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Amazing...they just re-invented GSR. :doh

Unless each cartridge gets a unique pollen signature, how would they ever be able to match a particular fired bullet to the shooter?

Dopes. :thumbsdwn
 

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I have a novel idea. Why don't they go after enter criminals, make the three strikes your out law nationwide and stop pleabargain with criminals. Many criminals have long criminal records. Then after that we can start worrying about nano technology for bullets.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
As far as I can tell, the nano tags do not id an individual, that's why I don't know if I really care.

The cause for concern is really the movement in the direction of IDing gun users. In theory it could help, but of course, it is an infringement. This tech is being proposed for use in Britain however, and as we all know their gun laws are lightyears apart from ours (Thankfully).

As for the plea bargaining comment. I can comment on this first hand as I have witnessed what leads up to such agreements and the strategies several state's attorneys have used.

The offering of a plea is a tactical maneuver, not a cop out.

If a prosecutor has strong evidence to back him up, there will be no plea offer or a plea that is effectively the same as the max sentence.

Usually, however, the evidence is not very strong. CSI has done a lot to cloud peoples perspectives of how well evidence can be used to incriminate. The truth is that unfortunately, mistakes can be made easily that cannot be undone. I have seen several examples of mishandling of evidence in the chain of custody that have made good cases go bad.

I'm sure that CSI alone is not to blame as many people have a "Perry Mason" perspective on how cases should run too ;).

The reality is that the prosecutor usually only has two choices; offer a plea or try the case knowing there is a high probability of loss. After all, they bear the burden of proving beyond a reasonable doubt.

Of note, there are requirements that prevent plea offers from falling below a certain level of punishment, depending on the offender's criminal history.

I, as much as anyone, wish criminals would be taken off the streets for good.

However, for me, knowing that bad people go free in our system is part of the price I pay as a citizen of a free democracy.

Sorry to rant ;)
 

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As for the plea bargaining comment. I can comment on this first hand as I have witnessed what leads up to such agreements and the strategies several state's attorneys have used.
My experience with bad guys and plea bargaining:

My place got broken into when I wasn't there about 15 years ago. It was reported by a neighbor. The police saw a known bad guy waiting for a bus with a plastic trash bag full of stuff. They checked out the stuff, found it was my stuff and arrested him. While awaiting trial, the bad guy turns in some of his friends without reaching a deal with the DA. I guess he thought it would make the cops his friends.

Trial date comes, the DA tells the bad guy he can do something like one year in state lock up or 6 months in county. He explained to the bad guy that the people who he turned in were all going to county.

Bad guy took 1 year in state without his former friends rather than spend 6 months with his former friends in county.

"Plea bargains" can be a good thing.

Why take the bus? I guess the bad guy thought gas prices were too high back then.
 

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British scientists no less. They don't even allow guns over there (or not many), so why are the Brits doing this type of research? This is kind of funny to me.
 
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