Home range design
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Thread: Home range design

  1. #1

    Home range design

    Now that Iíve been in my new home a little over a year and have made decent progress on the critical projects list, Iím looking to set up a range.

    I have a truck load of dirt near my rear property line. Behind this is a 12 acre hay field that has no activity other than cutting hay every couple months. Behind that is an out of business chicken house that rumor has it will soon be converted to a self storage.

    There are no legal hurdles to shooting here, I meet the legal criteria and many neighbors shoot regularly.

    Most shooting would be handgun from close range. There may be occasional .223 or .308. Probably not anything more powerful than that, but I am a fan of overbuilding.

    I have deck on the loft at the rear of the barn that could be used as a raised shooting platform for rifle shooting. I have not measured the distance from deck to dirt pile but I would estimate it at a bit over 100 yards.

    Looking for ideas. How would you setup your range under these circumstances? I have never shot steel targets but am interested in doing so with smaller rounds like 9mm and .22. Would you dig out the bottom of the dirt pile, frame it and recess the steel targets within the hole for ricochet management?

    I am not looking to put much money into this as I still have higher priority projects as far as budget goes, but I have quite a bit of lumber on hand and would like to work with what I have.

    Thanks in advance for any ideas!




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    Last edited by Woodsy; 02-06-2020 at 12:42 PM.

  2. #2
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    Woodsy

    Look at my thread with pics called Home Shooting Range posted 11/19

    I did my research and outlined the procedure in the thread.

    Best of Luck with the project!

  3. #3
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    I used 6x6 treated posts, 3 feet below and 6 above ground( all set in concrete 1 bag quick dry per post). Framed with pt 2x8 lumber filled with dirt,rocks etc. The framing goes inside the box so the dirt pressure is pushing out. Heavy plywood face leaving a 6 inch void to fill with gravel, then Tractor Supply heavy rubber stall mats screwed to the face.

    On the steel, it hangs with a slight angle, top edge further out than bottom for deflection. The steel targets all hang nicely from a set of brackets and a 2x4 spanning about eight to ten feet. Any extra rocks, bricks can be dumped in the box.

    I built 14 wide 6 high and 5+ deep.

    Contact me if I can help, 407-383-0724

    Roger

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  5. #4
    Distinguished Member AFJuvat's Avatar
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    Keep in mind that by law, a projectile cannot leave your property. If it does, you are civilly and possibly criminally responsible for anything it hits.

    If that dirt pile is on your property line, you will have to rig up a backstop that will prevent the bullets from leaving, which unfortunately, probably means moving that dirt pile.

    IMO, incorporating that dirt pile into a tall backstop would be the safest bet. The backstop that Shark1007 did @ 5' wide is perfectly adequate for just about anything short of the large magnum calibers.

    You can be creative with your materials, Shark1007 used PT lumber, other options which may be more or less expensive in your area are railroad ties, and stacks of scrap, bald tires that have been filled with sand and gravel.

    One thing also to remember is that at some point, the backstop will need repairs, so the more durable the material you choose, the less maintenance you will need down the road.

    Finally, you may want to consider water drainage. Water will percolate through the backstop, carrying lead with it. You certainly do not want that winding up in your pond or into your well.
    To speak without thinking is to shoot without aiming.

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  6. #5
    Quote Originally Posted by AFJuvat View Post
    Keep in mind that by law, a projectile cannot leave your property. If it does, you are civilly and possibly criminally responsible for anything it hits.

    If that dirt pile is on your property line, you will have to rig up a backstop that will prevent the bullets from leaving, which unfortunately, probably means moving that dirt pile.

    IMO, incorporating that dirt pile into a tall backstop would be the safest bet. The backstop that Shark1007 did @ 5' wide is perfectly adequate for just about anything short of the large magnum calibers.

    You can be creative with your materials, Shark1007 used PT lumber, other options which may be more or less expensive in your area are railroad ties, and stacks of scrap, bald tires that have been filled with sand and gravel.

    One thing also to remember is that at some point, the backstop will need repairs, so the more durable the material you choose, the less maintenance you will need down the road.

    Finally, you may want to consider water drainage. Water will percolate through the backstop, carrying lead with it. You certainly do not want that winding up in your pond or into your well.
    The dirt pile IS the backstop. Thatís a full size dump truck full of dirt. Itís about 8 feet tall and at least as much wide. Nothing I shoot is going to penetrate even close to half of that pile. Thereís a fence behind the pile about 5-7 feet that is the property line. I have no concerns about bullets exiting my property. Iím several hundred feet away from the well so no concerns there either.

    Iím more concerned about ricochets from steel targets as I have neighbors on both sides of me. Thatís why Iím thinking about either digging out and recessing the steel targets a couple feet within the dirt pile, or angling it out at 45 degrees several feet.



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  7. #6
    Quote Originally Posted by Shark1007 View Post
    I used 6x6 treated posts, 3 feet below and 6 above ground( all set in concrete 1 bag quick dry per post). Framed with pt 2x8 lumber filled with dirt,rocks etc. The framing goes inside the box so the dirt pressure is pushing out. Heavy plywood face leaving a 6 inch void to fill with gravel, then Tractor Supply heavy rubber stall mats screwed to the face.

    On the steel, it hangs with a slight angle, top edge further out than bottom for deflection. The steel targets all hang nicely from a set of brackets and a 2x4 spanning about eight to ten feet. Any extra rocks, bricks can be dumped in the box.

    I built 14 wide 6 high and 5+ deep.

    Contact me if I can help, 407-383-0724

    Roger
    Thanks. Great idea about angling the steel targets. How do you do that? I was thinking just hang them from rope, but couldnít angle them that way... some sort of spring bracket mounted to the 2x4 perhaps?


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  8. #7
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    The steel target suppliers sell a strap type mounting thing with holes on each end. You take a long bolt and bolt the plate tight. Then you double nut toward the very end of the 4 inch or so 1/4x20 bolt. When you hang it from the 2x4, the plate hangs at an appropriate angle. They swing a little depending on the kinetic energy of the round.

    By design, the bullet deflects down in fragments. You must use at least AR500 steel. Even the smallest divot in softer steel can cause a serious ricochet. I shoot no closer than 15 yards to steel.

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