get a gun out of the safe and let him handle it. He would satisfy his curiosity and give the gun back to me. This happened several times. He even asked to touch all the different kinds of bullets. I wanted to insure there was no curiosity or temptation so everything was allowed with my supervision. This lasted a few weeks. They don't even ask anymore even when we pack our bags to go to the range. They know the guns are in the safe.

I should get my license the first part of October so I haven't been carrying because I just got a holster. For the past week I've been wearing it empty everywhere I go to get used to the feel of it with different outfits. I've worn it at 3:15 but honestly prefer wearing it right up front for a cross draw. It just feels right. The kids have yet to notice I'm even wearing it. The holster came in and I quickly put it in my room before they even saw I owned one. I wanted to see if they would notice. A few times at home I've also carried my LCP unloaded and they still didn't notice. Keep in mind they are very close to me all day when we school. They sit beside me when doing book work (math, Latin, that kind of thing where they are working one-on-one with me) and work in the kitchen preparing meals with me and they get ample mommy hugs all during the day. They still haven't noticed. Today I wore the LCP loaded all day long. Not a clue from either one of them. I'm hoping that once they "find out" that I'm actually carrying they will know that they shouldn't act any differently because I've been carrying and they didn't even know it. After the newness of it wears off they will 'forget' that I'm even carrying because they will see me do everyday things and know that it is not interfering with any of those activities.

They already know that this is a family secret. They understand that when the times comes for our friends to know that we will be the ones to tell them. At the beginning they were just sure they would burst because they couldn't tell anyone. Now that the novelty of it has passed they don't even think about it. Once they know I'm actually carrying they will be very aware and try to act like I'm not doing anything wrong when we are out and about. I'm sure they will be worried that someone will see my gun. I will simply calm their fears and tell them that if I was so close to them and live with them and even they didn't notice I'm sure that some stranger in a store won't notice either.

I guess what I'm trying to say is the more normal you make it the more normal it will be. Soon enough they won't be thinking about it. I guess I could have summed it all up in this paragraph but I felt like writing a book tonight. :) I hope it helped.


MamaBear
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
11,170 Posts
By those ages, all my kids already knew what guns were and knew that mommy and daddy both owned them and that they were NEVER to touch them without our permission. Naturally, they were kept locked up when not under my direct physical control (the guns, not my kids :rolf). My oldest son was already shooting at age 8.

Sit down with them and let them handle and become familiar with your guns (under your direct supervision, of course), teach them the safety rules, etc. If they ask to look at daddy's gun, let them. It will take all the mystery out of them.

That's been my experience, anyway. My two youngest kids became USPSA Certified Range Officers at ages 16 and 14, respectively, and my daughter now has her CHL, so I guess I must have done something right. :D
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,581 Posts
My kids (13 y/o daughter & 12 y/o son) know that I carry at home also. I've taken both of them to the range with me. My daughter says she wants a .45 when she's old enough. My son and I go to the range at least once a month. I had him in the woods hunting with me when he was 6. My dad bought him a .410 when he was 8. My son even saved up enough of his allowance for me to buy him a .270 (he had a certain amount to contribute that way I knew he was serious). I have also given him to shoot everything in my safe except my muzzleloader. My daughter has gotten to be "girly girl" now so guns don't interest her anymore. She's into her friends and sleepovers now.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6 Posts
My situation is a bit different. I care for my Granddaughters mostly full time. I have cared for them since they were born. The youngest (now 7) at 5 years of age asked me "Grandpa, do you have your gun?" when were about to go out on Halloween. I had carried for all those years and did not know that she was aware of my gun. I work very hard to "hide" the firearm. Kids see things and don't always tell you what they see. We discussed why I carry and when asked, I allowed her to hold, dry fire the UNLOADED carry gun. She did not want to go to shoot but did tell me she did feel safer knowing Grandpa had "it" with him.

I reviewed all of the safety concerns with her. Stressed that you NEVER touch a firearm without an adult etc. She also knows I am NOT permitted to carry at school and why. She has seen my licenses (IN, FL, NH) and knows her daddy cannot carry (convicted3 time spouse abuser) She also knows why we do not talk about CCW or ever "tell" grandpa has a gun.

So far so good! I remove the firearm, lock it in the gun safe when we do any rough housing. Both kids know we don't play that way when I have the firearm on my person, and why.

Honesty is the best when dealing with this topic. Perhaps some day I will regret my approach but I don't think that will happen. I carried as a P.O. for juvenile Court some 13 years with my own kids. Locked the firearm up at night and never gave it a thought. Things were different back then! Small town etc.

