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Thread: Is there much difference between 44 magnum vs. 357 magnum?

  1. #1

    Is there much difference between 44 magnum vs. 357 magnum?

    If I don't hunt is having a .44 magnum worth buying? Been thinking of a S&W 629 5".

    Just wondering views or opinions. Thanks.
    Glock27, G30sf
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    S&W M&P9c
    Mossberg 500 persuader
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  2. #2
    Distinguished Member T.S.'s Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by LevelG27 View Post
    If I don't hunt is having a .44 magnum worth buying? Been thinking of a S&W 629 5".

    Just wondering views or opinions. Thanks.
    May I recommend that before you buy a .44 magnum, that you go to a range that you can rent one and shoot it first.

    I have fired both and, IMHO, the .357 magnum is fun to shoot all day long wheras the .44 magnum is not. After a while the recoil of the .44 magnum begins to take its toll on your hand.

    For Concealed Carry or self-defense I would choose the .357 magnum.

    If money is no object, and you want to buy one to shoot once in a while, then go for it.
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  3. #3
    Distinguished Member TitleIIToyLover's Avatar
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    Comparing the 40 S&W to the 357 Magnum to the 44 Remington Magnum in a Winchester silver-tip hollow point loading
    Caliber 40/ 357/ 44
    Muzzle velocity in fps 1205/ 1290/ 1250
    Muzzle energy in fl-lbs 500/ 535/ 729

    As you can see the muzzle energy of the 44 magnum is more than 40 percent hight that the 357 and 40.
    Mass times velocity: F=Ma
    Pacmyer grips on the 629 help some. I don't want to shoot mine with the OEM wood grips anymore.

    My little chart didn't line up but I hope you get the idea
    Last edited by TitleIIToyLover; 05-18-2010 at 03:10 AM.

  4. #4
    I suppose I should test fire one. I almost had sold my 686 plus, 7 rounds, .357 mag. I'm glad I didn't. Anyway the 686 is a medium size frame and shooting the .357 magnum was so smooth not much recoil at all. I was a little surprised how little the recoil was.

    I figured the 629 being a large frame revolver would of been the same shooting the .44 magnum. A step up in frame weight would absorb the recoil.

    Money is sort of an object. I have enough to spend on ONE revolver but I was also looking at the Night Guard 325 shoots .45acp or the 329 Night Guard shoots .44 magnum. Although the Night Guard weighs a few ounces less might have a bit more recoil.

    Thanks for input..I guess I really need to shoot the above before spending 1k or so.
    Glock27, G30sf
    Glock 22Gen4
    Beretta 96A1 (.40 cal)
    Beretta 92 Inox
    S&W M&P9
    S&W M&P.45 midsize (10+1)
    S&W M&P9c
    Mossberg 500 persuader
    S&W 686+, 7 rounds
    S&W 642
    CZ 75B 9mm (high polished stainless steel)

  5. #5
    Super Moderator Rvrctyrngr's Avatar
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    I've never found the .44Mag all that pleasant to shoot, at all. I'm not recoil sensitive in the least, but it just is not enjoyable for me. I'll shoot a 686 all day long, though. One of my favorite revos. I'm glad you didn't sell it, too!

    Given the choices above, I'd take the 329. Much more versatile platform.
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  6. #6
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    I hand load .44 specials for my 6" M29 and can shoot them all day long, with no repercussions. However, as you know, the .357 can also fire .38's, which can be more cost effective. I also find the .357 more flexible and easier to carry, especially in a small frame gun. As previously mentioned, the 686 (L frame) Smith is a good carry weapon, as opposed the the large frame (N) Smith in .44 mag. You can get a .357 in the N frame, but you might as well get the .44, as the weight is negligible.
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  7. #7
    Distinguished Member deadeyedick's Avatar
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    I think any well-rounded handgun collection should include a .44 Magnum; I bought one just for that reason. And you can shoot .44 Specials all day long with one.
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    Dr. Calvin "Fumbles" Killshot

  8. #8
    Member WheelGunner's Avatar
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    My Model 29 is my favorite weapon. The recoil has never bothered me, but it is significantly more than the recoil from any .357 I've shot.

    On the other hand, loaded with .44 specials, the recoil is downright mild.

  9. #9
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    There is usually a significant difference in both the power and the felt recoil of the .44 magnum and the .357 magnum. In handguns, commercial .44 magnum rounds produce anywhere from 1 1/2 times to twice the muzzle energy of the .357 magnum rounds. This translates into increased felt recoil in comparable weapons. It also translates into significantly more power delivered to the target.

    I always suggest that a person test fire a weapon/cartridge system before buying. I know of an awful lot of magnum revolvers that have become safe queens, simply because of the power of the cartridge. If you have an identifiable need for a given system [hunting, large animal defense, etc.], that should weigh in your decision. Try before you buy. Good luck.

  10. #10
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    I carried a Super Blackhawk everywhere I went for over a decade of "outback" life in the great white north. I'd say not so much difference if you're using it as a self defense cartridge, but a great deal if you're shooting at a really big animal! Even the .44 is not enough then, but it might do the job in a pinch, and is just another compromise that I was okay with.

    One thought that I don't see mentioned above: If you're not usually going to push hard loads through it, most good .45 Colts can be loaded very hot, as hot as a factory .44 mag, but the pistols chambered for the Colt cartridge are usually much lighter and more manageable. Another alternative, I'm quite fond of the .41 magnum, but would want to load it down for defense, so you lose the interchangeability that the .44 mag enjoys with the .44 special cartridges. I still have a "back pocket" shell holder under my bed with a row of bear loads, and a row of .44 special HP's. Its amusing to think back on those days when a huge single-action hog-leg was my "edc!" Quite a departure from what you'd find me with today, but then, its another world down here in S. Florida, with much different concerns.

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