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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
My daughter is turning 10 and when I move to Florida she will be living with me permanently. I have a 9mm that I want to start training her to shoot. I want her to become familiar with the weapon and get used to using it so it is not a mystery to her. I am hoping with the training and familiarization I will remove the mystery that otherwise might have her trying to play with it when no one is around.

I would appreciate any ideas on how to start her training with it and get her familiar enough to where she can live fire at the range with me and my wife.
 

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If you have a .22 handgun, I'd start her out with that rather than your 9mm. .22 is a low-recoil caliber than won't scare the daylights out of a 10 year old that has never shot a gun before. As she gets used to the .22, and admits that she enjoys shooting it, then you'll be able to move her to the 9mm gradually. If she really likes shooting, she may even ask you if she can shoot your 9mm before you expect her to.
 

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Yep,.. I started my niece off with one of my Walther P22's and she shoots IDPA with it. She will be 9 in Dec.
 

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I’ve been posting a link to this website often lately: http://corneredcat.com/TOC.aspx#Kids I hope it helps with what you’re looking for.

That entire section is about kids and guns. While we did the safety thing and all that good stuff when we brought the first firearm in the house my grandson didn’t get to actually go shooting one until he turned 10. In great part because that was the minimum age allowed at the range.

We had told him from the beginning we would take him on his 10th birthday and I can’t begin to tell you how excited he was. :)

In preparation for that day we did buy a Savage 10/22, it was really cheap and will be his when he turns 18. Much to our surprise he didn’t want to shoot the pistols, he does like the Savage though. He’ll let us know when he’s ready for something else, we aren’t pushing the issue.

Since he has less mobility with a rifle than he would have with a pistol, I’ll be lying if I said I was unhappy with his decision; still he gets to go to the range with us ever so often and then out to dinner.

Your daughter will enjoy the time with you and hopefully the two of you get to find a hobby you can practice together. Congratulations!!! :)
 

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Hey Goofball,
Here's a reply that I gave to a thread back in June of this year. It doesn't relate to caliber of weapon, but rather the mindset of training a youngster to be comfortable around firearms. If you want to check the whole thread, search "Grandpa has a gun". Very good opinions and insights offered by all here.

"Kids and guns, one of my favorite subjects. Not meaning to be sexist here, but I'm a firm believer that little boys are far more interested and curious of firearms at an early age than little girls, probably because little boys identify more with the role models on TV and movies like Clint Eastwood, Bruce Willis, Mel Gibson, et al, who were saving the world with firearms. I think they need to be dealt with far earlier than girls, in general.

When my kids were like milkmanjoe's (8, 7, & 5, ..boy, boy, girl again) I was a Patrol Officer working evening shift. I kept my G17 loaded to the hilt at all times and left it in wide open view throughout the day when my kids were at home. They were told explicitly "that is Pappa's gun, do NOT touch it without his permission." I knew that soon my son's curiosity would get the best of them, as it did me when I was a boy, so I decided to be pro-active. I trained my sons (daughter was absolutely uninterested) on safe gun handling practices, and taught them that they could handle my firearms with my guidance and permission, never without it. I showed them the basics of how the weapon operated. I showed them how to ensure that a weapon was unloaded. I showed them how to grip the weapon and how to align the sights. I showed them a multitude of things about firearms which took away the stigma that touching a weapon was something that had to be done in secret, lest you get in trouble for it. After a reasonable time of ensuring my boys weren't going to sneak behind my back, and that they felt comfortable asking my permission, my sons would come to me and ask "Pappa, can I look at your Glock?" I'd say, "sure, Son, but bring it to me first." They'd go back and grab it by the slide, and bring it to me muzzle down and hand the butt to me. I'd turn the muzzle away from everyone, drop the magazine, rack the slide and catch the chambered round, then lock the slide back. After looking through the barrel to make sure of no remaining munitions, I'd then ask "is this weapon safe?". They'd say "yes sir", then I'd hand it to them in a safe manner. They were free to drop the slide and have dry fire practice at the TV, all under my direct supervision. After several months of this same scenario, my youngest son again wanted to "look" at Pappa's Glock, but this time when he brought it to me I asked "Son, do you know how to make that weapon safe and then hand it to me?" "Yes Sir". He did exactly as he had been shown many times, and then handed me a safe, empty and locked back weapon for my inspection. Mrs. Hodawg could barely breath watching her 8 year old manipulate a loaded weapon. Later she admitted that she was at first horrified, then later very impressed that her boys had learned to be safe with firearms. From there on she relaxed more about me having loaded weapons in the house.

I still made sure that they were all secured whenever the neighbor's kids came over, but I never worried about my kids being around guns because I had removed the "boogey man" mystique of firearms so that they felt comfortable being around them and could handle them with me there."


Beers y'all,
Ken
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Thanks for the great responses so far. I appreciate the input and help. A lot of the other outside references that were put in here deal exactly with what I am worried about. Taking away the mystique of guns.
 