These are just my thoughts.
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
5,538 Posts
I agree with all above and mine are grown my stepson is 15 and have discussed all the safety issues and he knows not to touch any gunsin the home have taken him out a few times man hes a natural kids good also have dicussed with him what not to do if something is heard in the middle of the night he knows to stay in his room til mom and me come get him i thnk this is a portion we also must teach them cause we all know the BGs are not goin to make an appointment to visit just wondering if anyones done this also.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
22 Posts
My business partner and I were talking about this the other day. I have no children, yet, and his are grown, but he has recently adopted his grandson since his stepdaughter has had "issues." His grandson is 4 and he was talking about different "rules" with his teacher and classmates, he told his class that one of his rules at home was "never pick up poppi's guns and never touch the bullets!"

His teacher, a twenty something female, about choked at the idea of guns in the home, but then said that she was impressed that a child so young knew not to touch the guns. I have been out at their farm working and I always carry my G20 and a S&W 642 with snake shot. The grandson always asks me if I am allowed to hold them, and then tells me "always assume every gun is loaded." I tell him that I am "allowed" and that I carry them so that I can stop the moccasins and hogs from gettin' us.

The point of this little story is that with proper direction, a child can understand the safety rules for firearms. Letting them see what a rifle round does to a mammal (deer, hogs, whatever) helps too!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
53 Posts
I have two daughters both 17, and a wife. A couple years ago when I decided to get my concealed permit, I took some time to get them a gun they could learn with, and teach them and my wife to shoot. The wife was the most adament about learning to shoot, and actually took a pissed-off approach to the whole idea. But some coaxing and proding and I finally got them all on the range. Whatever you do dont teach your own wife, unless you absolutly have to. Its much better to have someone else teach them.

Anyway, I got my concealed permit, my younger of the two picked up target shooting with a bolt action .22 rifle we picked up for her, and the older of the two enjoyed shooting USPSA pistol competitions with me. Her favorite gun is my S&W .45 1911, which is my favorite too. A friend let her borrow his 9mm 1911, and she used that in competitions.

The wife will go and shoot with us but only as a family outing/event, but wont go with me just to shoot. Its not her cup of tea.

I carry around the house, and my wife asked me why, I told her for the same reason we have batteries in the smoke alarm and a fire extinguisher under the sink. Not that I think we will have a problem, but for the one time that we do, I will have it availalbe
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
6,151 Posts
My two youngest kids became USPSA Certified Range Officers at ages 16 and 14, respectively, and my daughter now has her CHL, so I guess I must have done something right. :D
Congratulations, deadeyedick!

You've obviously done something right with your children. I've looked up USPSA as well as National Range Officers Institute as these are new terms to me. I've bookmarked it so I can go back and educate myself when that proverbial block of time shows itself. Thank you for sharing new resources for a newbie like me.

MamaBearto2
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,083 Posts
My daughter is VERY curious about firearms. Eventually, she will be going to the range with me, but not until she's 12...personal and family decision, based on our daughter. With anyone else's kids, that age my vary.

However, I don't hide the fact that I own, shoot, and carry a firearm from her. She knows I carry. She knows not to blab that to anyone AND WHY.

WHY is VERY important. If you don't tell them WHY something's dangerous or important, curiosity will get the better of them and they'll try to find out why for themselves.

Bad juju.

I've explained the Four Rules to her. When I clean my gun, she's in the room, and will even admonish me if she thinks I'm getting sloppy with muzzle discipline...which is only when I have the slide off the frame while cleaning. I don't bother correcting her. I don't mind if she's "too" safe. If I'm doing dryfire practice (or lately, dryfiring to smooth out the action of my post-recall SR9), she's very careful to watch where the muzzle is pointed if she's walking into the room.

She's got a few more years, but I'm confident that if I keep this up, when it's her time, she'll be ready.

And when she does her first IDPA match, I think I just might cry :)

-JT
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
88 Posts
I would trust a responcible "kid" with a gun before i would trust half the ideot's in the military lmao...

Back in the day it would have been nice to live in a time were the 12 year old can walk down the railroad tracks with his .22 slung over the shoulder, like you see in some movie's. must have been better times...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
12 Posts
Blessed to come from Back in the Day

I would trust a responcible "kid" with a gun before i would trust half the ideot's in the military lmao...

Back in the day it would have been nice to live in a time were the 12 year old can walk down the railroad tracks with his .22 slung over the shoulder, like you see in some movie's. must have been better times...
Hello All,

Jakester, I got one better than the .22 on the tracks for ya.

Keep in mind I've been on this planet alittle more than a half a century

but I can remember when we used to take our shotguns to Junior High School

and check them in at the Office till after school so we could go hunting in the

fields next to the school yard (during hunting season ). It was quite common

to see groups of boys with guns walking to and from local fields during

hunting seasons. This was back in the day as I said earlier, but you just

didn't hear of any (or think of any for that matter) gun violence coming from

the kids. I grew up in a rural part of Ohio not but a few miles from a pretty

large Rubber Town.

Sure does seem like a land far, far, away and a time long , long, ago.

Thanks for the Memories;)

Safety First...Keep your groups tight,

mM
 
1 - 14 of 14 Posts
Top