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Hope I'm not getting "CRS" syndrome, :grin but I seem to have forgotten the last letter of the AOJ triad.... the one that really isn't in the acronym, but should be. and would turn the "triad" into a "quadrad." Certainly "Ability, Opportunity, Jeopardy," but the fourth element (I recall it starts with a "P"), is the one that describes whether or not one has the "duty to retreat" in the given situation.

Anybody recall what the "P" is?

Thx. :thumsup
 

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According to Branca there are 5: innocence, imminence, proportionality, reasonableness and avoidance.
 

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According to Branca there are 5: innocence, imminence, proportionality, reasonableness and avoidance.
Brian is correct and not that the order matters that much, but Branca orders the five elements of self-defense slightly differently as: 1) Innocence, 2) Imminence, 3) Proportionality, 4) Avoidance, and 5) Reasonableness, with that "reasonableness" element as the "umbrella that covers the other four elements."

The A-O-J triad is a great tool for real-time assessment of the "Imminence" element. While the term "preclusion" doesn't appear in Branca's book, the "duty to retreat" does and is a component of the fourth element, "Avoidance" and why it's not part of the A-O-J triad used to assess "imminence." If at all possible, avoiding the situation is always a good idea because avoiding the need for a self-defense use of force will help keep one on the right side of the law. Regardless, only 16 states have a legal "duty to retreat," if it is reasonably safe to do so (with certain exceptions, one being the "castle doctrine"). So "preclusion" is more about thinking about the lawfulness of a self-defense use of force, while A-O-J is focused on assessing the threat and deciding RFN to use lethal force.

As Brian has frequently posted his advice here on FCC, the time to think about the legalities of a self-defense use of lethal force is not in the heat of the moment of answering a imminent threat and will likely cause one to delay the appropriate response and get themselves killed.
 

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The academy taught it as Means, motive, opportunity with the imminent element necessarily present. Not 4, not 5 elements, but 3 requirements were necessary for deadly force along with the imminent element.
 

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You guys beat me to it. Just found this thread.

The elimination of Preclusion (or "duty to retreat") is what SYG is all about.

It bugs the ever-living $hit out of me when I hear pundits, politicians, reporters, and activists say that SYG means "shoot first and ask questions later." :aarg Absolutely false. Intentionally false. What I like to call DISinformation.

Nope. ALL the prerequisites for the use of lethal force still apply. You just don't have to prove that you couldn't run away.
 

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The academy taught it as Means, motive, opportunity with the imminent element necessarily present. Not 4, not 5 elements, but 3 requirements were necessary for deadly force along with the imminent element.
It's still three requirements represented by the A-O-J triad necessary to make the right decision to use deadly force in self-defense. The five elements Branca writes about are necessary to maximize one's chances of success in winning the legal battle after the physical battle is over. A-O-J should be enough, but according to Branca, it's not quite that simple in many jurisdictions.
 
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