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I just noticed your new signature line, Goofball......

"~~Taking pride in your race, religion, country, heritage, or whatever else you take pride in DOES NOT mean hating my race, religion, country, heritage, or whatever else I take pride in.

~~PRIDE and HATE do not go together!!!"
Well said, sir!
Beers Hoss,
Ken
 

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My daughter is about to turn 9 next month. I am saving my 1st pistol and rifle for her. Dad got me a Ruger Bearcat 22 revolver and a Chipmunk single shot 22 rifle.
I want to find a appleseed program or similar for her.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
I just noticed your new signature line, Goofball......

"~~Taking pride in your race, religion, country, heritage, or whatever else you take pride in DOES NOT mean hating my race, religion, country, heritage, or whatever else I take pride in.

~~PRIDE and HATE do not go together!!!"
Well said, sir!
Beers Hoss,
Ken
Thanks
 

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i started my daughter at 9 on my savage .22 rifle and s&w 22a pistol...she likes the rifle a lot and wanted her own so i purchased her a ruger 10/22 at a pawn the equipped it with a used stock i bought on ebay, cut down and finished it in her choice of purple with tiger stripes...she doesnt enjoy the pistol a lot but i believe as she grows and enjoys more shooting itll grow on her...

suggestion...look for mild times at the range...we were at the range one day with a lot of large caliber and magnum hanguns and it turned my daughter away from the table to sit back and read a book...the shock of the big guns beat her up a little...my buiggest fear is something like this turning her off to shooting so i want her to grow into enjoying the bigger stuff and that even though you can feel it it isnt hurting or going to hurt you...
 

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I first took my grandson to the range when he turned 9. he got interested in guns when he started reading. he brought me my copy of shotgun news and started asking questions about the weapons.I bought him a Red rider B B rifle and then a single shot 22 .Then He went to Handguns He will turn 11 in December,He still likes .22s but he likes My 357 (with .38s) best .
He has shot Everything i own ,( except shot guns,)Including 45, 44-40, 223, 7.62x39 and the one that kicks the most, an 8mm Mauser.( didn't like that one ) He handles them all in a safe manner and is quick to yell "still hot" at the range till he can safe his weapon.
Imho, Start them young ,Teach safety, satisfy their curiosity and take away the mystery and teach them a weapon is a tool that has to be respected, a dangerous tool but still a tool.
If they are not pushed and allowed to set their own pace, kids will do what they enjoy and will experiment with any weapons placed in front of them.
Good luck:thumsup
 

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i started my daughter at 9 on my savage .22 rifle and s&w 22a pistol...she likes the rifle a lot and wanted her own so i purchased her a ruger 10/22 at a pawn the equipped it with a used stock i bought on ebay, cut down and finished it in her choice of purple with tiger stripes...she doesnt enjoy the pistol a lot but i believe as she grows and enjoys more shooting itll grow on her...

suggestion...look for mild times at the range...we were at the range one day with a lot of large caliber and magnum hanguns and it turned my daughter away from the table to sit back and read a book...the shock of the big guns beat her up a little...my buiggest fear is something like this turning her off to shooting so i want her to grow into enjoying the bigger stuff and that even though you can feel it it isnt hurting or going to hurt you...
BnB, When I showed My daughters the rifle photo. words used were"awesome" and" now that is just cool ":thumsup:thumsup
 

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BnB, When I showed My daughters the rifle photo. words used were"awesome" and" now that is just cool ":thumsup:thumsup
same words my daughter used when she saw it done...
 

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When my daughter was 10, I started her out on several .22s, but she quickly became bored with them and soon graduated to 9mm and .45 acp. By the time she was 14 she was shooting USPSA and IDPA matches regularly, and at 16 became a USPSA Certified Range Officer.
 

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When my daughter was 10, I started her out on several .22s, but she quickly became bored with them and soon graduated to 9mm and .45 acp. By the time she was 14 she was shooting USPSA and IDPA matches regularly, and at 16 became a USPSA Certified Range Officer.
Alright!! Congrats on teaching her right, And on her advancement :thumsup:thumsup
 

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Yep,.. I started my niece off with one of my Walther P22's and she shoots IDPA with it. She will be 9 in Dec.
Where do they let you shoot a .22 in IDPA?

My daughter turns 10 this year too; she's shot my BB pistol many times. That's a good first step, but she's not particularly interested in "real" guns yet.
 

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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
Thanks to all the new posters. I appreciate all the comments.
 

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Where do they let you shoot a .22 in IDPA?

My daughter turns 10 this year too; she's shot my BB pistol many times. That's a good first step, but she's not particularly interested in "real" guns yet.
we have a 12 year old kid who shoots a beretta neos .22 in idpa with us...hes a head shot double tap master and a lot of fun to shoot with...its good experience for him and i'm sure hes gonna do quite well when he graduates to the larger calibers...
 
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